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Racial breakdown of COVID-19 cases in every state

Racial breakdown of COVID-19 cases in every state

Although viruses don’t discriminate, humans do, and the conditions created over years of racial and ethnic discrimination have led to a discrepancy when it comes to who is infected and who suffers from it the most. In order to better understand how different racial and ethnic groups are experiencing COVID-19, the COVID Racial Data Tracker has compiled race and ethnicity data reported by state health departments and organized these data into standardized labels.

Forty-eight states and Washington D.C. report demographic data, and neither Nebraska nor North Dakota reports. In New York, New York City reports its data separately from the rest of the state; the COVID Tracking Project combined these figures.

Stacker has taken the data from the COVID Tracking Project and included total demographic data for each state from the 2018 American Community Survey estimates and the number of deaths in each state via the COVID Tracking Project to give context. For states with lower case and death counts, race figures may suffer from the law of small numbers. Some states categorize the Hispanic or Latinx population as a racial group, while some categorize it as an ethnic group; in this story, we have standardized to the same combined categories (white alone, Black alone, Asian alone, Hispanic or Latino, etc.) used by the COVID Tracking Project.

Unsurprisingly, based on the COVID Tracking Project Data, minority groups in most states are experiencing higher rates of COVID-19. This is due to a number of reasons. These groups are more likely to have jobs that don’t allow them to stay home and socially distance. In addition, these communities experience health disparities that lead to higher rates of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and COPD.

The data in this piece are up-to-date as of May 31, 2020. While numbers of cases rise every day, and increased testing will likely change the rates of infection and death by race and ethnicity, these data show important patterns and deep-seated issues when it comes to rates of COVID-19 infection and death around the country.

Editor's note: Betsy Ladyzhets, a research associate at Stacker who worked on this story, volunteers for the COVID-19 Tracking Project.

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Alabama

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 4.9 million total population, 17,903 cases, 631 deaths
- White alone: 65.4% of state population, 37.6% of cases, 50.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 26.8% of state population, 41.3% of cases, 44.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 4.4% of state population, 8.8% of cases, 1.9% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.5% of state population, 0.5% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 16.4% of cases, 4.1% of deaths

In Alabama, Black and African American residents make up just 26.8% of the state’s population yet are the victims of 44% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths. Due to systemic racism, Black Americans have higher incidence of the kinds of underlying conditions that make people most susceptible to the virus. In addition, Alabama is one of 14 states that did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, meaning fewer people are able to access health insurance and health care.

[Pictured: Exterior view of Captain D's advertising alternate methods of ordering during the coronavirus outbreak on March 23 in Montgomery.]

Alaska

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 738,516 total population, 434 cases, 10 deaths
- White alone: 60.3% of state population, 59.6% of cases, 50.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 3.8% of state population, 2.8% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 7.2% of state population, 8.7% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 6.6% of state population, 10.0% of cases, 20.0% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 15.4% of state population, 8.9% of cases, 20.0% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 1.4% of state population, 3.3% of cases, 10.0% of deaths
- Unknown: 9.3% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

Alaska does not have racial data relating to COVID-19 deaths. However, it does have racial data on the number of cases, and three minority groups are experiencing disproportionately high numbers of cases: Hispanic/Latinx, Asian alone, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. Native Americans or Alaska Natives, who are disproportionately represented in other states, surprisingly make up 15.4% of Alaska’s population but 8.9% of cases. However, the ACLU sent a letter to Alaska’s governor and department of health asking for better data including death rates by race.

Arizona

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.9 million total population, 19,936 cases, 906 deaths
- White alone: 54.4% of state population, 24.9% of cases, 49.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 5.1% of state population, 3.7% of cases, 3.2% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 31.6% of state population, 23.7% of cases, 15.7% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.7% of state population, 1.0% of cases, 1.3% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 5.3% of state population, 14.9% of cases, 18.8% of deaths
- Unknown: 29.1% of cases, 10.5% of deaths

One group that is experiencing the impacts of COVID-19 most acutely is Native Americans. This is especially true in Arizona, where Native Americans or Alaska Natives make up only 5.3% of the total population yet 18.8% of deaths. Arizona is home to a large part of the Navajo Nation, land that spans the northeast area of Arizona along with pieces of New Mexico and Utah. The Navajo Nation is being heavily impacted by the virus; in fact, as of May 18, it passed New York State for the highest rates of COVID-19 per capita in the United States.

Arkansas

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.0 million total population, 7,253 cases, 133 deaths
- White alone: 72.2% of state population, 47.7% of cases, 57.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 15.7% of state population, 32.7% of cases, 34.6% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 7.7% of state population, 14.2% of cases, 3.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.7% of state population, 1.0% of cases, 0.8% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.0% of state population, 0.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.4% of state population, 4.1% of cases, 2.3% of deaths
- Unknown: 7.4% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

Black and African American people make up only 15.7% of Arkansas’s population yet 32.7% of cases and 34.6% of deaths. Dr. William Greenfield of the Arkansas Department of Health attributed some of this to the socioeconomic status of the Black and African American communities, and that they are more likely to work jobs where social distancing isn’t possible.

