States with the most super commuters

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August 20, 2020
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States with the most super commuters

There are nearly 280 million vehicles on the road in the United States, and many of those cars, trucks, vans, and motorcycles are used to ferry people to and from their homes and jobs during their daily commutes. A small but growing number of people are walking and biking to work, particularly in compact college towns. Many more take public transportation, especially in major cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington D.C., Boston, and Seattle—but nationwide, public transit accounts for only about 5% of daily commutes.

The overwhelming majority of people still drive to and from work every day, and the vast majority of those car commuters drive alone—fewer than 10% of Americans carpool. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average one-way commute in the United States has grown to a record 27.1 minutes. That’s just shy of an hour a day that average Americans squander behind the wheel, not at home with their families, and instead, burning gas and putting miles on their cars.

For some Americans, however, the commute to work is far from average. A phenomenon known as super commuting has emerged and grown in recent years. Super commuters spend 90 minutes or more—each way—chasing their paychecks every day. The biggest percentage of super commuters work in the extraction industry, with workers pursuing lucrative jobs in remote mines, oil fields, and other energy operations. Many more, however, have been priced out of expensive housing in urban metro areas where high-paying jobs are located, far away from their less-expensive county of residence.

Stacker compiled a list of the states with the highest percentage of super commuters using 2018 five-year estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. States are ranked by the percentage of workers with a 90-plus-minute travel time to work. We also highlighted the three counties with the highest percentage of super commuters in each state. Then, we used a variety of sources—including state government data, news reports, government studies, third-party studies, and reports from traffic and highway authorities—to profile the overall commuting situation in each state.

Keep reading to learn about how Americans get to work.

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#50. Nebraska

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.104%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Loup County (5.5%)
--- #2. Pawnee County (4.4%)
--- #3. Logan County (4.1%)

More than nine in 10 Nebraskans either drive to work or ride in a carpool—only 13 states have a higher share of car-based commuters. The vast majority of Nebraska’s car commuters—drive themselves, and few carpool.

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#49. Kansas

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.174%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Elk County (6.8%)
--- #2. Trego County (6.5%)
--- #3. Linn County (5.0%)

More people commute into Kansas for work than commute out of it. Those who drive or ride into the state tend to work in retail, warehousing, manufacturing, transportation, and utilities. Those leaving the state to get to their jobs tend to earn more money and work in industries like management, professional and scientific work, and administrative and waste management services.

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#48. South Dakota

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.179%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Custer County (4.0%)
--- #2. Harding County (3.8%)
--- #3. Bennett County (3.1%)

Like those in so many other sparsely-populated states, commuters in South Dakota rely mostly on their cars, trucks, and vans to get to work, and most drive alone. In 2018, only about 1,100 workers commuted via public transportation—more residents bike, work at home, and even walk to work there.

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#47. Iowa

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.319%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Wayne County (5.3%)
--- #2. Decatur County (5.3%)
--- #3. Monroe County (4.8%)

The average commuter in Iowa zips to work in less than 20 minutes. It’s a car, truck, and van state, for sure, but in places like Ames and Iowa City, a higher percentage of commuters walk to work than in even the most foot-friendly cities like New York and Honolulu.

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#46. Utah

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.444%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Sanpete County (5.8%)
--- #2. San Juan County (5.3%)
--- #3. Piute County (4.4%)

The share of Utah commuters who have to travel beyond the county where they live has grown steadily over the last two decades. Even so, the average commute in Utah is just short of 20 minutes one way. Only 11 states have a faster average ride or drive to and from work.

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#45. Wisconsin

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.609%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Burnett County (6.8%)
--- #2. Marquette County (5.1%)
--- #3. Pepin County (4.0%)

People who live in and around Milwaukee enjoy a shorter commute than their counterparts in all but four major cities in the United States. Local commuters squander just over half as much time getting to and from work as their cohorts in New York City.

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#44. Ohio

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.617%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Adams County (9.6%)
--- #2. Vinton County (7.1%)
--- #3. Monroe County (5.9%)

Generally speaking, commuting times are shortest in the northwest of Ohio and the northern Lake Erie region. Things are worst in the south-central part of the state near Columbus, and the southwestern portion near Cincinnati.

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#43. Minnesota

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.645%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Pine County (7.7%)
--- #2. Kanabec County (7.0%)
--- #3. Clearwater County (4.7%)

Most employers in Minnesota are concentrated in just a few counties, so out-of-county travel is not unusual there. A dozen counties, in fact, have high out-of-county commuter percentages and, naturally, longer-than-average commute times. In five of those counties, well over half of the people who live there commute out of their counties of residence for work.

