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The Republican and Democratic parties in numbers

  • Understanding the Republican and Democratic parties by the numbers

    News organizations frequently publish profiles on “the American voter,” from Trump-supporting farmers in Nebraska to Democratic backers in Miami. The individual narratives are telling, but there’s also plenty of data on the bigger picture of American voters to consider. Among all registered voters, 50% support the Democratic party and 42% support the Republican party. The livelihoods, beliefs, and ages of those voters vary greatly, and once topics like religion are considered, the gap grows wider.

    How do both parties view climate change? Which party does Generation X side with? Compiling polls, studies, and reports from the Pew Research Center, Gallup, and E-Poll Market Research, Stacker created a comprehensive list of where Democrat and Republican voters stand on these and other major issues. Read on to see which issues most strongly divide Democrats and Republicans, and learn the one measure on gun regulation both parties overwhelmingly support in equal measures.

    RELATED: Click here to see political podcasts you should listen to across the ideological spectrum.

  • Breakdown by gender — Democrats

    Men who identify or lean toward Democrat: 44%

    Women who identify or lean toward Democrat: 56%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    According to the Pew Research Center, the party with which American men and women identify has not changed significantly over recent decades. 56% of women identify or lean Democrat, while 44% of men do.

  • Breakdown by gender — Republicans

    Men who identify or lean toward Republican: 48%

    Women who identify or lean toward Republican: 37%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    37% of women fall into this category, along with 48% of men. According to Pew, the gap between men’s and women’s preferred party is the widest it has ever been.

  • By state — Democrats

    Most Democratic states:

    1. Massachusetts: 57% Democratic, 26% Republican

    2. Maryland: 56% Democratic, 28% Republican

    3. New York: 52% Democratic, 29% Republican

    4. Vermont: 52% Democratic, 30% Republican

    5. Hawaii: 50% Democratic, 28% Republican

    Source: Gallup

    There are more Democratic-supporting states than Republican-supporting ones for the first time in three years, according to a Gallup poll. The 2017 poll asked state residents to self-report their party preference. Democrats won the majority of support in 19 states, including the highest totals in Massachusetts, Maryland, New York, Vermont, and Hawaii.

  • By state — Republicans

    Most Republican states:

    1. Wyoming: 56% Republican, 27% Democratic

    2. North Dakota: 56% Republican, 28% Democratic

    3. Utah: 56% Republican, 29% Democratic

    4. Idaho: 53% Republican, 31% Democratic

    5. Alaska: 52% Republican, 31% Democratic

    Source: Gallup

    The same Gallup poll found a majority of Republican support in 16 states, predominantly in the Great Plains region. The states with the most Grand Old Party (GOP) support were Wyoming, North Dakota, Utah, Idaho, and Alaska. Another 15 states in the poll were considered “competitive,” and did not lean toward a particular party.

  • Race and ethnicity — Democrats

    White voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 43%

    African-American voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 84%

    Hispanic voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 63%

    Asian-American voters who identify or lean toward Democrat: 65%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democratic support is strongest among African-American votes, according to the Pew Research Center. 84% of African-Americans support the party, along with 65% of Asian-American voters and 63% of Hispanic voters. White voters had the least support for Democrats among the four racial groups, with 43% of voters supporting the party.

  • Race and ethnicity — Republicans

    White voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 51%

    African-American voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 8%

    Hispanic voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 28%

    Asian-American voters who identify or lean toward Republican: 27%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    While white voter support for the Democrat party has increased in recent years, the racial group remains the strongest supporter of the Republican party. Hispanic voters are the second-strongest voting bloc, with 28% favoring the GOP over the Democrats.

  • Age — Democrats

    Millennials (born 19811996) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 59%

    Generation X'ers (born 19651980) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 48%

    Baby boomers (born 19461964) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 48%

    Silent generation (born 19281945) who identify or lean toward Democrat: 43%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    A 2017 Pew Research Center poll found the strongest Democratic support among America’s youngest voters. Millennials, those born between 1981 and 1996, favored Democrats over Republicans among 59% of voters. Almost 50% of Generation X and the Baby Boomers support Democrats.

  • Age — Republicans

    Millennials (born 19811996) who identify or lean toward Republican: 32%

    Generation X'ers (born 19651980) who identify or lean toward Republican: 43%

    Baby boomers (born 19461964) who identify or lean toward Republican: 46%

    Silent generation (born 19281945) who identify or lean toward Republican: 52%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Republican support is strongest among those born between 1928 and 1945. Baby Boomers have the second-most Republican support, with 46% of people in their age group backing the GOP.

     

  • Education level — Democrats

    Those with a high school degree or less who identify or lean toward Democrat: 45%

    Those with some college education who identify or lean toward Democrat: 47%

    Those with a four-year college degree who identify or lean toward Democrat: 54%

    Those with post-grad experience who identify or lean toward Democrat: 63%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    Democrats have the majority of voters with a bachelor’s or post-graduate degree, with 63% and 54%, respectively. According to the 2017 Pew Research Center poll, 49% of white voters with a bachelor’s degree sided with Democrats.

  • Education level — Republicans

    Those with a high school degree or less who identify or lean toward Republican:  47%

    Those with some college education who identify or lean toward Republican: 45%

    Those with a four-year college degree who identify or lean toward Republican: 39%

    Those with post-grad experience who identify or lean toward Republican: 31%

    Source: Pew Research Center

    In recent years, Republicans have increased their share of voters with less than a bachelor’s degree. The majority of their support comes from voters who list a high school degree or less as their highest level of education. This is especially true among white voters in this category. According to Pew, 58% of these voters side with Republicans.

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