Voter demographics of every state

Written by:
October 26, 2021
JOSEPH PREZIOSO // Getty Images

Voter demographics of every state

In 2020, 158.4 million citizens—almost two-thirds of estimated eligible voters—voted in the presidential elections, according to the Pew Research Center. The number represented a higher than average turnout, with people voting in numbers not seen since 1980 and possibly well before. 

Stacker compiled voter demographics for each state and Washington, D.C., using the 2019 U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (released in September 2020). Each slide shows the state’s voting-eligible population (citizens who are 18 or older) and the breakdown of that population by sex, age, race, and education. Economic statistics are not included because the American Community Survey does not account for COVID-19, which affected unemployment, poverty, and medical insurance status for millions of Americans. In order to avoid making any assumptions about the data or the participants of the American Community Survey, Stacker used the exact wording of the “race” and “sex” framework that was provided in the census data.

By percentage, voters aged 45–64 are the highest in every state, with registered voters over the age of 45 comprising more than half the country’s population. Older voters also trend toward turning out to vote at a higher rate and played a significant role in former President Donald Trump’s 2016 victory in Florida.

Along racial lines, Black or African American voters in Louisiana and Georgia comprise more than 30% of the state’s registered voters. California and Texas—which award the most electoral votes at 55 and 38, respectively—boast the highest numbers of Latino voters. On the other end of the spectrum, West Virginia and Maine boast the highest percentage of white voters. A number of states had already seen record voter turnouts, with 16 seeing more than half of its registered voters casting a ballot before Election Day.

Continue reading for a glimpse into the voter demographics of every state.

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Alabama

- Voting-eligible population: 3,731,336
- Breakdown by sex: 47.4% male, 52.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.5% 18-29 years old, 23.5% 30-44 years old, 33.3% 45-64 years old, 22.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 69.9% White, 26.7% Black or African American, 0.9% Asian, 2.2% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.3% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.1% less than high school education, 9.2% some high school (no diploma), 31.6% high school graduate or equivalency, 23.5% some college (no degree), 8.6% associate's degree, 15.2% bachelor's degree, 8.9% graduate or professional degree

Based on the 2018 gubernatorial race in Alabama, counties with a higher number of minorities favored the Democratic ticket, while voters 40 and older preferred the GOP ballot. Education level reportedly has nothing to do with how Alabamians voted in the election two years ago.

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Alaska

- Voting-eligible population: 533,151
- Breakdown by sex: 52.2% male, 47.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 23.2% 18-29 years old, 27.0% 30-44 years old, 33.1% 45-64 years old, 16.7% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 68.6% White, 3.3% Black or African American, 5.0% Asian, 6.0% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 1.2% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 5.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.7% less than high school education, 5.3% some high school (no diploma), 30.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 27.4% some college (no degree), 8.4% associate's degree, 16.8% bachelor's degree, 10.3% graduate or professional degree

Along with Alaska’s former governor, Sarah Palin, current Vice President of the United States Kamala Harris was one of only three women ever nominated for the role. (In January 2021, Harris became the first female vice president of the United States.) Palin was chosen alongside candidate John McCain, while Geraldine Ferraro teamed with Walter Mondale in 1984. In the last two presidential elections, Alaskan voters preferred the Republican candidate over the Democrat contender by less than 15%.

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Arizona

- Voting-eligible population: 5,137,474
- Breakdown by sex: 49.3% male, 50.7% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.8% 18-29 years old, 23.1% 30-44 years old, 30.6% 45-64 years old, 24.5% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 81.1% White, 4.7% Black or African American, 2.5% Asian, 24.0% Hispanic or Latino, 4.6% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.2% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.0% less than high school education, 7.1% some high school (no diploma), 25.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 27.4% some college (no degree), 8.7% associate's degree, 18.3% bachelor's degree, 10.3% graduate or professional degree

The highest percentage of voters in Arizona are white, between the ages of 45-64 years old, and almost equally divided by each gender. As a whole, Arizona has participated in 27 presidential elections since 1912, and in that time, the Grand Canyon State selected the winning presidential candidate 77.78% of the time.

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Arkansas

- Voting-eligible population: 2,235,415
- Breakdown by sex: 48.1% male, 51.9% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.7% 18-29 years old, 23.6% 30-44 years old, 32.4% 45-64 years old, 23.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 79.7% White, 15.5% Black or African American, 1.1% Asian, 3.9% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.4% less than high school education, 7.9% some high school (no diploma), 35.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 24.5% some college (no degree), 7.4% associate's degree, 14.5% bachelor's degree, 7.3% graduate or professional degree

Arkansas voters are standing in line for longer than ever before to cast their ballot, with some counties seeing record turnouts, compared to the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections. Pulaski, the state’s most massive county populace of more than 391,000 with over 250,000 registered voters, tripled the number of absentee ballot requests for the 2020 election compared to 2016.