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#42. Arkansas

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.653%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Searcy County (9.0%)
--- #2. Cleburne County (5.9%)
--- #3. Polk County (5.3%)

About 1 million of Arkansas’ 1.2 million wage earners commute by car, truck, or van, and  140,000 carpool, according to 2018 statistics. Non-drivers are by far most likely to work from home, followed by much-smaller percentages who walk, take public transportation, or get to work by some other means.

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#41. Montana

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.675%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Park County (7.6%)
--- #2. Musselshell County (6.0%)
--- #3. Sweet Grass County (4.4%)

According to a 2017 Pew report, only a few states have witnessed a reduction in super commuters in recent years—Montana experienced the biggest decrease of them all. That has mostly to do with changes in the regional energy industry. Fewer and fewer Montanans are commuting to oil and fracking fields in neighboring North Dakota.

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#40. Oklahoma

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.723%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Okfuskee County (6.7%)
--- #2. Coal County (5.6%)
--- #3. Dewey County (5.1%)

Oklahomans enjoy a low average commute time of 21.2 minutes, according to 2018 data. More than four workers in five at that time drove to work alone and fewer than one in 10 carpool. Those together represent the vast majority of commuters in the state.

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#39. Idaho

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.738%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Boise County (8.2%)
--- #2. Camas County (8.0%)
--- #3. Bear Lake County (7.4%)

Idahoans are a little more likely to carpool and a little less likely to drive to work alone than commuters in many other sparsely-populated states. Also, commuters got a reason to celebrate when officials approved a major expansion of the heavily-traveled Interstate 84 highway.

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#38. Missouri

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.740%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. St. Clair County (9.1%)
--- #2. Worth County (8.6%)
--- #3. Washington County (7.4%)

Average commuters in Missouri’s top urban centers enjoy a fairly stress-free ride. In both Kansas City and St. Louis—the #1 and #2 biggest cities in the state, respectively—commute times are among the shortest of all the large cities in the country.

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#37. Vermont

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.748%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Orleans County (4.5%)
--- #2. Essex County (4.0%)
--- #3. Grand Isle County (3.7%)

In general, residents of Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom face the longest average daily work commutes in the state. That region is home to both Orleans and Essex counties, where the largest concentrations of the state’s super commuters live. The other big super commuter hotspot, Grand Isle County, also happens to host the highest concentration of carpoolers.

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#36. Tennessee

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.778%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Macon County (6.0%)
--- #2. Stewart County (5.4%)
--- #3. Hickman County (5.3%)

Tennessee has created the Smart Commute program, which was designed to reduce congestion and pollution and save Tennesseans money on their rides to and from work. It includes resources in all the major commuter areas—Nashville, Knoxville, Memphis, and Chattanooga—as well as alternatives to driving throughout the state.

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#35. North Dakota

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.805%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Renville County (8.0%)
--- #2. Slope County (7.7%)
--- #3. McHenry County (4.9%)

More than 80% of North Dakotans drive alone to work, and less than 10% carpool, with even fewer using public transportation—only 1%. The average commute time of just over 17 minutes is the second-shortest in America, beat only by neighboring South Dakota.

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#34. Indiana

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.825%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Switzerland County (9.4%)
--- #2. Newton County (5.1%)
--- #3. Owen County (5.0%)

People who live in the northwest region of Indiana suffer some of the longest commutes in the entire state. That’s because thousands travel to and from Chicago for work.

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#33. South Carolina

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.835%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Barnwell County (5.6%)
--- #2. Marion County (5.6%)
--- #3. Hampton County (5.1%)

South Carolina is solidly in the middle when it comes to commute times, compared to other states. Almost 30% commute outside their county, or even their state.

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#32. Michigan

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.851%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Lapeer County (5.6%)
--- #2. Lake County (5.5%)
--- #3. Sanilac County (5.3%)

Michiganders have average commute times that are lower than the national average—but commutes there have been getting longer and longer. More than 80% drive alone, and less than 10% carpool, while those who walk, bike or ride transit comprise only a few percentage points of the total.

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#31. Alabama

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.859%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Greene County (8.3%)
--- #2. Cleburne County (7.5%)
--- #3. Winston County (5.9%)

Of the major metro areas in Alabama, people who live in Birmingham-Hoover have the longest commutes in the state: A one-way ride lasts almost half an hour. Huntsville offers the shortest commute, and Mobile and Montgomery fall in between.