California

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 39.1 million total population, 110,583 cases, 4,213 deaths
- White alone: 36.8% of state population, 14.3% of cases, 31.6% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 6.5% of state population, 3.7% of cases, 9.4% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 39.3% of state population, 38.8% of cases, 36.7% of deaths
- Asian alone: 15.3% of state population, 6.5% of cases, 14.0% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.6% of state population, 0.1% of cases, 0.3% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.5% of state population, 0.6% of cases, 0.7% of deaths
- Unknown: 28.9% of cases, 5.9% of deaths

While California is one of the states with the highest number of cases due to its large population, it has done relatively well per capita, due to quick action and early quarantine measures. The data from the COVID-19 Tracker doesn’t show a huge disparity in deaths by race, but when it comes to the Latinx community, experts warn that the data might be skewed because the population tends to be younger. In addition, it is worth noting that the number of cases for Black and African American residents is 3.7%, their death rate is more than double that—9.4%.

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Colorado

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 5.5 million total population, 26,098 cases, 1,443 deaths
- White alone: 67.9% of state population, 34.1% of cases, 63.6% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 4.6% of state population, 5.8% of cases, 6.7% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 21.7% of state population, 36.9% of cases, 19.4% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.5% of state population, 2.6% of cases, 3.7% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.6% of state population, 0.5% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.2% of state population, 0.4% of cases, 0.4% of deaths
- Unknown: 18.1% of cases, 4.4% of deaths

Colorado’s Latinx population is 21.7%, and while the rate of COVID-19 deaths among the population is roughly proportional at 19.4%, its infection rate is disproportionately high at 36.9%. In Denver, Latinx people make up almost half of all COVID-19 cases, despite being just 29.7% of the city’s population, according to Denver Public Health via Denverite reporting on May 1. Latinx people also make up the majority of Denver’s hospitalizations.

Connecticut

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.6 million total population, 42,201 cases, 3,944 deaths
- White alone: 66.5% of state population, 33.8% of cases, 73.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 12.0% of state population, 12.7% of cases, 14.8% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 16.5% of state population, 17.6% of cases, 8.6% of deaths
- Asian alone: 4.9% of state population, 1.4% of cases, 0.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 33.6% of cases, 1.7% of deaths

In Connecticut, the real issue with the racial data in the state is what is left out: information about Native American populations. Unlike for other states, the COVID-19 Tracker data does not have any section for Native American or Alaska Native. Only 1% of the state’s population is Native American, yet there is no data available for their rates of infection and death, in spite of the fact that these populations have been experiencing disproportionately high infection and death rates in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, the race of 33.6% of Connecticut’s infections is “unknown.”

Delaware

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 949,495 total population, 9,498 cases, 366 deaths
- White alone: 61.9% of state population, 28.7% of cases, 60.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 23.0% of state population, 26.5% of cases, 26.5% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 9.5% of state population, 27.6% of cases, 6.3% of deaths
- Asian alone: 0.0% of state population, 1.5% of cases, 0.3% of deaths
- Unknown: 10.6% of cases, 5.7% of deaths

Delaware’s Black and African American population is experiencing a slightly disproportionately high infection and death rate. While they make up 23% of the state’s population, they make up 26.5% of the state’s cases and 26.5% of its death. In addition, while the Hispanic and Latinx community actually have a slightly low death rate—6.3% of the state’s total in comparison with being 9.5% of its population—it has a very high infection rate: 27.6%. Communities of color in the state experience higher rates of diabetes and heart disease along with higher likelihood of unemployment or incarceration.

District of Columbia

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 684,498 total population, 8,801 cases, 466 deaths
- White alone: 37.1% of state population, 15.3% of cases, 11.2% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 46.4% of state population, 46.6% of cases, 74.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 11.3% of state population, 26.5% of cases, 11.6% of deaths
- Asian alone: 4.4% of state population, 1.2% of cases, 1.5% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.6% of state population, 0.3% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 11.0% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

In our nation’s capital, the people hit hardest by COVID-19 are without a doubt those in the Black or African American community. They make up 46.4% of the population and a proportional 46.6% of its cases, yet they make up 74.9% of its deaths. Washington D.C., while a diverse city as a whole, is very segregated between its neighborhoods. The majority Black neighborhoods were already experiencing poorer health outcomes, making them more vulnerable to COVID-19.

Florida

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 20.6 million total population, 56,163 cases, 2,534 deaths
- White alone: 53.5% of state population, 27.2% of cases, 50.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 16.9% of state population, 19.2% of cases, 21.2% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 26.1% of state population, 34.9% of cases, 22.2% of deaths
- Unknown: 15.0% of cases, 3.3% of deaths

Florida’s Black and African American population make up 16.9% of the population yet constitute 19.2% of cases and 21.2% of deaths. However, in some parts of Florida, the discrepancy is even starker. In Escambia County as of May 22, 36% of cases were in African Americans, even though they only make up 22% of the county’s population. In addition, in that county, 50% of hospitalizations and 50% of deaths were African Americans.

[Pictured: An aerial drone view shows Robert "Raven" Kraft running alone on the closed beach after being granted special permission by city officials on May 27 in Miami Beach.]

