Do you know New Jersey's official state symbols?

f11photo // Shutterstock

Do you know New Jersey's official state symbols?

Each state in America boasts its own culture, history, and natural beauty. To represent such diversity, people from these states have chosen their own set of symbols and customs. Specific flags, songs, mottos, flowers, and even fruits commemorate the uniqueness of individual states. Some of these symbols border on the bizarre: Texas, for example, has made the Dutch oven its official state cooking pot. Other symbols are more universal, like state birds.

Many people remember learning about their states' history back in elementary school. But can you still remember your state bird? How about your state flower? To test your state knowledge, Stacker compiled a list of symbols in New Jersey.

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Stinkie Pinkie // Wikimedia Commons

Clue: New Jersey state fish

Clue (freshwater): These opportunists will make a living any way they can, provided the water they inhabit is clean, cool, and clear. They prefer aquatic insects, but they'll gobble up any insect that falls into the water, and even dine on smaller fish and crayfish.

Clue (saltwater game fish): This fish is the largest species of its order. Adults are anadromous, meaning they leave the ocean to spawn in freshwater. Unlike salmon, these fish can spawn multiple times throughout their lifetime (although not necessarily every year).

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Pacific Southwest Region USFWS // Wikimedia Commons; Flickr

Answer: New Jersey state fish

Answers: Brook trout (freshwater), striped bass (saltwater game fish)

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f11photo // Shutterstock

Clue: New Jersey state mammal

New Jersey has no state mammal, but despite its reputation as a place of cities and factories, that’s not for lack of native fauna. One that’s particularly special is a small mammal that can glide through the air using a flap of skin that extends between its front and back legs.

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Tony Campbell // Shutterstock

Answer: New Jersey state mammal

- State mammal: None
- Proposed: Flying squirrel

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mandritoiu // Shutterstock

Clue: New Jersey state insect

This insect was probably first domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it is depicted in tomb paintings, and introduced to North America in the early 17th century. It uses pheromones for almost all of its interactions and communications, including mating, defending themselves, producing food, and warning others.

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Richard Bartz/Munich Makro Freak/Beemaster Hubert Seibring // Wikimedia Commons

Answer: New Jersey state insect

- State insect: European honey bee (Apis mellifera)

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Pixabay

Clue: New Jersey state tree

Although New Jersey’s state tree can grow from Nova Scotia to South Carolina, it is favored in this state as a street tree; the tree’s roots can keep growing even when salt is used to treat roads and sidewalks in the winter. This tree can be distinguished by its acorns, which are larger than the acorns of other similar species with flat caps.

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Katja Schulz // Flickr

Answer: New Jersey state tree

Answer: Northern red oak (Quercus rubra)

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Creative Commons

Clue: New Jersey state bird

New Jersey's state bird is also called a Wild Canary. The bright and delicate yellow species can be found snacking on elegant flora like dandelions, sunflowers, and evening primrose.

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Darren Swim // Wikimedia Commons

Answer: New Jersey state bird

Answer: Eastern goldfinch

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zi3000 // Shutterstock

Clue: New Jersey state flower

Originally designated as New Jersey's flower in 1913, the legislative resolution's power ended the following year, causing uncertainty of its official status until another decision in 1971. This flower has five petals that are blue or purple in color, with dark noticeable veins. This flower is also edible, used as an ingredient in jellies and candies, and as decoration for baking.

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Bernard DUPONT // Flickr

Answer: New Jersey state flower

Answer: Violet

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