Industries with the biggest dropoff in foot traffic during COVID-19

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May 7, 2020
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Industries with the biggest dropoff in foot traffic during COVID-19

Remember New Year’s Eve 2019? Everyone was toasting to 2020, making jokes that it would be the year to see everything clearly. Who would have imagined that a pandemic would sweep the world, infecting more than three million people, killing more than 200,000 individuals, crashing the stock market, and wreaking havoc in almost every industry? While the term social distancing was not in anyone’s vernacular before the pandemic, people quickly learned its definition, and abided by regulations to stay at home, and stay six feet away from other people when leaving their homes, to help stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. The collective absence of groups of people in the world meant foot traffic would dramatically drop in businesses across the country. Wonder which industries’ foot traffic has been affected the most? Stacker did, and created a slideshow featuring industries with the biggest dropoff in foot traffic so far during COVID-19.

It compiled a list of the industries where business traffic has fallen the most, using data from SafeGraph. The data is an aggregated and privacy-safe summary of foot traffic to six million points of interest in North America, collected from a population sample of smartphone devices from across U.S. demographics and geographies. It was then aggregated by categories or by brands. A total of 197 six-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) industries with a minimum of 10,000 visits the week of March 1 were considered. Change in foot traffic compares the weeks of March 1 and April 12. Total U.S. business foot traffic was down 61.9% during this time.

After identifying the industries and the changes in the weekly foot traffic for the two weeks mentioned above, Stacker looked inside the industry for news and insights that would provide a window into how each industry is reacting to the decline in foot traffic. Keep reading to learn how American industries are reinventing themselves to help their customers and the country in these uncertain times.

Related: How the biggest companies in America are impacted by COVID-19

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RossHelen // Shutterstock

#100. Offices of miscellaneous health practitioners

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -55.7%
- NAICS industry page

The health crisis has required health practitioners like hypnotherapists to pivot where and how they help clients. Many therapists are using teletherapy to talk with their clients from their homes as they both shelter in place. Therapists are reporting stress and exhaustion in this novel paradigm.

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Wusel007 // Wikimedia Commons

#99. Hydroelectric power generation

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -56.7%
- NAICS industry page

Hydroelectric power has been used as an energy source since 1882. As other renewable resources like solar and wind have become more mainstream, the industry as a whole is dominating the energy sector. In a report covered by Ivan Penn of the New York Times April 7, Raymond James analysts projected that this year renewable energy sources would provide 20.7% of U.S. electricity.

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#98. Family planning centers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.2%
- NAICS industry page

Efforts to flatten the curve have led to major restrictions on elective medicine, which includes family planning centers, reproductive health services, and fertility clinics. Following the recommendation of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, to suspend treatment cycles for most patients to prevent complications related to COVID-19, fertility clinics across the United States have halted their operations.

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#97. Floor covering stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.4%
- NAICS industry page

Rug and carpet stores are among the hardest hit of the many businesses deemed “nonessential” by the majority of states. While big box stores that sell carpets and rugs have remained open in many places — some with limitations on certain sections, including carpeting — many specialty dealers and local shops have been forced to close.

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#96. Tobacco stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.5%
- NAICS industry page

It may seem intuitive that cigar and smoke shops have seen a decrease in foot traffic, considering that those with lung damage are more vulnerable to the disease. However, some stores, such as Boyd’s Tobacco & Elegant Gifts in Paso Robles, California, are learning to swerve by operating curbside pickup, enforcing strict social distancing measures, and offering discounts.

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#95. Medical, dental, and hospital equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.7%
- NAICS industry page

The spread of the coronavirus caused a surge in demand for medical supplies, including the coveted N95 respirator masks and ventilators. Online distributors, such as PartSource, are struggling to keep up with the demand, and although foot traffic may be down, sales of respiratory equipment are up more than 1000%, and more than 400% in other areas.

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Pixabay

#94. Retail bakeries

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.8%
- NAICS industry page

Despite everyone’s need for comforting carbs in these unsettling times, retail bakeries have faced major hurdles because many of their clients — restaurants, hotels, cafes, and catering companies — have shut down or decreased service. Boston-based bakery Iggy’s Bread turned to home deliveries and capitalized on social media campaigns to mitigate lost revenue.

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#93. Office supplies and stationery stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -57.9%
- NAICS industry page

With many Americans now working from home, several states have deemed office supply stores like OfficeMax and Staples essential. Smaller stationery stores, such as Little Craft Place in Spring, Texas, are getting creative and offering curbside pickup, surprise boxes, and e-gift cards.