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Georgia

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 10.3 million total population, 46,986 cases, 2,042 deaths
- White alone: 52.4% of state population, 24.8% of cases, 44.6% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 32.4% of state population, 32.0% of cases, 48.8% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 9.8% of state population, 12.6% of cases, 4.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 4.3% of state population, 1.4% of cases, 1.5% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.5% of state population, 0.1% of cases, 0.1% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.1% of cases, 0.2% of deaths
- Unknown: 27.0% of cases, 0.5% of deaths

In Georgia, African American and Black people are dying from COVID-19 at a disproportionate rate. Although they only make up 32.4% of the population and 32% of cases, they constitute nearly half of all deaths in the state. In addition, a May 2020 study from the Morehouse School of Medicine found that the higher the percentage of Black or African American people in a particular county, the higher the rate of COVID-19.

Hawaii

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.4 million total population, 651 cases, 17 deaths
- White alone: 21.8% of state population, 30.7% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 2.2% of state population, 0.9% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 10.7% of state population, cases data not available, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 37.6% of state population, 34.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 10.2% of state population, 16.7% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 7.2% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

Hawaii has been largely successful in keeping its number of cases relatively low, due to early enforcement of social distancing. The state currently does not have racial data on COVID-19 deaths, but it does have case data. Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders together make up 10.2% of the population and constitute a slightly disproportionate 16.7% of cases. However, in other states in the continental United States, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are suffering at a much higher disproportionate rate.

Idaho

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.7 million total population, 2,839 cases, 82 deaths
- White alone: 81.7% of state population, 51.4% of cases, 96.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 9.0% of state population, 1.6% of cases, 1.2% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 12.7% of state population, 21.2% of cases, 4.9% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.6% of state population, 1.5% of cases, 2.4% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.7% of state population, 1.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.2% of state population, 0.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 28.3% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

Unlike many other states, Idaho’s white alone population has experienced a disproportionate number of COVID-19 deaths. They make up 81.7% of the population and 96.3% of the deaths. Although the state’s Hispanic or Latinx population has a disproportionately low death rate—4.9% of deaths and 12.7% of the population—they do have a disproportionately high number of cases at 21.2%. As of May 22, cases in the state spiked to a seven-week high.

Illinois

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 12.8 million total population, 120,260 cases, 5,390 deaths
- White alone: 61.0% of state population, 19.5% of cases, 43.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 14.6% of state population, 16.6% of cases, 29.5% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 17.4% of state population, 31.4% of cases, 19.5% of deaths
- Asian alone: 5.9% of state population, 2.9% of cases, 4.8% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 6.0% of state population, 0.2% of cases, 0.1% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.2% of cases, 0.1% of deaths
- Unknown: 25.6% of cases, 0.7% of deaths

In Illinois, the Black and African American population has experienced a high proportion of deaths at 29.5% despite being only 14.6% of the state’s population. In Chicago, the state’s largest city, this problem is especially acute. While Black and African American people make up only 30% of the city’s population, they have, as of May 24, made up 60% of the city’s deaths.

[Pictured: A view from the 360 Chicago observation deck shows a nearly empty Lake Shore Drive and a deserted lakefront on May 12 in Chicago.]

Indiana

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.6 million total population, 34,574 cases, 2,134 deaths
- White alone: 78.9% of state population, 42.8% of cases, 64.7% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 9.8% of state population, 13.1% of cases, 15.1% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 7.1% of state population, 11.4% of cases, 1.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 2.5% of state population, 1.4% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 25.6% of cases, 7.5% of deaths

Indiana’s African American and Black population currently make up 15.1% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths even though they make up only 9.8% of the population. In Marion County, where Indianapolis is the county seat, African Americans are twice as likely to die from the virus as white residents.

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Iowa

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.1 million total population, 19,552 cases, 534 deaths
- White alone: 85.3% of state population, 58.0% of cases, 76.8% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 4.0% of state population, 11.0% of cases, 4.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 6.2% of state population, 26.0% of cases, 6.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 2.7% of state population, 9.0% of cases, 4.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 0.0% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

In Iowa, Hispanic or Latinx people make up 6.2% of the population but are 26% of cases, and people who identify as Asian alone make up just 2.7% of the population but 9% of all COVID-19 cases. And while the Black and African American population makes up just 4% of the population, they make up 11% of all cases. To help reach the Hispanic/Latinx community, the Department of Community and Behavioral Health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health developed targeted outreach videos in Spanish.

[Pictured: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City.]

Kansas

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 2.9 million total population, 9,719 cases, 208 deaths
- White alone: 75.7% of state population, 61.7% of cases, 66.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 6.1% of state population, 9.9% of cases, 28.4% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 12.1% of state population, 43.0% of cases, 10.1% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.1% of state population, 6.2% of cases, 1.9% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.2% of state population, 0.5% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 19.1% of cases, 2.4% of deaths

Kansas’s African American/Black and Hispanic/Latinx populations are being disproportionately hit by COVID-19. African American/Black Kansans make up just 6.1% of the population yet 10.4% of cases and 31.5% of all deaths—nearly a third. And while the Hispanic/Latinx population makes up just 12.1% of the state’s population, they make up 40.9% of the cases. In fact, per UC-Berkeley data, it’s such a big disparity that Kansas is currently seeing the largest racial disparity in the whole country when it comes to COVID-19 deaths.