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#30. New Mexico

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.866%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Mora County (12.8%)
--- #2. Hidalgo County (5.8%)
--- #3. Torrance County (5.4%)

Compared to the national average, New Mexico commuters are more likely to drive or ride in a private vehicle than to take public transportation. In recent years, fewer people have carpooled while more people have used an alternative form of transportation, like walking.

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#29. Arizona

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.878%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Apache County (5.5%)
--- #2. Gila County (4.7%)
--- #3. Yavapai County (3.7%)

Arizona’s highways have become congested, and some argue for the need for more investments in infrastructure and transit as population numbers climb. Phoenix, however, stands out as one of the country’s best major metro areas in terms of the average time spent getting to and from work.

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#28. Alaska

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.918%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Matanuska-Susitna Borough (5.8%)
--- #2. Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area (3.3%)
--- #3. Kenai Peninsula Borough (3.2%)

Geographically, Alaska is the largest state in America, and much of it is remote, wild, and frozen. Even so, workers there enjoy a surprisingly-short commutes for drivers. That’s surprising, considering that the extraction industry drives super commuting and Alaska is an energy state. But those who travel by transit face some of the longest commutes in the country for that transportation mode. 

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#27. Kentucky

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.921%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Elliott County (13.4%)
--- #2. Lee County (12.5%)
--- #3. Magoffin County (10.0%)

Commuting times in Kentucky are lower than the national average, and residents of Louisville are helping by taking even more cars off the state’s roads and highways. The city is developing the Louisville Loop, a 100-mile trail system designed to connect neighborhoods throughout the city.

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#26. Oregon

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.928%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Crook County (4.1%)
--- #2. Clatsop County (3.5%)
--- #3. Lake County (3.5%)

Not many Oregonians are super commuters, but one in five head to other counties, and many cross state lines as part of their commutes. The average commute in the state is faster than the national average.

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#25. North Carolina

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 1.937%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Perquimans County (8.7%)
--- #2. Tyrrell County (7.7%)
--- #3. Hyde County (6.6%)

Commuters in cities like Wilmington and Greensboro spend less time getting to work than most North Carolinians, while Winston-Salem, Raleigh, and Durham spend more time getting from Point A to Point B. The worst commute of all is in booming Charlotte.

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#24. Colorado

https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/mile-high-mornings/central-70-project-denver/73-a9b97c3a-592e-457d-8c6a-7e5f77082812#:~:text=Sellers%20said%20the%20Central%2070,worker%20safety%20in%20the%20project.- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.007%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Jackson County (9.0%)
--- #2. Custer County (7.6%)
--- #3. Garfield County (6.8%)

Denver’s population grew by 20% between 2010-2019 alone, and it’s not the only part of the state that's booming. Eight of Colorado’s 10 biggest counties witnessed double-digit population growth in less than a decade. All those new people mean lots of extra cars, and their presence commands lots of new construction—like the massive Central 70 highway project.

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#23. Nevada

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.080%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Elko County (11.1%)
--- #2. Humboldt County (9.0%)
--- #3. Eureka County (5.2%)

Elko County’s huge population of super commuters gives it the rank of the country’s #11 county for super commuting out of more than 3,000 counties. Part of the reason might be regional occupational trends. Extraction occupations represent the largest population of super commuters by far, and more than one in 10 Elko workers are employed in the extraction industry—very similar to its percentage of super commuters.

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#22. Maine

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.184%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Piscataquis County (4.9%)
--- #2. Somerset County (3.3%)
--- #3. Franklin County (3.2%)

The percentages in the three biggest super commuter counties in Maine aren’t particularly high compared to many other hotspots in this half of the list. Oddly enough, only three of Maine’s 16 counties have mean commute times that are higher than the national average.

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#21. Texas

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.276%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Terrell County (14.2%)
--- #2. Jim Hogg County (12.5%)
--- #3. Newton County (12.5%)

As previously stated, the extraction industry pays the dollars that the biggest chunk of super commuters chase, and Texas is an oil state. In Terrell County, one of the biggest super commuter counties on this list, the percentage of super commuters grew by 350%—from six to 27—between 2009 and 2017 alone, even as the total workforce dropped by 21.5% from 298 to 234 during the same time.

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#20. Florida

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.277%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Glades County (10.3%)
--- #2. Hendry County (6.4%)
--- #3. Dixie County (4.8%)

Florida’s super commuters are concentrated in the south of the state. The high-paying jobs are concentrated on the coast in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach—but those metros are largely unaffordable to the masses. The state’s leading supercommuter counties—neighboring Glades and Hendry counties—are a little more than 90 minutes away from that cluster of wealth and jobs.