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#92. Employment placement agencies

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.1%
- NAICS industry page

The economic plummet surrounding the pandemic has also led to record levels of unemployment, as more than 26 million Americans are out of work. Despite the bleak hiring landscape, employment agencies remain hopeful that there will be a hiring wave in the future, and encourage jobseekers to look for opportunities in essential services like health care, transport, delivery services, and grocery stores.

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#91. Other personal care services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.2%
- NAICS industry page

Although everyone could all use a little pampering after weeks in quarantine, many personal care services including day spas and tanning salons have had to close their doors. As Georgia leads the states beginning to reopen, President Trump said he did not support Gov. Brian Kemp’s decision to open salons and tattoo parlors.

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#90. All other personal services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.4%
- NAICS industry page

Staying socially distant means that many face-to-face personal service providers, including personal trainers, wedding planners, and fortune tellers, are grappling with major adaptations to their fields. Although personal trainers have pivoted to the digital world to post workout videos on various apps and social platforms, some worry that people will opt to continue at-home training, even when gyms reopen.

 

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#89. Florists

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.5%
- NAICS industry page

As major events like weddings and funerals are being postponed and canceled, the floral industry has suffered major losses. In New York City, the flower district and wholesale markets stay closed, so people are turning to online and telephone services for flowers, and local shops are opening up for deliveries.

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#88. Offices of physical, occupational and speech therapists, and audiologists

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.8%
- NAICS industry page

Physical and occupational therapists have seen major drop-offs in appointments as people do their best to stay at home. Many physical therapists are using telehealth, such as Meredy Parker of Chicago, who predicts that 10% of her appointments will remain online even after the pandemic passes.

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#87. Offices of physicians (except mental health specialists)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -58.9%
- NAICS industry page

Outpatient visits to doctors’ offices have plummeted during the coronavirus crisis, dropping nearly 60% during the month of March. Experts are worried the loss in revenue will force some offices, especially independent practices, to close permanently.

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#86. Investment advice

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -59.3%
- NAICS industry page

The coronavirus has caused chaos in the stock market, keeping financial and investment advisors on their toes. Despite a drop in face-to-face communications, according to The American Institute of CPAs, clients are relying on their financial planners’ advice now more than ever.

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#85. Offices of mental health practitioners (except physicians)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -59.4%
- NAICS industry page

Psychologists and mental health workers have turned to telehealth to continue to care for their clients. And due to the many psychological stresses the pandemic has caused—from losing loved ones to losing a job—many individuals are engaging in therapy for the first time during these troubling times.

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navee sangvitoon // Shutterstock

#84. Refrigeration equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -60%
- NAICS industry page

As restaurants and venues remain closed or operating at limited capacity, it’s no surprise that refrigeration equipment such as soda fountain fixtures and refrigerated display cases aren’t in popular demand. On an even sadder note, during the peak of the coronavirus New York City saw a shortage in refrigeration units and refrigerated trailers at funeral homes and hospital morgues.

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Pixabay

#83. Solar electric power generation

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -60.1%
- NAICS industry page

Electricity use overall is significantly down due to the closing of many businesses across the country. While wind, solar, and coal companies are all suffering, some solar power companies have cut prices down to nearly nothing to attract more customers.

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Barcroft Media // Getty Images

#82. Fruit and vegetable markets

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -60.5%
- NAICS industry page

With the closure and restrictions on restaurants, fruit and vegetable markets have faced major dips in foot traffic and business. Some farmer’s markets are opening up with restrictions akin to those at traditional grocery stores or drive-through shopping only.

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#81. Sewing, needlework, and piece goods stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -60.6%
- NAICS industry page

Many cities are requiring people to wear face masks in public, and since online stores sold out, many people are breaking out their sewing machines and making their own non-medical designer face masks from home. While fabric stores remain in the gray area between “essential” and “nonessential,” many people use whatever cotton fabric they have on hand or buy materials online, if they can find them.

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#80. Baked goods stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -60.8%
- NAICS industry page

Baked goods stores that sell snacks and treats, but not for immediate consumption, are another industry hammered by the closing of restaurants, cafes, schools, and hotels. Portland, Oregon-based cookie company, McTavish Shortbread, stays positive by launching its “Cookies for Caregivers Project,” to give a sweet thanks to frontline workers.