Kentucky

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 4.4 million total population, 9,704 cases, 431 deaths
- White alone: 84.3% of state population, 52.4% of cases, 70.8% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 8.4% of state population, 10.4% of cases, 15.8% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 3.8% of state population, 10.4% of cases, 2.1% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.6% of state population, 3.7% of cases, 1.4% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 3.0% of state population, 0.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 29.5% of cases, 10.7% of deaths

In Kentucky, African American and Black residents make up 15.8% of the state’s deaths even though they are just 8.4% of the population. In late April, the state opened up more testing sites in African American communities.

Louisiana

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 4.7 million total population, 39,916 cases, 2,791 deaths
- White alone: 58.6% of state population, cases data not available, 41.5% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 32.7% of state population, cases data not available, 52.6% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 5.2% of state population, cases data not available, 1.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.8% of state population, cases data not available, 0.8% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.8% of state population, cases data not available, 0.1% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, cases data not available, 0.1% of deaths
- Unknown: 100.0% of cases, 4.3% of deaths

Louisiana’s data for the racial breakdown of COVID-19 in the state does not include the number of cases, but it does include the number of deaths, which is disproportionately high for Black and African American residents. While they only make up 32.7% of the population, they have so far accounted for over half of the deaths. Much of this is due to decades of air pollution in areas where these communities live. Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley”—an 85-mile stretch between New Orleans and Baton Rouge where residential areas are lined with refineries and petrochemical plants—has experienced extremely disproportionate COVID-19 deaths.

Maine

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.3 million total population, 2,325 cases, 89 deaths
- White alone: 93.1% of state population, 56.0% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 1.6% of state population, 15.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 1.7% of state population, 2.6% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 1.2% of state population, 1.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.0% of state population, 0.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 25.0% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

In Maine, racial data is not available for deaths but is available for cases. For the Black/African American community, there is a stark discrepancy between their representation in the population as a whole versus the percentage of cases they represent. While Black/African American residents make up only 1.6% of Maine’s population, they make up 15.1% of the state’s total cases. Nirav Shah, the director of Maine’s Center for Disease Control, attributes this discrepancy to the overrepresentation of minorities in low-paying or frontline jobs where they are not able to social distance.

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Maryland

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.0 million total population, 52,778 cases, 2,532 deaths
- White alone: 50.5% of state population, 19.5% of cases, 42.5% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 30.9% of state population, 28.8% of cases, 40.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 10.4% of state population, 25.3% of cases, 9.2% of deaths
- Asian alone: 6.7% of state population, 1.9% of cases, 3.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 19.4% of cases, 2.3% of deaths

While the number of Black/African American residents in Maryland have a representative number of COVID-19 cases when compared to their representation in the total population, their number of deaths is disproportionately high, with 40.9% despite only making up 30.9% of the population. There are a number of reasons, but one that was highlighted in a late-May New York Times article is that nursing homes with more Latinx and Black populations are seeing a worse standard of care. One nursing home in Baltimore gave the staff rain ponchos to use as protection.

Massachusetts

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.8 million total population, 96,965 cases, 6,846 deaths
- White alone: 71.4% of state population, 26.1% of cases, 41.8% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 8.9% of state population, 9.0% of cases, 5.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 12.3% of state population, 18.7% of cases, 6.3% of deaths
- Asian alone: 7.1% of state population, 1.9% of cases, 1.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 39.8% of cases, 41.7% of deaths

In Massachusetts, Hispanic/Latinx residents are disproportionately represented in the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases. However, this data is not complete, as the race of 39.8% of the state’s cases and 41.7% of the state’s deaths is unknown. In Chelsea, a city just outside of Boston that is 60% Hispanic/Latinx and nearly 50% immigrants, nearly a third of 200 blood samples were shown to have had exposure to coronavirus, in mid-April.

Michigan

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 10.0 million total population, 57,397 cases, 5,491 deaths
- White alone: 74.9% of state population, 37.0% of cases, 51.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 14.1% of state population, 31.0% of cases, 40.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 5.2% of state population, 7.0% of cases, 2.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.4% of state population, 2.0% of cases, 1.0% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.7% of state population, 0.5% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 16.0% of cases, 4.0% of deaths

Black and African American people are disproportionately likely to both get COVID-19 and to die from it. While they make up only 14.1% of the population, they represent 31% of cases and 40% of deaths. The toll on Black and African American residents is so heavy that Michigan has created a racial disparities task force.

[Pictured: A sign displays a positive message thanking first responders outside of a closed Majestic Theatre as the coronavirus pandemic continues on April 26 in Detroit.]