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California

- Voting-eligible population: 26,032,160
- Breakdown by sex: 49.1% male, 50.9% female
- Breakdown by age: 22.9% 18-29 years old, 25.0% 30-44 years old, 31.4% 45-64 years old, 20.7% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 63.4% White, 6.7% Black or African American, 14.3% Asian, 30.9% Hispanic or Latino, 0.9% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.4% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 4.1% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 4.6% less than high school education, 6.3% some high school (no diploma), 21.9% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.1% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 21.8% bachelor's degree, 12.1% graduate or professional degree

Famous for being blue and giving its U.S.-leading 50+ electoral votes to every Democratic presidential nominee since 1992, the Golden State has 20.9 million registered voters. The percentage of registered voters increased by 10% since 2016 in California, which has one of the lowest rates of prominent white voters, while male and female balloter proportions are nearly equal, on average.

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Colorado

- Voting-eligible population: 4,244,210
- Breakdown by sex: 50.2% male, 49.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.9% 18-29 years old, 26.8% 30-44 years old, 31.7% 45-64 years old, 19.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 86.7% White, 4.0% Black or African American, 2.6% Asian, 16.5% Hispanic or Latino, 1.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 3.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.0% less than high school education, 4.7% some high school (no diploma), 22.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.9% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 25.7% bachelor's degree, 14.5% graduate or professional degree

When it comes to voters who have a graduate or professional degree, Colorado locals averaged a higher percentage than many other states in 2020. Colorado is one of the healthiest states to live in—and 19.6% of voters in the state are above the age of 65.

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Connecticut

- Voting-eligible population: 2,619,474
- Breakdown by sex: 47.9% male, 52.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.8% 18-29 years old, 21.3% 30-44 years old, 35.6% 45-64 years old, 23.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 79.6% White, 10.5% Black or African American, 3.3% Asian, 12.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.7% less than high school education, 5.5% some high school (no diploma), 27.4% high school graduate or equivalency, 19.7% some college (no degree), 7.5% associate's degree, 21.6% bachelor's degree, 15.8% graduate or professional degree

Almost 16% of Connecticut voters have a graduate or professional degree, behind only Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Massachusetts for the highest percentage in the country. The Constitution State has more than 2.6 million eligible voters—more women than men by 4.2%—earning it seven electoral votes.

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Delaware

- Voting-eligible population: 725,178
- Breakdown by sex: 47.5% male, 52.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.1% 18-29 years old, 21.2% 30-44 years old, 34.0% 45-64 years old, 25.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 72.4% White, 21.7% Black or African American, 2.5% Asian, 5.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.0% less than high school education, 6.4% some high school (no diploma), 31.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.1% some college (no degree), 7.9% associate's degree, 18.5% bachelor's degree, 12.2% graduate or professional degree

Breaking down voting demographics by sex shows that women in Delaware surpass men by 5%, revealing the female voter’s influence in the state, as seen in the League of Women Voters’ present Vote411.org campaign. However, although considered a moderately liberal government, Delaware voters essentially voted equally for both political parties in all presidential elections since 1900.

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Florida

- Voting-eligible population: 15,507,315
- Breakdown by sex: 48.1% male, 51.9% female
- Breakdown by age: 18.3% 18-29 years old, 21.6% 30-44 years old, 32.5% 45-64 years old, 27.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 77.8% White, 15.0% Black or African American, 2.3% Asian, 20.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.2% less than high school education, 7.2% some high school (no diploma), 28.7% high school graduate or equivalency, 21.7% some college (no degree), 10.3% associate's degree, 18.5% bachelor's degree, 10.5% graduate or professional degree

Florida’s breakdown of voter demographics by race reveals the Sunshine State’s diversity compared to other U.S. regions with its high Latino population of 20.8%. The racial vote is imperative to all elections, presidential or other, with 2020’s records showing Latinos comprise 17% of all Florida voters, making their ballots essential for a win.

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Georgia

- Voting-eligible population: 7,581,837
- Breakdown by sex: 47.4% male, 52.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 22.1% 18-29 years old, 24.7% 30-44 years old, 33.5% 45-64 years old, 19.7% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 60.9% White, 32.9% Black or African American, 2.9% Asian, 5.0% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.7% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.8% less than high school education, 8.1% some high school (no diploma), 28.7% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.9% some college (no degree), 7.7% associate's degree, 18.8% bachelor's degree, 11.0% graduate or professional degree

Like Florida’s high Latino voting population, Georgia’s high percentage of Black or African American voters reveal a strong racial influence compared to other U.S. regions. African American voters control a large percentage of the state’s overall tally, which was critical to the 2020 election since Georgia already reportedly saw its most massive poll turnout in a state notorious for voter suppression. With 5.2% more female voters than males, African American women were reportedly a force to reckon with in that election.

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Hawaii

- Voting-eligible population: 1,014,035
- Breakdown by sex: 50.5% male, 49.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.7% 18-29 years old, 24.4% 30-44 years old, 31.0% 45-64 years old, 24.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 27.5% White, 2.1% Black or African American, 40.0% Asian, 8.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 9.2% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 19.1% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.6% less than high school education, 3.8% some high school (no diploma), 29.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.6% some college (no degree), 10.2% associate's degree, 21.0% bachelor's degree, 10.8% graduate or professional degree

With the lowest percentage of white voters in the U.S., Hawaii’s Asian American population makes up the largest percentage of voters, followed by Hispanic groups and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islanders. With its four electoral votes, Hawaii’s population features almost 20% of voters who are of two or more races; however, the Asian American majority is reportedly the fastest-growing racial contingent in the U.S. electorate.