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#79. All other health and personal care stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.1%
- NAICS industry page

Other health stores that offer merchandise such as hearing aids, prosthetics, and convalescent supplies have also seen a drop in foot traffic, as a lot of medical supplies can be purchased online. Though in states where more general medical supplies stores are considered essential, local stores like Affordable Medical Supply in Colorado Springs, Colorado, have sold out of items like face masks, gowns, and thermometers.

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NYCStock // Shutterstock

#78. Free-standing ambulatory surgical and emergency centers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.2%
- NAICS industry page

Many people are avoiding urgent care clinics and trauma centers for fear of contracting COVID-19. To meet the needs of the moment, many urgent care clinics like Urgent Care Now in Sacramento, California, are offering the coronavirus testing in hopes of easing the burden on overwhelmed hospitals.

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Photographee.eu // Shutterstock

#77. Furniture stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.3%
- NAICS industry page

Furniture stores are another industry whose essential status is up for debate. While many Americans are turning to online furniture retailers, many mattress stores remain open, arguing that they provide household consumer products and in many places can be staffed by one employee.

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#76. Wireless telecommunications carriers (except satellite)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.6%
- NAICS industry page

In socially distant times, it’s even more important to stay connected. Despite most storefronts being closed, wireless carriers like T-Mobile and AT&T are offering discounts and relief plans to ease financial burdens.

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#75. Food (health) supplement stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.6%
- NAICS industry page

Though it’s a great time to stock up on immune system boosters, such as vitamin C, many health supplement and vitamin stores have not been able to compete with online options. Industry leaders like GNC have had to lay off significant numbers of workers and freeze all hiring.

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#74. Lessors of nonresidential buildings (except miniwarehouses)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -61.9%
- NAICS industry page

With everyone holed up at home, nonresidential rental properties for events, offices, and retail purposes are way down. Some real estate experts worry that even after the coronavirus crisis passes, companies will downsize their office rentals, after seeing success from working at home.

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Pixabay

#73. Line-haul railroads

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -62.1%
- NAICS industry page

As many businesses close their doors and many consumers are opting to save money rather than purchase nonessential goods, North American rail volumes have seen a decline. Despite a significant drop in demand, industry leaders champion the resilience of the trade and expect a rebound.

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Pixabay

#72. Nature parks and other similar institutions

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -62.2%
- NAICS industry page

Summer is around the corner, and though it would be great to embark on adventures to places like national parks and bird sanctuaries, many nature parks have been forced to close to the public. While it’s unfortunate, wild animals, like the wild bears at Yosemite National Park, celebrate the absence of traffic and crowds.

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#71. Nail salons

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -63%
- NAICS industry page

Nail salons are another nonessential industry that have closed their doors around the country. As states begin to reopen, the business may be changed forever, with some salons planning to have plastic shields for their manicurists.

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#70. Offices of dentists

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -64%
- NAICS industry page

Practicing good dental hygiene has never been more important as dentist offices remain closed as part of the restrictions on elective and nonurgent care. In the future, patients can expect to have their temperatures taken before dental visits and will see less people in the waiting room.

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#69. Snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -64%
- NAICS industry page

Stopping by to grab a snack, ice cream, or coffee from a local shop has become just that, a quick in-and-out visit as opposed to a chance to connect with the nearby community or to work from someplace other than home. Neighborhood coffee shops are fighting to stay afloat, with some like those in South Florida adapting by offering online ordering, selling coffee beans online, or selling gift cards on Amazon to support their baristas.

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#68. All other home furnishings stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -64.2%
- NAICS industry page

Many kitchenware stores, bath shops, and other houseware stores have had to close their storefronts in the past weeks. Though browsing the aisles is off the table, people are opting to browse online for many household items from picture frames to wall decor to coffee mugs. With Mother’s Day coming up, consumers are choosing household gift items more than ever to make sure mom is comfy at home.

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Ben Gabbe // Getty Images

#67. Jewelry stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65%
- NAICS industry page

Jewelry stores are another industry on the rocks, with many of them having had to shut down shop. What’s more? Many jewelry stores who also offer repairs have not been able to return the pieces brought in before the pandemic started, a situation dismayed customers are calling “jewelry jail.”

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#66. Used merchandise stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65.2%
- NAICS industry page

With all the chaos going on in the world, it’s the perfect time to pay it forward. Many individuals are using this time stuck at home to clear out basements and deep clean their living spaces, leading to piles of used goods and clothes they want to donate. While used merchandise stores are closed, in many states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey, places like Goodwill are still able to collect donations.