 

Minnesota

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 5.5 million total population, 24,850 cases, 1,050 deaths
- White alone: 79.5% of state population, 34.3% of cases, 61.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 6.8% of state population, 22.4% of cases, 6.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 5.5% of state population, 19.8% of cases, 2.4% of deaths
- Asian alone: 5.1% of state population, 5.6% of cases, 2.5% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.4% of state population, 0.8% of cases, 1.2% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.2% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Unknown: 22.9% of cases, 28.5% of deaths

Although Minnesota is 79.5% white, the population only makes up 34.3% of the state’s cases, while Black/African Americans make up 22.4% of cases and Hispanic/Latinx people make up 19.8%. Jan Malcolm, Minnesota’s Health Commissioner, said that this is due in part to the fact the people from racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to be exposed because they’re overrepresented in essential jobs such as food production and long-term nursing care.

Mississippi

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.0 million total population, 15,501 cases, 734 deaths
- White alone: 56.5% of state population, 28.3% of cases, 43.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 37.8% of state population, 54.0% of cases, 51.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 3.4% of state population, 5.7% of cases, 1.4% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.1% of state population, 0.4% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.6% of state population, 4.3% of cases, 3.8% of deaths
- Unknown: 4.0% of cases, 0.3% of deaths

In Mississippi, Black/African American people only make up 37.8% of the population, yet they account for 54% of cases and 51% of deaths. Southern states like Mississippi have been especially vulnerable due to a legacy of poverty and racism. In an interview with ABC news, chair of the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University, Evelynn Hammonds, said: “We live in a society that [is] stratified by race. It’s true that race is a part of the discussion we have to have in order to think about the best way to come to terms with this outbreak.”

Missouri

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.1 million total population, 13,147 cases, 772 deaths
- White alone: 79.3% of state population, 43.0% of cases, 57.4% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 11.8% of state population, 31.5% of cases, 35.2% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 4.3% of state population, 8.2% of cases, 2.1% of deaths
- Unknown: 17.2% of cases, 3.8% of deaths

Missouri’s African American/Black population makes up only 11.8% of the state’s total yet represent 31.5% of cases and 35.2% of deaths. In St. Louis as in much of the state, Black people have long had less access to health care, education, and jobs when compared with their white counterparts. In an interview with St. Louis Public Radio, St. Louis University School of Law professor Rob Gatter added about inequality’s effect on health: “It’s poverty, it’s underlying poor health. It’s living in a ZIP code that’s a bit of a desert when it comes to transportation to get to health care services or to get to good food, to get to a safe neighborhood where you could possibly exercise.”

Montana

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.0 million total population, 515 cases, 17 deaths
- White alone: 85.9% of state population, 85.6% of cases, 75.0% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 0.6% of state population, 0.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 4.0% of state population, 4.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 0.9% of state population, 0.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 6.6% of state population, 10.3% of cases, 25.0% of deaths
- Unknown: 2.7% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

The Native American and Alaska Native populations in Montana are suffering from COVID-19 at very disproportionate rates. While they make up only 6.6% of Montana’s population and have 10.3% of cases, they are a quarter of the state’s total deaths. Unfortunately, conditions on reservations make it easier for the coronavirus to spread, and Native Americans have higher rates of the kinds of pre-existing conditions that make COVID-19 deadlier, such as diabetes.

Nebraska

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.9 million total population, 13,905 cases, 170 deaths
- Unknown: 100.0% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

Nebraska is one of the states that does not report racial data when it comes to COVID-19. However, anecdotally the Hispanic/Latinx population is being impacted at disproportionately high rates. Meat processing plants in the state, which employ many Hispanic/Latinx workers, have become prime places for the illness to spread.

Nevada

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 2.9 million total population, 8,593 cases, 417 deaths
- White alone: 48.7% of state population, 23.6% of cases, 46.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 10.1% of state population, 7.9% of cases, 12.4% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 29.0% of state population, 27.3% of cases, 15.9% of deaths
- Asian alone: 8.7% of state population, 7.6% of cases, 14.7% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.7% of state population, 0.5% of cases, 0.7% of deaths
- Unknown: 33.0% of cases, 15.7% of deaths

In Nevada, although people who identify as Asian alone represent just 8.7% of the population and make up 7.6% of cases, they make up 14.7% of deaths. Although other minority groups do not show a disproportionate percentage of COVID-19 cases or deaths, race data has not been collected for 33% of the state’s cases and 15.7% of its deaths. In Clark County, where Las Vegas is located, 18.58% of the deaths were Black/African American residents (as of May 4) while making up just 12.21% of the county’s population.

New Hampshire

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.3 million total population, 4,545 cases, 242 deaths
- White alone: 90.0% of state population, 42.6% of cases, 35.9% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 1.7% of state population, 3.2% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 3.9% of state population, 5.0% of cases, 1.6% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.0% of state population, 1.7% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Unknown: 42.0% of cases, 58.4% of deaths

New Hampshire’s COVID-19 racial data is incomplete. The race of 42% of the state’s cases and 58.4% of deaths are unknown. Black/African American residents make up only 1.7% of the population, yet based on the data that does exist, constitutes 3.2% of the COVID-19 cases. April data from the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services showed that COVID-19 disproportionately impacts the Black/African American and Hispanic/Latinx communities.