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Idaho

- Voting-eligible population: 1,282,630
- Breakdown by sex: 49.6% male, 50.4% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.2% 18-29 years old, 24.9% 30-44 years old, 31.6% 45-64 years old, 22.2% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 91.9% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 8.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.3% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.8% less than high school education, 5.9% some high school (no diploma), 27.5% high school graduate or equivalency, 27.9% some college (no degree), 10.3% associate's degree, 17.8% bachelor's degree, 8.8% graduate or professional degree

Predominantly made up of a white voter population, the Gem State has voted GOP 70% of the time since 1900. The rather red state reported a record turnout in the 2020 primary with up to 38% voting, a number unseen since the 1980 election at a little less than 31%. The 2016 Electorate’s Idaho Profile revealed a tied voting population between balloters ages 18–44 and voters between 45–65.

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Illinois

- Voting-eligible population: 9,088,036
- Breakdown by sex: 48.3% male, 51.7% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.9% 18-29 years old, 24.2% 30-44 years old, 33.3% 45-64 years old, 21.7% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 75.0% White, 14.7% Black or African American, 4.4% Asian, 12.2% Hispanic or Latino, 0.2% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.8% less than high school education, 5.9% some high school (no diploma), 26.3% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.9% some college (no degree), 8.3% associate's degree, 21.2% bachelor's degree, 12.5% graduate or professional degree

With one of the higher voting-eligible populations, Illinois citizens account for 20 electoral votes, making the Land of Lincoln extremely influential in any presidential election. State voters have chosen the winning commander in chief 83.33% of the time since they first cast ballots in 1900.

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Indiana

- Voting-eligible population: 4,978,356
- Breakdown by sex: 48.4% male, 51.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.4% 18-29 years old, 23.6% 30-44 years old, 33.4% 45-64 years old, 21.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 86.2% White, 9.0% Black or African American, 1.4% Asian, 4.5% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.7% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.8% less than high school education, 7.3% some high school (no diploma), 34.6% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.3% some college (no degree), 8.3% associate's degree, 16.3% bachelor's degree, 8.3% graduate or professional degree

The Hoosier State’s voting demographics undeniably skew toward white balloters, but its citizens collectively have an equal average undergraduate and graduate degree percentage. The collective political voting history of Indiana, with 11 electoral votes, leans toward the GOP ticket, excepting the 2008 presidential election, when Barack Obama won the state by 0.09% over John McCain.

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Iowa

- Voting-eligible population: 2,348,787
- Breakdown by sex: 49.1% male, 50.9% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.9% 18-29 years old, 23.4% 30-44 years old, 32.3% 45-64 years old, 23.4% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 92.9% White, 3.2% Black or African American, 1.5% Asian, 3.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.0% less than high school education, 4.9% some high school (no diploma), 31.0% high school graduate or equivalency, 23.7% some college (no degree), 11.5% associate's degree, 18.8% bachelor's degree, 8.2% graduate or professional degree

Since the election of Democrat Jimmy Carter in 1976, “Iowa has remained a crucial proving ground for nearly every presidential candidate,” according to Brynn Holland in a History.com article. Though awarding only six electoral votes, the Hawkeye State has significant influence during election season, fluctuating from a swing state to a region of “pivot counties,” or areas that voted for Barack Obama twice followed by Donald Trump in 2016.

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Kansas

- Voting-eligible population: 2,103,748
- Breakdown by sex: 49.2% male, 50.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.9% 18-29 years old, 23.9% 30-44 years old, 31.9% 45-64 years old, 22.4% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 87.0% White, 5.7% Black or African American, 2.2% Asian, 7.4% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.7% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.0% less than high school education, 5.2% some high school (no diploma), 27.0% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.3% some college (no degree), 9.2% associate's degree, 20.5% bachelor's degree, 10.8% graduate or professional degree

The voting-eligible population in Kansas continues to decline, reducing the Sunflower State to six electoral votes from 10 in the early 2000s. The state’s record of voting for the winning president since 1900 is a little above average at 70%, making the ballots of predominantly white voters ages 45–64 influential in the 2020 general election.

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Kentucky

- Voting-eligible population: 3,367,502
- Breakdown by sex: 48.5% male, 51.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.6% 18-29 years old, 23.3% 30-44 years old, 33.8% 45-64 years old, 22.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 89.2% White, 7.8% Black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 1.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 4.2% less than high school education, 8.1% some high school (no diploma), 33.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.5% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 14.1% bachelor's degree, 9.0% graduate or professional degree

The Bluegrass State prefers red, voting Republican more often than not in the past five presidential elections. However, Democrats reportedly demanded more absentee ballots for the 2020 general election. As with other U.S. regions breaking voter turnout records, Kentucky adds to the list, with the collective percentage of all voter demographics already showing a 70% turnout, numbers not seen since 1992, which had a turnout of 73.2%.