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originalpunkt // Shutterstock

#65. Service establishment equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65.2%
- NAICS industry page

The service industry as a whole has been greatly impacted by stay at home orders around the nation. This means that the wholesalers who supply equipment to industries such as the janitorial field, beauty parlors, car washes, and dry cleaners are also suffering major losses. Industry leader and nail beauty brand OPI is expressing kindness in the face of adversity by donating hand creams and moisturized gloves to staff at retirement homes and hospitals.

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#64. Optical goods stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65.4%
- NAICS industry page

For everyone not experiencing 20/20 vision this year, it’s likely they’ll have to resort to an online retailer for new specs, as many optical goods stores have been deemed nonessential. Another reason to reach for glasses? The American Academy of Ophthalmology says wearing glasses can prevent people from touching their faces and even act as a shield to keep germs from entering their eyes.

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#63. Confectionery and nut stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65.4%
- NAICS industry page

Even though everyone can use a little sweetness in their lives, candy shops are some of the hardest hit stores in the country. In Louisville, Kentucky, chocolatiers said Easter losses were up to 90% and hoped that with Mother’s Day in sight, people will continue to step up and support local businesses.

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Jeff Greenberg // Getty Images

#62. Sporting goods stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -65.7%
- NAICS industry page

As gyms and other exercise facilities remain closed, the businesses that supply exercise equipment and other sporting goods are also feeling the losses. Kate’s Bait and Sporting Goods in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is a small shop that is adapting to the times with an outdoor vending machine and a walk-up window. Owner Kate Mosley still worries that with lakes and nature parks closed to fishers, hikers and campers, she will continue to lose business.

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Pixabay

#61. Other general government support

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -66.3%
- NAICS industry page

Many human and civil rights commissions are continuing their critical work remotely, despite the closure of their physical offices. The NYC Human Rights Commission launched a specific team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harrassment, after gathering 248 reports of incidents related to the coronavirus since February, 105 of which targeted Asians.

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#60. Exam preparation and tutoring

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -67.1%
- NAICS industry page

As students around the world switch to online learning systems, many require extra attention and help to stay on track with classes. Although face-to-face tutoring centers have had to shut down, the demand for online tutors has surged.

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#59. Cosmetics, beauty supplies, and perfume stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -68.7%
- NAICS industry page

Working remotely and staying at home is a good excuse to skip beauty and makeup routines. Yet even with many cosmetic stores like Ulta and Sephora closing storefronts, the onrush of online orders is putting strains on warehouse workers. At a Sephora warehouse in Las Vegas, employees are taking on additional shifts and some are working 60 hours per week under circumstances one employee describes as “prison-like.”

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#58. Religious organizations

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -68.8%
- NAICS industry page

Many people turn to their faith to get them through trying times. Churches, temples, and mosques have moved many services online or on hold in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Meanwhile some religious organizations are getting more creative, like First Grace Church in Ohio, where services are being held in the parking lot and members are encouraged to honk their horns to signal “amen.”

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#57. Fine arts schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -69%
- NAICS industry page

With public and private schools closed for the remainder of the year in many states, most nonacademic fine arts schools like dance studios, music conservatories, art classes, and theater troupes are also closed for the season. Many programs are keeping the arts alive by offering online instruction.

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#56. Parking lots and garages

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -69.2%
- NAICS industry page

Parking lots and garages are seeing a nearly 70% drop in foot traffic, as most people are stuck at home, and many restaurants and shopping centers remain closed. Some garages, such as those at the Jacksonville International Airport in Florida, are consolidating parking by closing economy lots and reducing the cost for regular lots.

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Education Images // Getty Images

#55. Department stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -70%
- NAICS industry page

Department stores, which have been in decline for the past decade, are some of the hardest hit retailers during this crisis, because they are incredibly dependent on their in-store sales. With industry names like Lord & Taylor letting go of its entire executive team and Neiman Marcus anticipated to declare bankruptcy, experts worry if they will be able to stay afloat.

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#54. Household appliance stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -70.4%
- NAICS industry page

Many people are hesitant to make a high-cost purchase such as a new kitchen appliance in these financially-uncertain times. Yet there is one appliance that is in high demand: freezers. By the first week in April, Coastal Appliance in Brunswick, Georgia, saw freezers sell out, as people prepared to store more food.