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New Jersey

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 8.9 million total population, 160,445 cases, 11,698 deaths
- White alone: 54.9% of state population, 19.7% of cases, 51.4% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 15.0% of state population, 9.6% of cases, 17.8% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 20.6% of state population, 16.7% of cases, 18.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 10.0% of state population, 2.8% of cases, 5.3% of deaths
- Unknown: 44.6% of cases, 6.6% of deaths

In New Jersey, the racial data for COVID-19 deaths is nearly complete but the data for the number of cases is only just over half complete. While statewide, COVID-19 deaths are relatively proportional, cities like Newark that have large minority populations have been hit harder and are concerned that the state reopening will have an especially negative impact on minority communities.

[Pictured: New Jersey residents at Branch Brook Park in Newark on May 3.]

 

New Mexico

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 2.1 million total population, 7,624 cases, 351 deaths
- White alone: 37.1% of state population, 11.8% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 2.6% of state population, 2.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 49.1% of state population, 24.0% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 1.8% of state population, 0.6% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 10.9% of state population, 57.7% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 3.4% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

New Mexico’s numbers for COVID-19 deaths are not broken down by race. However, looking just at the number of cases, it is very apparent how much the Native American/Alaska Native population is suffering. While they make up just 10.9% of New Mexico’s population, they account for 57.7% of the state’s cases. The Navajo in New Mexico make up much of these numbers, though the Zia Pueblo and San Felipe communities have actually been harder hit per capita as of mid-May.

New York

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 19.6 million total population, 370,770 cases, 23,905 deaths
- White alone: 55.4% of state population, cases data not available, 32.4% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 17.6% of state population, cases data not available, 23.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 19.2% of state population, cases data not available, 24.9% of deaths
- Asian alone: 9.0% of state population, cases data not available, 6.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 100.0% of cases, 4.9% of deaths

New York does not have a breakdown by race. However, the state’s death count does include racial data, which shows that both Black/African American and Hispanic/Latinx groups are disproportionately represented. Antibody testing shows that in New York City, low-income, minority communities have been hit the hardest.

North Carolina

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 10.2 million total population, 28,589 cases, 886 deaths
- White alone: 62.8% of state population, 39.8% of cases, 56.2% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 22.2% of state population, 21.9% of cases, 32.5% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 9.6% of state population, 26.5% of cases, 5.4% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.2% of state population, 2.1% of cases, 1.2% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.6% of state population, 0.7% of cases, 0.5% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.3% of cases, 0.2% of deaths
- Unknown: 26.2% of cases, 5.2% of deaths

In North Carolina, the Black/African American community has been hit especially hard by COVID-19. They make up 22.2% of the state’s population and 21.9% of its cases, but a disproportionate 32.5% of its deaths. As the state has entered Phase 2 of reopening—which means stores and restaurants at limited capacity—minorities, who tend to work disproportionately in service jobs, could face higher risk.

[Pictured: Signage informing the public that the NASCAR Xfinity Series Alsco 300 at Charlotte Motor Speedway will be closed to fans and guests due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on May 25 in Concord.]

 

North Dakota

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 752,201 total population, 2,577 cases, 61 deaths
- Unknown: 100.0% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

So far, North Dakota has not reported any COVID-19 data that includes race. However, according to May 2020 data from the North Dakota Department of Health, African American/Black residents constitute a quarter of all North Dakotans who have tested positive for COVID-19 even though they only make up 2.7% of the state’s total population.

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Ohio

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 11.6 million total population, 35,513 cases, 2,155 deaths
- White alone: 78.7% of state population, 50.9% of cases, 78.7% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 13.0% of state population, 24.9% of cases, 17.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 3.9% of state population, 7.2% of cases, 1.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 2.5% of state population, 2.6% of cases, 0.9% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.3% of state population, 0.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.1% of state population, 0.3% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 10.1% of cases, 1.6% of deaths

In Ohio, Black/African American and Latinx/Hispanic residents account for disproportionate numbers of COVID-19 cases. Gov. Mike DeWine is taking steps to address this discrepancy. A new position has been created at the Ohio Department of Health: Deputy Director of Social Determinants of Health and Opportunity. In addition, the state will work with the Ohio Association of Community Health Centers to expand testing to minority communities and distribute Community Wellness Kits, which include face masks and hand sanitizer.

Oklahoma

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.9 million total population, 6,506 cases, 334 deaths
- White alone: 65.3% of state population, 64.7% of cases, 76.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 7.8% of state population, 9.5% of cases, 8.1% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 10.9% of state population, 19.2% of cases, 3.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 2.3% of state population, 2.6% of cases, 0.6% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 9.3% of state population, 6.2% of cases, 6.6% of deaths
- Unknown: 12.9% of cases, 6.0% of deaths

Oklahoma’s Hispanic/Latinx population makes up 19.2% of the state’s COVID-19 cases even though they are only 10.9% of the total population. Some of this discrepancy is caused by the meat processing plants, which employ many Hispanic/Latinx immigrants and require them to work in close quarters. The Seaboard Foods plant in the town of Guymon has had 641 of its 2,700 workers test positive.