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#19. Wyoming

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.287%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Converse County (8.4%)
--- #2. Niobrara County (7.6%)
--- #3. Crook County (6.0%)

Wyoming is America’s least-populous state. More than one in 10 workers commute beyond their county of residence and more than 6% travel to work in another state, but on average, the trip to work is shorter than the national average.

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#18. Delaware

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.547%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Sussex County (2.9%)
--- #2. Kent County (2.7%)
--- #3. New Castle County (2.4%)

Delaware came in dead last in a 2018 Esurance study that ranked states from best to worst for commuters. The second-smallest state, behind only Rhode Island, tiny Delaware’s highways are stressed under the pressure of visitors traveling to its sprawling beaches, along with the crush of commuters who travel to Pennsylvania and back every day for work. It’s also in the heart of the Interstate 95 chokepoint that links Philadelphia and New York to the north with Baltimore and Washington D.C. to the mid-Atlantic south.

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#17. Rhode Island

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.589%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Providence County (2.9%)
--- #2. Bristol County (2.5%)
--- #3. Washington County (2.3%)

A 2020 WalletHub study ranked Rhode Island as one of the worst states for drivers in all of America. The study considered the following factors: cost of ownership and maintenance, traffic and infrastructure, safety, and access to vehicles and maintenance.

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#16. Mississippi

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.665%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Amite County (14.5%)
--- #2. Wayne County (11.2%)
--- #3. Walthall County (10.6%)

The mean commute time in Mississippi is lower than the national average. Between 2009 and 2017, the percentage of super commuters grew by 32.8% in Amite County, the state’s #1 super commuter hotspot. In #2 Wayne County, it grew by 30.8% during the same time period, and in #3 Walthall County, it grew by a whopping 47.1%.

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#15. Hawaii

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.709%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Hawaii County (3.1%)
--- #2. Honolulu County (3.0%)
--- #3. Maui County (1.3%)

WalletHub ranked Hawaii dead last in their study of worst states for drivers . It landed at the very bottom for maintenance costs, gas prices, and fewest repair shops per capita. Not to mention that the number of super commuters increased by 81.5% from 2009 to 2019.

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#14. Pennsylvania

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.918%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Pike County (17.7%)
--- #2. Monroe County (13.6%)
--- #3. Huntingdon County (5.5%)

The average commute time in Pennsylvania is just short of the national average. In the Eastern portion of the large, populous state lies Philadelphia, which draws masses of commuters not just from the city’s sprawling metro area in Pennsylvania, but from throughout Delaware and South Jersey, as well. To the west is Pittsburgh, which brings commuters from across the vast Pennsylvania interior, as well as from neighboring Ohio and West Virginia.

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#13. Illinois

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 2.961%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Calhoun County (8.0%)
--- #2. Hamilton County (5.7%)
--- #3. Alexander County (5.3%)

Many in Illinois have a fairly benign commute, but in and around Chicago’s Cook County, that is rarely the case. According to a study cited by the Milwaukee BizTimes, Chicagoans have the second-longest commute, behind only New York City. Commuters there spend more than an hour a day getting to work and back.

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#12. Georgia

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.031%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Haralson County (9.1%)
--- #2. Heard County (9.1%)
--- #3. Union County (7.3%)

From South Carolina and Tennessee to Florida and Alabama, all major highways going through Georgia converge in Atlanta, where commuting is a notorious grind. A 2019 study showed that the average commute by both public transportation and car takes 35 minutes.

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#11. Louisiana

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.034%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. LaSalle Parish (15.2%)
--- #2. Sabine Parish (9.5%)
--- #3. Red River Parish (8.8%)

According to Business Insider, the place with the longest average commute in Louisiana is not New Orleans, Baton Rouge, or Shreveport, but Bunkie. Commuters in the tiny central-state town of less than 5,000 spend close to 40 minutes getting to and from work.

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#10. Washington

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.053%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Kitsap County (7.1%)
--- #2. Island County (6.5%)
--- #3. Pierce County (5.3%)

Washington State is a national hub of technology and industry—and its leaders used that status to leverage big businesses headquartered there to dramatically reduce single-driver commutes. Its Commute Trip Reduction program successfully targeted worksites with more than 100 employees with laws, regulations, assistance, and suggestions designed to get cars off the road.