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#53. Offices of optometrists

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -70.5%
- NAICS industry page

Another field included in nonurgent and elective health care is optometry. While many offices have closed, optometrists are adjusting by offering eye care through telemedicine. Except for extreme cases where a patient must come in, Dr. Michael Christensen of New York says evaluations and treatment have been successful online.

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#52. Musical instrument and supplies stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.1%
- NAICS industry page

Lockdowns from the pandemic have closed music stores across the nation. Amoeba Music in Berkeley, California, launched a fundraising campaign, in hopes of keeping the 30-year-old store afloat amid the crisis.

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#51. All other miscellaneous store retailers (except tobacco stores)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.2%
- NAICS industry page

While shopping centers remain closed, the country continues to sort which retail goods are truly essential. While candle shops and hot tub stores may not have made the cut, one retailer type that some states have deemed essential is medical marijuana stores. Though most stores have switched to curbside pickup and delivery, cannabis advocates believe this moment could be an optimal one to normalize the industry.

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#50. Other grantmaking and giving services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.3%
- NAICS industry page

Emergency cash grants for college students are available through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. More than $12 billion was made available to make sure that learning continues throughout the country.

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#49. Gift, novelty, and souvenir stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.4%
- NAICS industry page

Looking to send a gift to someone to celebrate their quarantine birthday, anniversary, or new baby? Although most gift and novelty shops are closed due to the pandemic, shoppers can safely buy someone a bespoke gift, like a curated gift box or journal, online.

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#48. Full-service restaurants

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.7%
- NAICS industry page

Restaurants across the country have had to close or completely change the way they were doing business. CNN reported that 59% of Chinese restaurants appear to have closed their operations, as they stopped showing debit and credit card activity.

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#47. Automobile driving schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -71.7%
- NAICS industry page

The Department of Transportation has stopped in-person appointments due to the coronavirus, causing many teens to put the brakes on their plans to get licenses. However, 1st Geer Driving School in Bismarck, North Dakota, is helping teens progress via a waiver that circumvents the in-person restrictions.

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#46. Women's clothing stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -72.3%
- NAICS industry page

Remember trying on clothes in dressing rooms and finding a beautiful blouse at a pop-up event in your favorite women’s boutique? While women’s clothing stories were deemed nonessential and closed during the pandemic, many shoppers went online to buy clothes. As shop owners begin to open their doors, they’re excited to be doing so, even though there will be new shopping experiences that include social distancing.

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#45. All other amusement and recreation industries

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -72.8%
- NAICS industry page

While online entertainment is available around the clock, many people are eager to enjoy familiar recreational activities, like mini golf, archery, and pool, that may be closed due to COVID-19. Matt Baysinger of Kansas City, Missouri used his entrepreneurial spirit to create Sinkers at Home, a mini-golf course kit that features 36 unique hole designs and a new course every week of the coronavirus pandemic.

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#44. Diet and weight reducing centers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -73%
- NAICS industry page

Add stress to being under lockdown with difficult access to healthy food, and it equals a recipe for weight gain, especially for people struggling with weight issues. Although many weight loss centers remain closed due to the coronavirus, WW has pivoted to inviting members to Zoom virtual workshops for support.

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#43. Interurban and rural bus transportation

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -73.4%
- NAICS industry page

Local tourism in the United States came to a bitter halt as people were mandated to shelter in place. Streets typically teeming with motor coaches full of tourists have been empty since the coronavirus eclipsed daily life. Tourism officials are awaiting decisions on when and how they can welcome tourists.

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#42. Wineries

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -73.5%
- NAICS industry page

Wineries are facing a multitude of challenges as the coronavirus makes its way around the globe. Along with vineyards having to contend with whether local governments will permit their employees to work safely to yield their harvests, many bars and restaurants that serve their products have closed. A new direct-to-consumer trend is evolving. Cheers to good health!

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#41. Hobby, toy, and game stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -73.6%
- NAICS industry page

Although toy shops can pivot to selling online, the stores that rely on interactive experiences to sell toys are being hit especially hard by the pandemic. Oregon’s Piccolo Mondo Toys, with stores in Hillsboro and Beaverton, got creative and is partnering with the community to help children in need.

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#40. Passenger car rental

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -74.1%
- NAICS industry page

The coronavirus has put the brakes on car rental sales. No business travel plus no pleasure travel equals no business for the car rental companies. Rental companies are planning to reduce their fleet sizes as part of a strategy to lower expenses.