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Louisiana

- Voting-eligible population: 3,463,372
- Breakdown by sex: 47.8% male, 52.2% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.0% 18-29 years old, 25.4% 30-44 years old, 32.4% 45-64 years old, 21.2% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 64.0% White, 31.9% Black or African American, 1.2% Asian, 3.1% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.7% less than high school education, 10.1% some high school (no diploma), 34.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 23.0% some college (no degree), 6.0% associate's degree, 15.2% bachelor's degree, 7.9% graduate or professional degree

The percentage of Black or African American voters is much higher in Louisiana, 31.9%, compared to the rest of the country. The collective voting population of the Bayou State—which includes age, sex, race, and education—has voted solely for the GOP since the 2000 general election.

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Maine

- Voting-eligible population: 1,078,770
- Breakdown by sex: 48.4% male, 51.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 17.1% 18-29 years old, 21.2% 30-44 years old, 35.5% 45-64 years old, 26.2% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 95.6% White, 0.9% Black or African American, 0.9% Asian, 1.4% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.6% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.9% less than high school education, 5.2% some high school (no diploma), 31.9% high school graduate or equivalency, 20.4% some college (no degree), 9.5% associate's degree, 19.8% bachelor's degree, 11.2% graduate or professional degree

The breakdown of Maine’s degree attainment of each racial population ages 25–64 is highest for whites at 40.77%, while the African American number is 27.7%, the Hispanic 37.45%, the Asian/Pacific Islander 47.86%, and the Native American 25.17%. Based on Maine’s percentages, white female voters with college degrees are a significant demographic for the Pine Tree State.

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Maryland

- Voting-eligible population: 4,316,921
- Breakdown by sex: 47.5% male, 52.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.8% 18-29 years old, 23.9% 30-44 years old, 34.9% 45-64 years old, 21.4% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 59.1% White, 30.9% Black or African American, 5.1% Asian, 5.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.2% less than high school education, 5.7% some high school (no diploma), 25.6% high school graduate or equivalency, 20.9% some college (no degree), 6.8% associate's degree, 21.5% bachelor's degree, 17.3% graduate or professional degree

Maryland residents are highly educated, with up to 38.8% holding either a bachelor’s, graduate, or professional degree. The Pew Research Center breaks down Maryland voting trends among populations including sex, race, and religious group based on party affiliation. Both Democrat and GOP voters in Maryland share almost equally the percentage of those with Catholic, Protestant, and Mainline Protestant beliefs.

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Massachusetts

- Voting-eligible population: 5,057,192
- Breakdown by sex: 47.6% male, 52.4% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.0% 18-29 years old, 22.6% 30-44 years old, 34.0% 45-64 years old, 22.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 82.6% White, 6.9% Black or African American, 4.8% Asian, 9.2% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.9% less than high school education, 4.6% some high school (no diploma), 24.4% high school graduate or equivalency, 18.7% some college (no degree), 7.2% associate's degree, 24.4% bachelor's degree, 17.7% graduate or professional degree

With its relatively high percentage of voters with graduate or professional degrees, Massachusetts is the most educated state in the U.S. Predominant voter populations in the Bay State comprise white females ages 45–64 years old. According to census data, more Massachusetts women voted in the 2018 midterm elections, with 50.6% casting a ballot.

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Michigan

- Voting-eligible population: 7,562,464
- Breakdown by sex: 48.6% male, 51.4% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.7% 18-29 years old, 22.1% 30-44 years old, 34.1% 45-64 years old, 23.0% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 81.1% White, 13.5% Black or African American, 2.1% Asian, 3.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.6% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.1% less than high school education, 6.5% some high school (no diploma), 29.9% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.1% some college (no degree), 9.1% associate's degree, 17.2% bachelor's degree, 10.1% graduate or professional degree

Like many other states, Michigan residents, regardless of sex, age, race, and education do not brand themselves by a political party when they register to vote. In 2020, up to 75% of Michigan residents were white, nearly 15% more than the national average of 60.4%. In the 2016 presidential election, Great Lake State residents turned out to vote at 64.3%, compared to the U.S. average of 61.4%.

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Minnesota

- Voting-eligible population: 4,157,556
- Breakdown by sex: 49.2% male, 50.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.9% 18-29 years old, 24.8% 30-44 years old, 33.4% 45-64 years old, 22.0% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 87.1% White, 4.9% Black or African American, 3.7% Asian, 3.3% Hispanic or Latino, 1.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.1% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.9% less than high school education, 4.3% some high school (no diploma), 25.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.6% some college (no degree), 11.3% associate's degree, 23.6% bachelor's degree, 11.2% graduate or professional degree

A notable battleground state with predominantly white voters, the 2020 African American population of 6.6% in Minnesota was nearly half the national average of 12.5%. Additionally, the Hispanic population was underrepresented in Minnesota at 5.5%, compared to the U.S. average of 18.3%.

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Mississippi

- Voting-eligible population: 2,246,323
- Breakdown by sex: 47.5% male, 52.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.4% 18-29 years old, 24.2% 30-44 years old, 32.8% 45-64 years old, 21.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 60.3% White, 37.1% Black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 1.9% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.9% less than high school education, 10.5% some high school (no diploma), 30.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.0% some college (no degree), 10.2% associate's degree, 12.7% bachelor's degree, 7.5% graduate or professional degree

Mississippi represents one of the closest gaps between its white and Black or African American voters. While still at a 23.2% difference, it is much lower than in predominantly white states like Maine, where the gap stretches to 94.7%. There are reportedly more than 1 million African Americans who reside in Mississippi, contributing to the high voting populace.

