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50 animals whose homes are threatened by climate change

  • Tree frog (P. pollicaris)

    - Scientific name: Platypelis pollicaris
    - Geographic region: Madagascar
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

    The tree frog Platypelis pollicaris is found in Madagascar. It is arboreal, meaning it spends its life in trees. This species of tree frog lives in a tree known as the screw pine, as well as inside bamboo stems. The Madagascar forests where these tree frogs live are under threat by human impacts such as shrinking forest habitat, logging, development, introduced species, and agriculture.

  • Tree frog (P. guntherpetersi)

    - Scientific name: Plethodontohyla guntherpetersi
    - Geographic region: Madagascar
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Range shift and dispersal

    Tree frogs of the species Plethodontohyla guntherpetersi are microhylids, or “narrow-mouthed” frogs, found only in Madagascar. The forests where these tree frogs live are under threat by human impacts like shrinking forest habitat, logging, development, introduced species, and agriculture.

  • Spotted barbtail

    - Scientific name: Premnoplex brunnescens
    - Geographic region: South America
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    The spotted barbtail, Premnoplex brunnescens, is a species that scientists still know little about. It is found in the humid mountainous rainforests of the Andes along the western edge of South America, up into Central America. They range from Venezuela and Costa Rica in the north to Bolivia in the south. These birds are very small and inconspicuous, foraging for insects by creeping quietly through undergrowth such as mosses, bark crevices, leaf litter, and along branches. The spotted barbtail sometimes uses its tail for balance, or hangs upside down while searching for bugs. You can listen to the spotted barbtail's song at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • Moth (S. reductatus)

    - Scientific name: Sarcinodes reductatus
    - Geographic region: Asia
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    The moth Sarcinodes reductatus is found in parts of eastern Asia including Borneo and Java. It is large with pink to mauve to brownish coloring, and is usually found in mid- to higher-elevation mountainous forests.

  • Buff-browed foliage-gleaner

    - Scientific name: Syndactyla rufosuperciliata
    - Geographic region: South America
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    Buff-browed foliage-gleaner, Syndactyla rufosuperciliata, has two distinct ranges in South America. One range is along the west coast, where the birds are found in the humid mountain forests of the Andes; the other is a wide-ranging area of the Atlantic forested lowlands on the eastern side of the continent. This bird has a distinctive buff-colored brow stripe above its eye and forages in the dense, shrubby understory and among vines.

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  • Moth (S. obscura)

    - Scientific name: Synegia obscura
    - Geographic region: Asia
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    The moth Synegia obscura is found in areas of Asia including India, Borneo, the far east and other parts of southeast Asia. It is found in upper elevation mountainous forests.

  • Moth (T. rafflesii)

    - Scientific name: Tanaorhinus rafflesii
    - Geographic region: Asia
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    The moth Tanaorhinus rafflesii is found in areas of Southeast Asia including Burma and Sudanland. It is a large, striking green moth that is found in lowland forested areas, although it has also been found in higher elevations.

  • Blue-and-black tanager

    - Scientific name: Tangara vassorii
    - Geographic region: South America
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    Blue-and-black tanager, Tangara vassorii, is a common bird species found throughout the western side of South America in the Andes mountains. The birds’ range extends from Venezuela south to Bolivia. Blue-and-black tanagers live at higher elevations than other tanager species and forage for fruit and insects in pairs or mixed flocks. They have striking, iridescent blue plumage.

  • Spring dor beetle

    - Scientific name: Trypcopris vernalis
    - Geographic region: Europe
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    Spring dor beetles, Trypcopris vernalis, are found throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, and into Asia. They are a common dung beetle and can range from a metallic blue-black to purple in color. Dung beetles feed on animal feces, and spring dor beetles tend to prefer sheep or fox dung.

  • Olive-backed woodcreeper

    - Scientific name: Xiphorhynchus triangularis
    - Geographic region: South America
    - Status under RCP 4.5: Extinction

    Olive-backed woodcreepers, Xiphorhynchus triangularis, are songbirds that live in the higher elevation forests of the Andes mountains on the northwestern edge of South America from Venezuela in the north to Bolivia in the south. It is the only songbird in its genus that lives exclusively in higher-elevation forests. Olive-backed woodcreepers forage on tree trunks and limbs, creeping and hopping quietly along as woodcreepers are known to do. These birds are hard to spot with their dull brown and olive plumage. You can listen to the Olive-backed woodcreeper at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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