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Most dangerous countries for Americans to travel to

  • Mali

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 11.3

    Violent crime is common in the western African nation of Mali, and especially so during local holidays and seasonal events. Terrorist groups also continue to operate in the country and target places of worship, Western diplomatic missions, hotels, and restaurants, the State Department says.

  • North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 7/10/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 4.4

    People cannot travel to North Korea using a U.S. passport without a special validation from the State Department, and even those are only granted in rare cases. Traveling to North Korea means risking arrest and long-term detention, and the U.S. cannot provide emergency services to citizens in the country. The Kim regime has promoted an attitude that Westerners—particularly Americans—are immoral, and have arrested American tourists on allegations of spying.

  • Somalia

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 5.6

    In the eastern African nation of Somalia, U.S. citizens are at risk of violent crimes including kidnapping and murder, and are vulnerable to pirates active in the waters off the Horn of Africa. Terrorists have continued to be active, some targeting Westerners and places where large crowds congregate.

  • South Sudan

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 5.1

    Travel to South Sudan is extremely dangerous due to armed conflict and crime that can include shootings, ambushes, and robberies. The State Department recommends that if you choose to travel tin South Sudan, you do so with a minimum of two vehicles. The State Department also recommends creating a proof-of-life protocol—which are a set of specific questions and answers that, in the case of being taken hostage, loved ones can quickly ascertain you are in danger instead of being taken for a hoax—and avoid all photography in public, as the area is strictly controlled.

  • Sudan

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/11/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 6.2

    The U.S. government suggests citizens reconsider travel to the Central African nation of Sudan because of terrorism and civil unrest, and warns people not to travel to the Darfur region, Blue Nile state, and South Kordofan state because of crime and armed conflict. Terrorist groups in the country have stated their desire to harm and kill Westerners through bombings, shootings, and kidnappings, according to the State Department.

  • Syria

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 2.5

    U.S. citizens should not travel to the Middle Eastern nation of Syria due to the country’s widespread terrorism, armed conflict, and civil unrest. People in Syria face a significant risk of death or injury from the Bashar al-Assad administration’s use of chemical warfare, shelling, and aerial bombardment, according to the State Department, with no area of the country being safe.

  • Venezuela

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 49.2

    U.S. citizens should avoid travel to the South American nation of Venezuela due to crime, civil unrest, arbitrary arrest, and shortages of food, electricity, water, and medicine. The State Department says people should not travel at all to certain neighborhoods in Caracas, roads outside of Caracas after dark, or within 50 miles of the Colombian border.

  • Yemen

    - Advisory: Level 4: Do Not Travel
    - Date advisory updated: 4/9/2019
    - Estimated homicide rate per 100,000 people: 6.1

    No area of the Middle Eastern nation of Yemen is safe, according to the State Department, and visitors to the country could face terrorism, civil unrest, and armed conflict. The military conflict with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates has caused a deterioration of infrastructure within the country, leading to limited electricity, medical care, and drinking water. Yemen was also home to the world’s largest cholera outbreak, and the U.S. government has a limited ability to provide emergency services.

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