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Missouri

- Voting-eligible population: 4,650,318
- Breakdown by sex: 48.4% male, 51.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.4% 18-29 years old, 24.0% 30-44 years old, 33.1% 45-64 years old, 22.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 84.6% White, 10.9% Black or African American, 1.4% Asian, 2.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.4% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.5% less than high school education, 6.8% some high school (no diploma), 31.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 23.5% some college (no degree), 7.7% associate's degree, 17.5% bachelor's degree, 10.2% graduate or professional degree

Missouri voters only missed one election in a 100-year streak of choosing the winning president, in 1956. The collective voting demographics, which changed considerably over the century, revealed in the 2018 midterm election that professionally educated voters and higher minority balloters preferred the Democratic ticket, while voters ages 45 years and older favored the GOP.

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Montana

- Voting-eligible population: 831,760
- Breakdown by sex: 49.9% male, 50.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.8% 18-29 years old, 23.3% 30-44 years old, 32.0% 45-64 years old, 24.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 90.3% White, 0.6% Asian, 3.2% Hispanic or Latino, data not available for other races
- Breakdown by education: 1.6% less than high school education, 5.0% some high school (no diploma), 29.4% high school graduate or equivalency, 24.5% some college (no degree), 8.8% associate's degree, 21.4% bachelor's degree, 9.2% graduate or professional degree

Montana doesn’t require residents to provide their race when registering to vote, which is why there is no data on the amount of Native American, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, or multiracial voters. However, the Indigenous group makes up 6.7% of the state’s almost 1 million populace. Regardless of the lack of data, Native American voters can play a major role in swinging the Big Sky Country State.

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Nebraska

- Voting-eligible population: 1,388,950
- Breakdown by sex: 49.2% male, 50.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.5% 18-29 years old, 24.5% 30-44 years old, 31.7% 45-64 years old, 22.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 89.8% White, 4.1% Black or African American, 1.6% Asian, 6.7% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.1% less than high school education, 4.4% some high school (no diploma), 26.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.1% some college (no degree), 10.9% associate's degree, 21.2% bachelor's degree, 10.1% graduate or professional degree

Nebraska’s collective voting turnout, including sex, age, race, and education, was 63% in the 2016 general election, higher than the national average. While the North Central region of Nebraska saw the most massive turnout, of all Cornhusker State Counties, Arthur and Loup saw the highest, while Thurston and Wayne had the lowest. Like every state, Nebraska’s voting turnout rises with age, with 65-and-older voters hitting the polls at 76% for the 2016 general election.

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Nevada

- Voting-eligible population: 2,111,932
- Breakdown by sex: 50.0% male, 50.0% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.4% 18-29 years old, 24.8% 30-44 years old, 32.3% 45-64 years old, 22.4% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 69.7% White, 9.9% Black or African American, 7.9% Asian, 20.3% Hispanic or Latino, 1.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.7% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 3.7% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.7% less than high school education, 7.3% some high school (no diploma), 29.5% high school graduate or equivalency, 26.9% some college (no degree), 9.0% associate's degree, 16.2% bachelor's degree, 8.5% graduate or professional degree

Made up of a more diverse voting population than other U.S. regions, Nevada’s increased African American, Asian, and Latino populations make minority groups an influential factor in election results. That influence will only increase, as the Battle Born State’s populace rose by 14.1% between 2010–19.

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New Hampshire

- Voting-eligible population: 1,070,215
- Breakdown by sex: 49.1% male, 50.9% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.0% 18-29 years old, 21.5% 30-44 years old, 36.2% 45-64 years old, 23.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 94.9% White, 1.2% Black or African American, 1.6% Asian, 2.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.5% less than high school education, 5.4% some high school (no diploma), 28.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 20.3% some college (no degree), 9.6% associate's degree, 21.6% bachelor's degree, 12.8% graduate or professional degree

Voter demographics in New Hampshire—which has one of the highest percentages of white voters—seem to be changing, specifically toward a younger generation of voters. New Hampshire’s developing voting dynamics are reportedly a mirror for the rest of the country, with reports that by 2045, the U.S. will be a nation of “minority white voters.”

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New Jersey

- Voting-eligible population: 6,170,130
- Breakdown by sex: 48.0% male, 52.0% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.1% 18-29 years old, 22.3% 30-44 years old, 35.7% 45-64 years old, 22.9% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 72.2% White, 13.9% Black or African American, 7.5% Asian, 15.5% Hispanic or Latino, 0.2% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.9% less than high school education, 5.0% some high school (no diploma), 27.0% high school graduate or equivalency, 19.1% some college (no degree), 6.7% associate's degree, 25.0% bachelor's degree, 14.3% graduate or professional degree

Similar to neighboring New York, New Jersey has a high group of minority voters, with Black or African American, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, and Pacific Islanders comprising 36.9% of the vote. The Garden State reared the first Black voter in 1870 when Metuchen native Thomas Mundy Peterson cast his ballot in Perth Amboy after the 1870 reconstruction of the 15th Amendment.

