Do you know Alabama's official state symbols?

Kevin Ruck // Shutterstock

Do you know Alabama's official state symbols?

Each state in America boasts its own culture, history, and natural beauty. To represent such diversity, people from these states have chosen their own set of symbols and customs. Specific flags, songs, mottos, flowers, and even fruits commemorate the uniqueness of individual states. Some of these symbols border on the bizarre: Texas, for example, has made the Dutch oven its official state cooking pot. Other symbols are more universal, like state birds.

Many people remember learning about their states' history back in elementary school. But can you still remember your state bird? How about your state flower? To test your state knowledge, Stacker compiled a list of symbols in Alabama.

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Good Free Photos

Clue: Alabama state fish

Clue (freshwater): This fish is consideredto be one of the most aggressive predators in its ecosystem, even though it is the most popular game fish in the United States, particularly in the southern states. Catch it swimming in a body of freshwater nearby.

Clue (saltwater): Reaching 280 pounds and nicknamed the "silver king," these fish can be found along the Alabama coast and Mobile estuary. The species' greatest predatory advantage is its ability to its inflate its swim bladder with air like a lung, providing an edge when the water's oxygen levels are low.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; NOAA // Wikimedia Commons

Answer: Alabama state fish

Answers: Largemouth bass (freshwater), fighting tarpon (saltwater)

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Kevin Ruck // Shutterstock

Clue: Alabama state mammal

Alabama has two state mammals. One is the American black bear. The other is a large, gentle aquatic creature that feeds on underwater vegetation and lives in coastal and river environments. This animal and its kin are more closely related to elephants than whales.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service // Flickr

Answer: Alabama state mammal

- State mammals: American black bear, West Indian manatee

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Pixabay

Clue: Alabama state song

Humanitarian and educator Julia S. Tutwiler wrote this song, which she penned while studying in Germany. A woman named Edna Gockel Gussen of Birmingham wrote the music, and both Tutwiler’s words and Gussen’s music were officially adopted as the state song of Alabama in 1931.

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brager // Wikimedia Commons

Answer: Alabama state song

- Answer: "Alabama"

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Kevin Ruck // Shutterstock

Clue: Alabama state insect

This species is one of the most recognizable of its kind, with black, orange, and white-patterned wings. It is so iconic that it has been bred on the International Space Station.

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Lilly M // Wikimedia Commons

Answer: Alabama state insect

- State insect: Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

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Carol M. Highsmith // Wikimedia Commons

Clue: Alabama state tree

Once a fixture in coastal plain forests from east Texas to southeastern Virginia, Alabama’s state tree has been reduced in recent centuries to 3% of its historical range. This tree is distinctive for its needles, which can grow up to 18 inches in length and look like starbursts when observed from below.

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Amanda // Flickr

Answer: Alabama state tree

Answer: Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris)

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Creative Commons Zero

Clue: Alabama state bird

In 1927, Alabama became one of the first states to adopt an official bird—and has a compelling narrative behind the selection. Civil War soldiers from the state were nicknamed after this bird for the bright cloth on their uniforms coattails, collars, and sleeves.

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Tim Zurowski // Shutterstock

Answer: Alabama state bird

Answer: Northern flicker (Yellowhammer)

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Carol M. Highsmith

Clue: Alabama state flower

Also called “the rose of winter,” Alabama's state flower was designated in 1959, replacing the goldenrod. While this flower can be found in Alabama, it is also native to a number of Asian countries, including China, Korea, Taiwan, and Japan. With smooth and polished leaves, this flower is known for its distinct shades of white, pink, and red.

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Trish Hartmann // Flickr

Answer: Alabama state flower

Answer: Camellia

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