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#39. Art dealers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -75.1%
- NAICS industry page

Art dealers have had to be creative to keep their businesses going during the coronavirus. In Los Angeles, art dealers galvanized to launch their own website and virtual gallery, naming it the Gallery Association Los Angeles.

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#38. Child day care services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -75.2%
- NAICS industry page

Parents with children in day care centers wonder whether they need to keep paying the bill even if the day care center is closed due to the pandemic. A variety of factors weigh into the decision, including state laws, individual contract terms, and the family’s financial situation.

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#37. Hotels (except casino hotels) and motels

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -75.3%
- NAICS industry page

Hotel guests can expect a new level of cleanliness when they return to properties post-pandemic. The industry, hit hard by the coronavirus, will be elevating its commitment to cleanliness, with offerings like the recently-announced Hilton CleanStay program.

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#36. Regulation and administration of transportation programs

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -76%
- NAICS industry page

The entire transportation industry has been impacted by the pandemic, as flights are canceled and fewer people are on the road. Included in this industry are the government establishments that administer, regulate, license, inspect, plan, and investigate transportation services, like motor vehicle registration offices, public transit commissions, and port authorities. With $25 billion allocated for federal transit assistance through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, some states like Virginia are putting significant amounts toward public transit agencies.

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#35. Children's and infants' clothing stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -76.4%
- NAICS industry page

The owners of children’s clothing stores, like most retailers across the country, have had to shift their business paradigm to stay afloat during the pandemic. Curbside pickup has helped stores like Giggles in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, stay in business: Owner Whitney Coleman reported healthy sales for Easter and noted that she may keep curbside pick post-pandemic for parents who like to have their kids stay in the car.

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Fernanda Calfat // Getty Images

#34. Book stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -76.6%
- NAICS industry page

Did you know that a recent market research firm estimates that there has been a record 777% increase in online book sales since the onset of the coronavirus? If customers don’t want their local bookstore to have its last chapter named COVID-19, they can support it in a few ways, including buying books online and participating in online readings and chats with authors.

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#33. Breweries

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -77.1%
- NAICS industry page

State restrictions and closures of bars, restaurants, and pubs due to COVID-19 have created unprecedented challenges for breweries throughout the country. In Minnesota, the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild estimates that breweries have lost more than $9 million in revenue, perhaps even more.

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#32. Cafeterias, grill buffets, and buffets

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -77.5%
- NAICS industry page

Could COVID-19 mark the end of the line for the self-serve buffet? As restaurants begin to open, federal regulations are requiring that they discontinue salad bars, buffets, and beverage stations where customers have to share utensils.

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#31. RV (recreational vehicle) parks and campgrounds

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -77.9%
- NAICS industry page

Families that planned to visit campgrounds and RV resorts this summer should check the state’s regulations amid the coronavirus pandemic. While the grounds may be used for people who reside there permanently or are temporarily sheltering-in-place, many private and public campgrounds are closed for recreational purposes.

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Tobias Arhelger // Shutterstock

#30. Language schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -78.7%
- NAICS industry page

Language schools, like many private and public schools, have been forced to close due to COVID-19. People eager to learn a new language have a lot of options online; some of them are free.

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Bennett Raglin // Getty Images

#29. Historical sites

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -78.7%
- NAICS industry page

While people have resisted going to visit historical sites and landmarks during the pandemic, many are wondering when sites and landmarks will reopen. It looks as though it will be wait-and-see for many sites, such as New York’s Statue of Liberty and the American Museum of Natural History.

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Thiti Sukapan // Shutterstock

#28. Sporting and athletic goods manufacturing

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -79.3%
- NAICS industry page

With sporting games canceled and brick-and-mortar stores closed, businesses who sell sporting goods have been gravely impacted, as have the manufacturers who make the equipment sold in these stores. The World Federation of the Sporting Goods Industry, a group whose 370 direct company members include brands like Nike and manufacturers like Giant bicycles, is conducting a monthly survey to help the industry navigate these trying times.

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#27. Shoe stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -79.9%
- NAICS industry page

Shoe stores, whose weekly business plummeted almost 80%, are putting one foot in front of the other to remain in business. Little’s Shoes has been outfitting shoes for Pittsburgh families for more than a century and has exclusively sold shoes in person. Due to the coronavirus, the store had to get help from the Paycheck Protection Program, and had to pivot to learn to sell shoes on social media and on the phone.