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New Mexico

- Voting-eligible population: 1,522,171
- Breakdown by sex: 48.9% male, 51.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.0% 18-29 years old, 23.7% 30-44 years old, 31.1% 45-64 years old, 24.2% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 75.8% White, 2.3% Black or African American, 1.3% Asian, 43.6% Hispanic or Latino, 9.6% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.8% less than high school education, 8.4% some high school (no diploma), 27.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 24.9% some college (no degree), 9.1% associate's degree, 15.0% bachelor's degree, 11.0% graduate or professional degree

New Mexico has the highest number of Hispanic or Latino voters in the country. This is demographically significant since Hispanic and Latino voters prefer the Democratic ticket, which only lost the state once in the last seven presidential elections. That trend is poised to continue, with October 2020 showing that Joe Biden led by double digits in the Land of Enchantment.

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New York

- Voting-eligible population: 13,810,830
- Breakdown by sex: 47.7% male, 52.3% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.0% 18-29 years old, 23.3% 30-44 years old, 33.0% 45-64 years old, 22.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 68.5% White, 15.6% Black or African American, 6.7% Asian, 15.2% Hispanic or Latino, 0.4% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.8% less than high school education, 6.4% some high school (no diploma), 25.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 18.5% some college (no degree), 8.9% associate's degree, 21.3% bachelor's degree, 15.2% graduate or professional degree

Tied with Florida for the third-most electoral votes at 29, New York has voted Democratic in every presidential election since 1988. One-third of the state’s registered voters reside in New York City, with a record 4.6 million on the voter rolls as of 2017. The Empire State is one of the most ethnically diverse in the nation, and nearly 31% of registered voters are Black or Latino.

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North Carolina

- Voting-eligible population: 7,729,644
- Breakdown by sex: 47.6% male, 52.4% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.0% 18-29 years old, 23.1% 30-44 years old, 33.6% 45-64 years old, 22.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 71.6% White, 21.9% Black or African American, 2.0% Asian, 4.7% Hispanic or Latino, 1.2% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.5% less than high school education, 7.4% some high school (no diploma), 26.6% high school graduate or equivalency, 23.7% some college (no degree), 10.0% associate's degree, 19.4% bachelor's degree, 10.4% graduate or professional degree

With 15 electoral votes based on its almost 10.5 million populace, North Carolina’s collective voting population continues to grow. The state populace rose by 10% between 2009–2019, much higher than the national average of 6.3%. The highest percentage of voters by age are residents age 65 or older, which make up 16.4% of the overall state population, slightly higher than the national average of 16.1%.

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North Dakota

- Voting-eligible population: 567,545
- Breakdown by sex: 51.0% male, 49.0% female
- Breakdown by age: 24.5% 18-29 years old, 25.0% 30-44 years old, 29.4% 45-64 years old, 21.1% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 89.5% White, 2.0% Black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 3.2% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.1% less than high school education, 4.4% some high school (no diploma), 26.7% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.2% some college (no degree), 13.7% associate's degree, 20.4% bachelor's degree, 7.5% graduate or professional degree

North Dakota has one of the lowest voting-eligible populations in the U.S. However, the low number does not reflect the collective voter turnout of all communities, including age, sex, race, and education, as up to 64.2% of voting-eligible residents cast ballots in the 2016 general election, compared to the national average turnout of 61.4%.

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Ohio

- Voting-eligible population: 8,879,469
- Breakdown by sex: 48.3% male, 51.7% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.1% 18-29 years old, 23.1% 30-44 years old, 33.9% 45-64 years old, 22.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 83.9% White, 11.9% Black or African American, 1.5% Asian, 2.7% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.3% less than high school education, 7.0% some high school (no diploma), 33.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.4% some college (no degree), 8.3% associate's degree, 17.1% bachelor's degree, 9.6% graduate or professional degree

Ohio’s overall voting populace is one of the seven highest in the U.S., with 18 electoral votes. Considered a notable battleground state due to its increased number of electoral votes, based on population changes, moderate politics, and ideological polarization, the Buckeye State’s collective voting population consistently swings from one political party to the other.

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Oklahoma

- Voting-eligible population: 2,875,059
- Breakdown by sex: 48.8% male, 51.2% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.8% 18-29 years old, 24.8% 30-44 years old, 31.7% 45-64 years old, 21.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 75.7% White, 7.2% Black or African American, 1.8% Asian, 6.3% Hispanic or Latino, 7.8% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 6.1% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.5% less than high school education, 8.0% some high school (no diploma), 32.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.1% some college (no degree), 7.9% associate's degree, 16.3% bachelor's degree, 8.0% graduate or professional degree

The Sooner State’s 65+ voter demographic makes up 15.8% of Oklahoma’s overall population. Residents ages 45–64 have the highest number of voters, consistent with the rest of the U.S. In the 2016 general election, 56.6% of eligible voters cast their ballot, slightly under the national average of 61.4%.