Oregon

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 4.1 million total population, 4,243 cases, 153 deaths
- White alone: 75.3% of state population, 45.9% of cases, 71.2% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 2.2% of state population, 2.3% of cases, 3.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 13.3% of state population, 31.0% of cases, 9.2% of deaths
- Asian alone: 4.8% of state population, 3.3% of cases, 4.6% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.8% of state population, 1.6% of cases, 2.0% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.5% of state population, 1.2% of cases, 0.7% of deaths
- Unknown: 16.5% of cases, 9.8% of deaths

In Oregon, the Hispanic/Latinx community is heavily overrepresented in its rates of COVID-19 cases. While they make up 13.3% of the population, they account for 31% of cases. To respond to this, in April, Oregon expanded its testing criteria to prioritize the Latinx community along with that of other minorities.

Pennsylvania

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 12.8 million total population, 72,546 cases, 5,555 deaths
- White alone: 76.1% of state population, 27.6% of cases, 71.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 12.0% of state population, 12.2% of cases, 20.1% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 7.6% of state population, 7.0% of cases, 5.5% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.7% of state population, 1.4% of cases, 2.4% of deaths
- Unknown: 58.2% of cases, 1.6% of deaths

In Pennsylvania, Black/African Americans make up 12% of the state’s population but 20.1% of deaths. The discrepancy is especially stark in Philadelphia, where African Americans make up 54% of the city’s deaths as of May 2. In an article for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Eve J. Higginbotham, the vice dean for diversity and inclusion at the Perelman School of Medicine, suggested some measures to lessen the impact on minority communities, such as facilitating better access to testing and implementing culturally appropriate messaging about getting tested.

Rhode Island

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.1 million total population, 14,928 cases, 718 deaths
- White alone: 72.0% of state population, 36.0% of cases, 82.1% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 8.4% of state population, 13.0% of cases, 6.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 15.9% of state population, 45.0% of cases, 10.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 0.0% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

Rhode Island’s Hispanic/Latinx population is suffering from a disproportionate rate of COVID-19 cases, making up 15.9% of the state’s population yet 45% of its cases. Central Falls, which has a large Latinx community, is being hit especially hard; as of May 13, it had the highest rate of infections with more than 2,400 cases per 100,000 people.

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South Carolina

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 5.0 million total population, 11,861 cases, 494 deaths
- White alone: 63.7% of state population, 35.8% of cases, 47.4% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 27.1% of state population, 37.5% of cases, 39.7% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 5.8% of state population, 9.4% of cases, 1.8% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.8% of state population, 1.7% of cases, 0.8% of deaths
- Unknown: 20.8% of cases, 10.7% of deaths

In South Carolina, Black/African American residents make up 37.5% of COVID-19 cases, 39.7% of deaths, and yet only 27.1% of the population. In order to properly document the experience of this group, an initiative from the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission is collecting letters, art, music, and other documents and stories about the experiences of African Americans in South Carolina during this pandemic.

South Dakota

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 864,289 total population, 4,993 cases, 62 deaths
- White alone: 81.4% of state population, 30.8% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 2.4% of state population, 18.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 4.1% of state population, 17.6% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 1.7% of state population, 11.6% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 9.0% of state population, 9.9% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 0.0% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

While South Dakota has not shared racial data for its COVID-19 deaths, it does have those data for 100% of cases. These data show that Black/African Americans are suffering 18.1% of cases despite being only 2.4% of the population, and that Hispanic/Latinx residents are experiencing 17.6% of the cases even though they are only 4.1% of the population. The Hispanic/Latinx community has been hit especially hard because they are overrepresented working at meatpacking plants.

[Pictured: A sign asks travelers not to stop in the community in Lower Brule.]

Tennessee

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 6.7 million total population, 23,006 cases, 364 deaths
- White alone: 73.7% of state population, 43.2% of cases, 55.8% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 17.1% of state population, 22.6% of cases, 34.9% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 5.6% of state population, 21.4% of cases, 6.3% of deaths
- Asian alone: 1.9% of state population, 1.8% of cases, 1.9% of deaths
- Unknown: 20.3% of cases, 2.5% of deaths

Tennessee’s African American/Black population is suffering and dying from COVID-19 at disproportionate rates. There is currently a program in the state that allows the sharing of personal information of people with COVID-19 with law enforcement, However, the Black Caucus wrote a letter to Gov. Bill Lee saying that it is “adamantly opposed” to “unnecessarily violating the individual privacy rights” of residents.

Texas

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 27.9 million total population, 64,287 cases, 1,672 deaths
- White alone: 41.5% of state population, 6.4% of cases, 10.9% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 12.8% of state population, 3.7% of cases, 4.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 39.6% of state population, 9.2% of cases, 7.3% of deaths
- Asian alone: 5.2% of state population, 0.8% of cases, 0.4% of deaths
- Unknown: 79.8% of cases, 77.3% of deaths

Currently, Texas’ data on the racial breakdown is extremely incomplete, with 79.8% of COVID-19 cases unknown and 77.3% of deaths unknown. In the city of Lubbock, minorities have been infected and died in disproportionate numbers. Of the city’s 575 confirmed cases as of May 6, 242 people, 42%, identify as Hispanic.

