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How many of these 50 GED test questions can you get right?

  • How many of these 50 GED test questions can you get right?

    There are plenty of reasons why a person would take the General Education Development (or GED) test. The test was created in 1942 to evaluate returning World War II veterans in the same four subjects that the test evaluates today: reading, social studies, science, and math. Nowadays, those who drop out of high school can take the GED to show the job market that they have the equivalent of high school education.

    However, there have been troubling stories comparing those with just a GED to those with a traditional high school diploma; some employers consider the GED less valuable, and prospective workers find it harder to get a job, even a minimum wage one. Still, in 2017, more than 300,000 Americans took the GED with a 79% passing rate, according to Education Week. Many argue that the passing rate is too high and the GED is too easy, hence the troubling statistics of GED awardees doing hardly better than high school dropouts who didn't complete the test in the job market.

    Once you pass the GED or earn a high school diploma and enter the workforce, your knowledge in reading, science, social studies, and math is likely never tested again (unless, of course, you pursue higher education). So how much do you remember from high school? It might be less than you think; that's why we've compiled 50 questions from PassGED.com.

    Do you remember exponent rules from mathematics? How about the difference between dependent and independent variables in science? While this knowledge may not seem important to your current life, some GED questions also deal with the workings of the U.S. government, reading comprehension, and everyday personal finance.

    Read through our selection of 50 questions to find out what you remember from high school.

    You may also like: Can you pass this 8th-grade assessment test?

  • Question #1 (Math)

    Question #1: In the United States, temperatures are usually reported in degrees Fahrenheit (°F). In other countries, temperatures are often reported in degrees Celsius (°C). The formula F = 1.8C + 32 can be used to convert from degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit. Suppose a weather report says that yesterday's high temperature in Paris, France was 10°C. What is this temperature in degrees Fahrenheit?

    Answer choices:

    - A. 75.6°F
    - B. 33.8°F
    - C. 40°F
    - D. 50°F

  • Answer #1

    Question #1: In the United States, temperatures are usually reported in degrees Fahrenheit (°F). In other countries, temperatures are often reported in degrees Celsius (°C). The formula F = 1.8C + 32 can be used to convert from degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit. Suppose a weather report says that yesterday's high temperature in Paris, France was 10°C. What is this temperature in degrees Fahrenheit?

    - Answer: D. 50°F

  • Question #2 (Science)

    Question #2: The average human fingernail grows at a rate of 3.47 millimeters per month.

    One millimeter = 0.1 centimeters.

    How much, in centimeters, would the average human fingernail grow in one year?

    Answer choices:

    - A. 0.347
    - B. 4.164
    - C. 416.4
    - D. 41.64

  • Answer #2

    Question #2: The average human fingernail grows at a rate of 3.47 millimeters per month.

    One millimeter = 0.1 centimeters.

    How much, in centimeters, would the average human fingernail grow in one year?

    - Answer: B. 4.164

  • Question #3 (Social Studies)

    Question #3: This 1909 cartoon deals with the topic of women's suffrage.

    Which of the following opinions is the cartoon expressing?

    Answer choices:

    - A. In 1909 some women wanted the right to vote.
    - B. Women who vote will neglect their families.
    - C. Many women have more than one child.
    - D. Babies often cry when their mothers leave.

  • Answer #3

    Question #3: Which of the following opinions is the cartoon expressing?

    - Answer: B. Women who vote will neglect their families.

  • Question #4 (Reading)

    Question #4: Change in Policy Email
    To: All Employees
    From: Human Resources
    Subject: Change in Policy

    This email is to notify you of a change in our after-hours work policy. Formerly, approved employees were allowed on the premises during evening hours.

    Effective this Monday, we can no longer allow employees on the premises after 8 p.m. This decision was reached based on security concerns. The safety of all of our employees is of the utmost concern to us, and recent events have caused us to re-examine our current practices.

    Although many of you have probably heard this already, we want to officially inform you that our security system was breached and our office building was broken into. Luckily, no one was hurt. There was one person working in the office, and she managed to call the police and remain undetected by the thief. The thief stole money from the safe, as well as laptops and iPads. He or she escaped before the police could respond and has not yet been identified or arrested. Until we can confirm that the building is secure, you MUST not be in the building after 8:00 p.m.

    We would prefer that employees leave the premises at the end of the regular workday at 5:00 p.m. We understand, however, that project deadlines often require working past the end of the regular workday. If you need to be in the building from the hours of 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. we urge you to be vigilant and to call 911 immediately if you detect suspicious activity.

    This company takes the safety and well being of its employees very seriously. We are working on acquiring advanced security to monitor the grounds later at night, but until then, please be sure to leave the building in a timely manner.

    Question: Who was in the office during the break-in?

    Answer choices:

    - A. Some employees
    - B. One janitor
    - C. One employee
    - D. No one

  • Answer #4

    Question #4: Who was in the office during the break-in?

    - Answer: C. One employee

  • Question #5 (Math)

    Question #5: On his last four tests, Danilo scored 55%, 78%, 84%, and 93%. What score should he get on the next test so that his average on all five tests is 80%?

    Answer choices:

    - A. 90%
    - B. 82.5%
    - C. 92.5%
    - D. 80%

  • Answer #5

    Question #5: On his last four tests, Danilo scored 55%, 78%, 84%, and 93%. What score should he get on the next test so that his average on all five tests is 80%?

    - Answer: A. 90%