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Oregon

- Voting-eligible population: 3,162,204
- Breakdown by sex: 48.9% male, 51.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.7% 18-29 years old, 25.2% 30-44 years old, 31.3% 45-64 years old, 23.9% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 87.2% White, 1.8% Black or African American, 3.6% Asian, 8.5% Hispanic or Latino, 1.2% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.3% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 3.9% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.9% less than high school education, 5.6% some high school (no diploma), 24.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 27.1% some college (no degree), 9.0% associate's degree, 20.2% bachelor's degree, 12.1% graduate or professional degree

Oregon’s minority population is much smaller than other U.S. regions. The Beaver State’s largest city, Portland, which is noted as the “Whitest City in America,” is notorious for minority exclusion, as further revealed in Oregon’s low minority voter populations, including Asian and Hispanic groups.

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Pennsylvania

- Voting-eligible population: 9,810,201
- Breakdown by sex: 48.4% male, 51.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 19.5% 18-29 years old, 22.6% 30-44 years old, 33.8% 45-64 years old, 24.1% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 83.3% White, 10.6% Black or African American, 2.4% Asian, 5.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.2% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.6% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.5% less than high school education, 6.3% some high school (no diploma), 34.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 18.1% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 18.7% bachelor's degree, 11.3% graduate or professional degree

With 20 electoral votes, Pennsylvania has been and remains one of the most influential states in any election. The Keystone State’s 12.8 million populace makes up 4% of the total U.S. population, further showing the state’s powerful electoral position. Though adjacent to states with higher minority voting groups, including New York and New Jersey, Pennsylvania’s 2020 Black or African American population of 10.8% was not equal to the U.S. average of 12.5%.

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Rhode Island

- Voting-eligible population: 800,798
- Breakdown by sex: 47.7% male, 52.3% female
- Breakdown by age: 21.3% 18-29 years old, 21.9% 30-44 years old, 34.1% 45-64 years old, 22.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 84.0% White, 6.2% Black or African American, 2.6% Asian, 11.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.8% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.4% less than high school education, 6.0% some high school (no diploma), 29.0% high school graduate or equivalency, 21.0% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 19.9% bachelor's degree, 12.5% graduate or professional degree

With only four electoral votes, Rhode Island’s percentage of picking the successful presidential candidate since 1900 is 73.33%. Like so many other U.S. regions, Rhode Island is seeing record-level numbers regarding early voting, according to the Boston Globe, adding up to 55,000 residents casting their ballots in October 2020.

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South Carolina

- Voting-eligible population: 3,892,341
- Breakdown by sex: 47.5% male, 52.5% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.0% 18-29 years old, 22.9% 30-44 years old, 33.2% 45-64 years old, 23.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 69.7% White, 26.5% Black or African American, 1.2% Asian, 2.9% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.8% less than high school education, 8.2% some high school (no diploma), 29.4% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.8% some college (no degree), 9.3% associate's degree, 17.4% bachelor's degree, 10.0% graduate or professional degree

South Carolina’s Black or African American voting populace is high, making the minority vote in the Palmetto State influential. While voters ages 45–64 hold the highest percentage in age demographics, The state’s voting-eligible population is growing substantially, with new residents rising 11.3% from 2009–2019, compared to the U.S. average of 6.3%.

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South Dakota

- Voting-eligible population: 653,394
- Breakdown by sex: 50.2% male, 49.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.6% 18-29 years old, 24.0% 30-44 years old, 32.0% 45-64 years old, 23.5% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 88.1% White, 1.5% Black or African American, 0.9% Asian, 2.3% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.2% less than high school education, 5.7% some high school (no diploma), 30.8% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.7% some college (no degree), 11.3% associate's degree, 19.2% bachelor's degree, 8.1% graduate or professional degree

With only three electoral votes, South Dakota has a high percentage of white voters and a low rate of minority voters. Though South Dakota has a collective voting demographic of 27.3% holding either bachelor’s, graduate, or professional degrees, the 2018 midterm election showed no distinct correlation between education level and voting preference.

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Tennessee

- Voting-eligible population: 5,129,580
- Breakdown by sex: 47.9% male, 52.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.8% 18-29 years old, 23.7% 30-44 years old, 33.6% 45-64 years old, 22.0% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 79.8% White, 16.6% Black or African American, 1.3% Asian, 2.5% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.3% less than high school education, 7.7% some high school (no diploma), 32.2% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.8% some college (no degree), 7.4% associate's degree, 17.2% bachelor's degree, 9.5% graduate or professional degree

Tennessee’s minority voters and educated balloters both favored the Democratic ticket in the midterm election two years ago, but that did not make a difference in the overall win for Republican contenders. The Volunteer State is one of several U.S. regions seeing record-breaking early voter turnouts, with Williamson County casting 122,000 ballots in October 2020.

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Texas

- Voting-eligible population: 18,875,542
- Breakdown by sex: 48.9% male, 51.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 23.5% 18-29 years old, 26.3% 30-44 years old, 31.6% 45-64 years old, 18.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 75.6% White, 13.4% Black or African American, 3.9% Asian, 30.9% Hispanic or Latino, 0.6% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.2% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.9% less than high school education, 7.2% some high school (no diploma), 26.9% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.1% some college (no degree), 7.8% associate's degree, 19.5% bachelor's degree, 9.6% graduate or professional degree

With 38 electoral votes, Texas is second only to California. The Lone Star State joins others in significant early voter turnout, with a record number of residents casting their ballots before November 3, 2020. “About 735,000 more people voted early this year in Texas than voted in the entire 2016 presidential election, including on Election Day,” according to Austin American-Statesman’s Madlin Mekelburg and Nicole Cobler.