Utah

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 3.0 million total population, 9,797 cases, 113 deaths
- White alone: 78.0% of state population, 37.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 1.4% of state population, 3.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 14.2% of state population, 39.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 2.7% of state population, 2.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.5% of state population, 3.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 1.0% of state population, 3.9% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 9.8% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

In Utah, Native American/Alaska Native residents account for a disproportionate number of COVID-19 cases. In order to get ahead of the situation among the state’s Navajo residents, a collaborative mobile testing unit has been created between the Utah Department of Health’s Public Health Laboratory and the Utah Navajo Health System. It allows anyone, even people without symptoms or from other states.

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Vermont

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 624,977 total population, 981 cases, 55 deaths
- White alone: 92.5% of state population, 91.0% of cases, 92.7% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 1.4% of state population, 3.5% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 2.0% of state population, 2.8% of cases, 0.0% of deaths
- Asian alone: 2.0% of state population, 1.1% of cases, 3.6% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 0.4% of state population, 0.1% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 3.1% of cases, 0.0% of deaths

Vermont’s population is 92.5% white and the state has a very small African American/Black population (1.4%); however, African Americans make up 3.5% of the state’s cases. These data have prompted Gov. Phil Scott to create a task force for supporting the state’s people of color.

Virginia

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 8.4 million total population, 44,607 cases, 1,375 deaths
- White alone: 61.5% of state population, 30.8% of cases, 54.6% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 19.9% of state population, 14.0% of cases, 20.5% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 9.6% of state population, 31.6% of cases, 9.1% of deaths
- Unknown: 32.9% of cases, 12.9% of deaths

Hispanic/Latinx people account for 31.6% of Virginia’s COVID-19 cases in spite of being just 9.6% of the population. In Richmond, the state’s capital, 64% of cases are either Hispanic or Black as of May 23. Because these minorities tend to perform a disproportionate amount of essential, non-socially distanced work, there is concern that as Virginia begins to reopen, these populations will be even harder hit.

Washington

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 7.3 million total population, 21,349 cases, 1,118 deaths
- White alone: 68.0% of state population, 27.5% of cases, 64.5% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 4.3% of state population, 4.7% of cases, 3.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 12.9% of state population, 27.6% of cases, 8.1% of deaths
- Asian alone: 9.3% of state population, 5.3% of cases, 8.6% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.9% of state population, 1.0% of cases, 0.8% of deaths
- Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 0.8% of state population, 1.7% of cases, 0.8% of deaths
- Unknown: 29.6% of cases, 11.0% of deaths

In Washington, the Latinx/Hispanic population has been especially impacted by COVID-19. Although the community makes up 12.9% of the population, they are suffering 27.6% of Washington’s cases. This recent uptick in cases is due in large part to prior lack of testing along with exposure at work.

West Virginia

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 1.8 million total population, 2,010 cases, 75 deaths
- White alone: 92.1% of state population, 80.4% of cases, 77.3% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 3.6% of state population, 7.1% of cases, 4.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 1.7% of state population, cases data not available, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 0.0% of cases, 18.7% of deaths

In West Virginia, Black/African American residents are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19, though the state does not have data for the Hispanic/Latinx population. In order to properly track the COVID-19 status of its minority population, West Virginia has rolled out additional testing for minorities.

Wisconsin

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 5.8 million total population, 18,403 cases, 592 deaths
- White alone: 81.1% of state population, 52.0% of cases, 67.2% of deaths
- Black or African American alone: 6.7% of state population, 19.2% of cases, 25.0% of deaths
- Hispanic or Latino: 6.9% of state population, 33.5% of cases, 9.3% of deaths
- Asian alone: 3.0% of state population, 3.7% of cases, 2.7% of deaths
- Native American or Alaska Native: 1.2% of state population, 1.1% of cases, 1.5% of deaths
- Unknown: 11.4% of cases, 2.4% of deaths

Wisconsin’s Black/African American and Hispanic/Latinx communities are suffering especially starkly from the impacts of COVID-19 and the former are also dying at a very high rate from COVID-19. Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s largest city, was found in a December 2018 Brookings report to be the most segregated metropolitan area in the country.

Wyoming

State COVID-19 statistics as of May 31: 581,836 total population, 903 cases, 16 deaths
- White alone: 83.8% of state population, 46.5% of cases, deaths data not available
- Black or African American alone: 1.3% of state population, 1.2% of cases, deaths data not available
- Hispanic or Latino: 10.1% of state population, 11.4% of cases, deaths data not available
- Asian alone: 1.1% of state population, 0.6% of cases, deaths data not available
- Native American or Alaska Native: 2.7% of state population, 33.8% of cases, deaths data not available
- Unknown: 8.0% of cases, 100.0% of deaths

In Wyoming, the Native American/Alaska Native population makes up just 2.7% of the population yet a hugely disproportionate 33.8% of COVID-19 cases. The Native American population is also suffering exorbitantly due to years-long lack of access to medical care and barriers to economic mobility that has come with colonization, along with discrimination and poverty.

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