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Juan Carlos Toro // Getty Images

#26. Fitness and recreational sports centers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -80.8%
- NAICS industry page

The $94 billion fitness industry has been reshaped by the pandemic. Fitness enthusiasts looking for their daily dose of endorphins have turned to online classes, outdoor exercise, and renting or buying equipment for their homes. Weight training equipment sales have soared 307%, according to a market research report.

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#25. Other clothing stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -81%
- NAICS industry page

Thanks to the rise of quarantine brides due to the coronavirus, more and more of them are now saying, “I do,” to buying their dresses online. As the coronavirus hit, online wedding dress company Anomalie saw its sales skyrocket. In March, it saw its registration for an online wedding dress sketch jump to 1,500 requests and after a video went viral, the company had 20,000 sign-ups in one day.

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Noam Galai // Getty Images

#24. Museums

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -82.1%
- NAICS industry page

Museums around the world have been forced to close their doors, with the change in weekly business plummeting more than 80% in the United States. Some of the inventive ways museums are trying to keep people engaged include virtual visits, interactive experiences, and online journeys.

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#23. Libraries and archives

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -82.9%
- NAICS industry page

It is a new chapter for libraries across the country since COVID-19 changed the narrative. The El Dorado County Library in California has been helping the community by using its 3D printer to produce face shields for health care employees. Other libraries are creating Zoom storytimes and using their bookmobiles to create WiFi hot spots in parking lots.

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#22. Drinking places (alcoholic beverages)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -83.6%
- NAICS industry page

The pandemic has taken its toll on bars, restaurants, and pubs, where enjoying a drink in person is a major part of the experience and profit. Mixing drinks at home is a new pastime, inspired online by mixologists sharing recipes and tips and creating great images for social media.

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#21. Men's clothing stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -83.8%
- NAICS industry page

With foot traffic down more than 83%, many men’s stores find themselves with warehouses brimming with clothes for spring and summer. Griff Goods, a men’s clothing store in Alabama, has pivoted to making masks from sustainable fabric. The cost of one mask pays for another to be given to a health care worker.

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#20. Child and youth services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -84.6%
- NAICS industry page

With child and youth services suspended due to COVID-19, there is a growing concern that child abuse is on the rise and is being underreported. Organizations that help vulnerable children try to remain vigilant through virtual meetings and communication.

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#19. Bowling centers

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -85.6%
- NAICS industry page

While bowling alleys were on the list of nonessential businesses for many states, some Southern states including Georgia and Tennessee are allowing them to open as restrictions are lifted. 

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Luca Santilli // Shutterstock

#18. Other technical and trade schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -86%
- NAICS industry page

While online classes are a great learning tool, some trades just can’t be taught remotely, like learning how to drive a truck. Federal regulators recently issued 3-month waivers for those with learner permits during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Sorbis // Shutterstock

#17. Family clothing stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -86.8%
- NAICS industry page

Family clothing stores that had to close during the coronavirus may be faced with staffing challenges as the economy opens. On April 26, Business Bridge noted that Samantha Farley, who runs two family-owned clothing stores in Michigan, had to lay off five employees and was uncertain what the summer will hold.

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#16. Cosmetology and barber schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -86.9%
- NAICS industry page

As Georgia began reopening the economy on April 24, The Georgia State Board of Cosmetology and Barbers issued a set of guidelines. Some of the restrictions include screening workers for fevers, social distancing, stringent cleanings, donning gloves and a mask, and working 6 feet apart.

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#15. Amusement and theme parks

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -87.3%
- NAICS industry page

Reports from the Financial Times note that after Walt Disney World furloughed employees on April 19, the company is saving $500 million a month. The entertainment goliath still loses money, possibly between $20 million and $30 million a day. When Disney opens its doors post-pandemic, new guidelines including temperature screenings may be implemented.

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The Boston Globe // Getty Images

#14. Other airport operations

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -87.8%
- NAICS industry page

Now is not the time to travel. Airports are empty. Not only does that impact the airlines, but all the other services engaged at the airport, from baggage handling to runway maintenance and aviation clubs. Many of those personnel are laid off.

 

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#13. Amusement arcades

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -88.3%
- NAICS industry page

No fun! The pandemic has forced many arcades and indoor play areas to shut down for the time being. With their doors closed to the public, more than 30 virtual reality arcades are paying it forward, and lending their powerful computers to a research project aiming to develop COVID-19 treatments.