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#9. Virginia

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.139%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Rappahannock County (17.4%)
--- #2. Culpeper County (12.5%)
--- #3. Warren County (12.1%)

The D.C. metro area of Virginia has not only some of the longest and most-grueling commutes in America, but also some of the most expensive. According to a Bloomberg study, four of the country’s seven most expensive counties for commuters are in Virginia. All but one of the top eight most-expensive counties are in the D.C. metro region in general.

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#8. Connecticut

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.335%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Fairfield County (6.6%)
--- #2. Litchfield County (3.2%)
--- #3. New Haven County (2.9%)

For generations, Connecticut residents have endured expensive and grinding commutes into New York City for high-paying jobs—but maybe not for long. The state’s governor noted in 2020s that CEOs of major companies have advised him that they plan to leverage telecommuting over physical office space to save money. Pandemic shutdowns only sped up that process.

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#7. Massachusetts

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.336%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Plymouth County (5.9%)
--- #2. Essex County (4.4%)
--- #3. Norfolk County (4.1%)

In 2019, Boston.com reported on the more than 10,000 people, mostly from western Massachusetts, who travel each day “across the state ... to tap into Boston’s thriving job market.” The state’s super commuter phenomenon can be traced to the disparity in the state’s east/west economic and rural/urban divide. In western Massachusetts, populations skew older, incomes skew lower, and opportunities are fewer. The good jobs are on the coast, but the cost of living is too high for many to settle there.

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#6. New Hampshire

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.454%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Rockingham County (4.0%)
--- #2. Carroll County (3.8%)
--- #3. Hillsborough County (3.8%)

Many New Hampshire commuters are caught in the orbit of Boston’s booming job market. In fact, about more than 80,000 people commute from New Hampshire to Massachusetts for work every day. Virtually all of them drive instead of taking public transportation.

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#5. West Virginia

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.531%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Clay County (12.8%)
--- #2. Calhoun County (10.6%)
--- #3. Hampshire County (9.7%)

West Virginia is dominated by two different commuting dynamics. On one hand, many workers commute every day to their jobs in Washington D.C. and Maryland—a good chunk of those take the Maryland-based MARC train. Many others, however, travel long distances to get to the remaining jobs in the state’s once-great coal industry.

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#4. California

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 3.969%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. San Joaquin County (9.6%)
--- #2. San Benito County (9.4%)
--- #3. Calaveras County (8.5%)

California is one of America’s most-prolific super commuting states, and not just because of the grinding traffic that people tend to associate with places like Los Angeles. There is simply not enough housing—and certainly not enough affordable housing—for people to live where they work, particularly in the booming and impossibly unaffordable Bay Area. For many there, hours-long daily commutes are the norm—and are projected to become the norm for more commuters in the near future.

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#3. Maryland

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 4.478%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Charles County (12.2%)
--- #2. Calvert County (8.9%)
--- #3. Queen Anne's County (8.3%)

For many in Maryland, dreadful commutes are a way of life. Baltimore is located smack dab in the middle of I-95’s most-constricted chokepoint, with commuters from all directions clawing and scratching to get to and from not only Baltimore, but also to Washington D.C. in the south and Philadelphia in the north—with expensive tolls scattered throughout.

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#2. New Jersey

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 5.224%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Monmouth County (8.9%)
--- #2. Sussex County (7.5%)
--- #3. Middlesex County (7.4%)

The same 2020 WalletHub study that pilloried Rhode Island also ranked New Jersey in the top 10 of worst states for drivers. New Jersey is the most densely-populated state in America, anchored by New York City to the North and Philadelphia to the South, both of which support sprawling commuter suburbs that are linked by the section of Interstate 95 known as the New Jersey Turnpike. On the East Coast, commuters grapple with the Garden State Parkway.

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#1. New York

- Workers with 90+ minute commute: 5.690%
- Counties with most 90+ minute commuters:
--- #1. Richmond County (14.7%)
--- #2. Putnam County (9.4%)
--- #3. Bronx County (9.3%)

New York is, of course, a large state with different geographical regions—but the commuting capital of the country is without question New York City. Just 5% of American commuters take public transportation, but in New York City, more than 30% do—the largest percentage by far in the entire country—thanks to the city’s massive and efficient network of subways, trains, and ferries. Every day, commuters from the city’s outer boroughs, as well as from New Jersey, Long Island, and Connecticut, double Manhattan’s population for the day, all on an island that measures 13.4 miles long by 2.3 miles wide at its widest point.

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