Skip to main content

Main Area

Main

States that have gained (or lost) the most jobs in 2019 so far

  • #41. Wisconsin

    - Net change in employment: -0.1% (4,353 jobs lost)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 3.1 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: -0.2% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 3.2%, 100,667 people unemployed)

    Wisconsin is a swing state in presidential elections, which means its economy matters to presidential hopefuls. And it may not bode well for incumbents in Wisconsin, with all 72 counties showing worse unemployment rates than they did a year ago.

  • #40. Georgia

    - Net change in employment: -0.1% (3,991 jobs lost)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 5.1 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.2% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 3.5%, 177,249 people unemployed)

    Over half of Georgia’s regions—and many of its counties—posted record low unemployment in September. That same month, unemployment claims dipped 7%.

  • #39. Wyoming

    - Net change in employment: 0% (53 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 289,257 jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.3% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 3.8%, 10,908 people unemployed)

    Coal has historically been a major part of Wyoming’s economy. A string of coal company bankruptcies is threatening employment in the state, and could put thousands out of their jobs.

  • #38. Vermont

    - Net change in employment: 0.1% (317 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 345,888 jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.4% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 2.2%, 7,583 people unemployed)

    Vermont has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation. At just 2.2% in September 2019, the state has fewer people actively looking for and unable to find work than any other state.

  • #37. Massachusetts

    - Net change in employment: 0.2% (6,673 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 3.8 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.2% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 2.9%, 111,479 people unemployed)

    Massachusetts may have a low unemployment rate, but that hasn’t spared some employees in the state from a spate of recent cuts. Among the companies that have cut jobs are an Ohio-based defense contracting agency and the multinational corporation Nestlé.

    You may also like: Highest paying jobs that only require a 2-year degree

  • #36. Oregon

    - Net change in employment: 0.2% (5,148 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 2.1 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.2% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 4.1%, 86,052 people unemployed)

    Hiring slowed in Oregon in 2019, but the jobless rate has held steady. Employment gains were strongest in the health care and social assistance sectors, and weakest in government.

  • #35. North Dakota

    - Net change in employment: 0.2% (993 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 403,938 jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.1% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 2.5%, 9,910 people unemployed)

    North Dakota may have a low unemployment rate generally, but this is not true across all industries. The state is experiencing a shortage of qualified nurses, which officials are currently trying to rectify with relocation incentives for out-of-state nurses.

  • #34. Kentucky

    - Net change in employment: 0.5% (10,508 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 2.1 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: -0.1% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 4.4%, 90,421 people unemployed)

    The state of Kentucky’s labor market played a prominent role in its gubernatorial race in November. The 4.4% unemployment rate had President Donald Trump campaigning for the incumbent Republican governor in the hopes of boosting his popularity despite high unemployment. The Democrat won the election, but the incumbent has not conceded.

  • #33. Illinois

    - Net change in employment: 0.5% (35,463 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 6.5 million jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.4% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 3.9%, 255,924 people unemployed)

    Illinois residents generally are not having trouble finding work. However, that hasn’t stopped many of the state’s most skilled workers from leaving to seek employment elsewhere, which has policymakers and businesses worried about being able to fill vacant jobs.

  • #32. Montana

    - Net change in employment: 0.6% (3,389 jobs gained)
    - Sept. 2019 employment: 533,047 jobs
    - Net change in unemployment: 0.4% (Sept. 2019 unemployment rate: 3.3%, 17,776 people unemployed)

    There are so few workers available in Montana to fill vacant jobs that employers are turning to unusual sources for employees. Some employers are looking to high school students, retired men and women, and even felons, to meet labor shortages.

    You may also like: The best school district in every state

2018 All rights reserved.