 

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#12. Colleges, universities, and professional schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -89.9%
- NAICS industry page

Administrators, professors, students and staffers are wondering how the coronavirus will change higher education. Although colleges have received about $14 billion in relief, it is still far less than what they need to face the education crisis resulting from the pandemic.

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#11. Junior colleges

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -90.2%
- NAICS industry page

The coronavirus pandemic has caused many graduating seniors to rethink their college decisions, creating a possible surge in the popularity of community colleges. The close-to-home college choice may align with students’ needs to avoid dorm life and travel.

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#10. Casinos (except casino hotels)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -90.7%
- NAICS industry page

Three weeks after Nevada’s Gov. Steve Sisolak shut down all essential businesses on March 17, casinos, the state’s most popular industry, reported huge losses. Meanwhile gamblers have switched to online options like SugarHouse Casino, where new registrants have grown 20% as brick-and-mortar casinos closed.

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Natalia Lebedinskaia // Shutterstock

#9. Elementary and secondary schools

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -92%
- NAICS industry page

NPR noted that with 75% of states closing schools for the remainder of the year, students continue to learn remotely, and questions loom about what a fall reopening will look like. Experts noted key ideas for reopening may include enhanced hygiene and health measures, smaller class sizes, staggered schedules, new calendars, and continued remote learning.

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#8. Motion picture theaters (except drive-ins)

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -92.1%
- NAICS industry page

While it’s been lights out at movie theaters during the coronavirus, one analyst predicts that the pandemic may have a bright side for cinemas once states begin to reopen. People may opt to go to the movies during the week to avoid crowded theaters, boosting attendance during that time period.

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#7. Educational support services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -93.2%
- NAICS industry page

Student exchange programs were abruptly curtailed due to the coronavirus, creating more pandemonium amidst the pandemic. Many students were sent back to their country of origin as U.S. citizens were sheltering in place. Along with improving their English-speaking skills and experiencing American life, the international students were looking forward to rites of passage like prom and spring break.

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#6. Casino hotels

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -93.5%
- NAICS industry page

It isn’t a gamble to bet that hotel casinos will take awhile to recover from the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. In a recent interview with CNBC, Hard Rock’s Chairman Jim Allen said that he thinks it will take a year to ramp up business. He points to a 12% occupancy rate at the recently-reopened Hard Rock Hotel Shenzhen as a picture of how challenging it may be in the future.

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Sorbis // Shutterstock

#5. Luggage and leather goods stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -93.8%
- NAICS industry page

It makes sense that during a pandemic the last thing on anyone’s mind would be buying a suitcase, and so luggage stores fell under the nonessential category when states were closing businesses. Luggage and leather store owners were among retailers in South Carolina reopening the week of April 27.

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#4. Other individual and family services

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -95%
- NAICS industry page

It is no wonder that couples spending 24 hours together daily need help managing stress and relationship issues. Although most therapists are not seeing patients in their offices, they are offering services remotely, scheduling video meetings with their clients in the privacy of their homes or cars.

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#3. Sports teams and clubs

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -95%
- NAICS industry page

Since March 11 when the NBA suspended basketball games, fans have been awaiting news about when they will be able to watch their beloved teams play. California’s Gov. Gavin Newsom recently noted that fan-attended baseball does not seem realistic this summer and football in the fall is also hard to imagine. Teams are in the midst of figuring out how to cover ticket refunds and lost revenue.

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Apple_Mac // Shutterstock

#2. Clothing accessories stores

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -95.1%
- NAICS industry page

Although clothing accessory stores had to close due to health regulations and the lack of demand, some shops have gotten creative at this unprecedented time. Route One Apparel, located in Maryland, pivoted and began selling face masks. The shop has sold more than 10,000 masks, and after Gov. Larry Hogan was seen sporting one of the masks at a press conference, even more orders are being placed.

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Ezra Shaw // Getty Images

#1. Skiing facilities

- Change in weekly business foot traffic: -95.5%
- NAICS industry page

As the coronavirus spread and spring temperatures rose, activity at the top of ski mountains went downhill faster than alpine Olympic ski racer Bode Miller. There are at least two ski areas — Arapahoe Basin and Aspen Highlands in Colorado — that are hoping authorities allow them to open before the entire season melts away. They are keeping their mountains ready in case Gov. Jared Polis and local officials give them a green light to reopen.

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