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Utah

- Voting-eligible population: 2,134,249
- Breakdown by sex: 49.9% male, 50.1% female
- Breakdown by age: 27.1% 18-29 years old, 28.7% 30-44 years old, 27.4% 45-64 years old, 16.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 90.8% White, 0.9% Black or African American, 1.9% Asian, 9.6% Hispanic or Latino, 1.1% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.9% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.3% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.5% less than high school education, 5.0% some high school (no diploma), 24.4% high school graduate or equivalency, 28.6% some college (no degree), 9.6% associate's degree, 21.1% bachelor's degree, 9.7% graduate or professional degree

The lack of Black or African American residents and voters in Utah is slowly changing, while the Hispanic or Latino group is growing much more rapidly. Though there was no clear distinction in voting preference based on age in the 2018 midterm elections, minority and educated Utah voters preferred the Democratic ticket.

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Vermont

- Voting-eligible population: 498,705
- Breakdown by sex: 49.0% male, 51.0% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.4% 18-29 years old, 20.7% 30-44 years old, 34.1% 45-64 years old, 24.9% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 95.6% White, 1.0% Black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 1.6% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.0% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.7% less than high school education, 4.9% some high school (no diploma), 29.7% high school graduate or equivalency, 20.2% some college (no degree), 8.2% associate's degree, 21.3% bachelor's degree, 14.0% graduate or professional degree

With a low voting-eligible population, the Green Mountain State holds just three electoral votes. Based on the highest percentage, white female voters between the ages of 45–64 who have a bachelor’s degree are the most influential balloters in Vermont. Along with several other U.S. states, Vermont is breaking voting records, turning in more absentee ballots than ever before.

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Virginia

- Voting-eligible population: 6,226,623
- Breakdown by sex: 48.7% male, 51.3% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.9% 18-29 years old, 24.3% 30-44 years old, 33.5% 45-64 years old, 21.3% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 70.6% White, 19.9% Black or African American, 5.2% Asian, 5.7% Hispanic or Latino, 0.3% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.6% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.4% less than high school education, 6.1% some high school (no diploma), 25.1% high school graduate or equivalency, 21.8% some college (no degree), 7.9% degree, 21.3% bachelor's degree, 15.3% graduate or professional degree

Along with other East Coast states, Virginia has a high percentage of Black or African American voters. With up to 13 electoral votes, the Mother of States has had a less successful record of picking presidents compared to other states, only choosing the right candidate 66.7% of the time since 1900.

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Washington

- Voting-eligible population: 5,409,035
- Breakdown by sex: 49.6% male, 50.4% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.7% 18-29 years old, 25.4% 30-44 years old, 32.3% 45-64 years old, 21.7% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 80.5% White, 3.6% Black or African American, 6.9% Asian, 7.8% Hispanic or Latino, 1.4% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.5% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 4.5% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.9% less than high school education, 5.2% some high school (no diploma), 23.6% high school graduate or equivalency, 24.9% some college (no degree), 10.3% associate's degree, 21.9% bachelor's degree, 12.2% graduate or professional degree

A large voting-eligible population and 12 electoral votes give Washington a strong influence in any presidential election. Since the Evergreen State joined the Union in 1889, the collective voter demographics, including sex, age, race, and education, cast their votes almost equally between both political parties, with the exception of the last eight elections. Washington’s cumulative picks since 1900 earned the state a 73.3% record for choosing the eventual commander in chief.

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Washington, D.C.

- Voting-eligible population: 536,768
- Breakdown by sex: 46.4% male, 53.6% female
- Breakdown by age: 27.1% 18-29 years old, 32.4% 30-44 years old, 25.0% 45-64 years old, 15.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 45.6% White, 45.3% Black or African American, 3.9% Asian, 7.7% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 2.7% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 2.3% less than high school education, 4.6% some high school (no diploma), 17.5% high school graduate or equivalency, 17.2% some college (no degree), 3.1% associate's degree, 25.9% bachelor's degree, 29.5% graduate or professional degree

The most diverse and educated voting population in the U.S., the District of Columbia sets itself apart from other regions. With three electoral votes, it’s the only voting region with equal ethnic voting percentages between its white and the Black or African American population. Washington, D.C., began to vote in 1961 after the non-state became enfranchised to vote for a president under the 23rd Amendment.

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West Virginia

- Voting-eligible population: 1,420,289
- Breakdown by sex: 49.0% male, 51.0% female
- Breakdown by age: 18.3% 18-29 years old, 22.1% 30-44 years old, 33.8% 45-64 years old, 25.8% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 94.2% White, 3.7% Black or African American, 0.6% Asian, 1.0% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.1% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 3.9% less than high school education, 8.9% some high school (no diploma), 40.3% high school graduate or equivalency, 19.8% some college (no degree), 7.5% associate's degree, 12.3% bachelor's degree, 7.5% graduate or professional degree

Despite an overwhelmingly white and less-educated voting population than other states, West Virginia has one thing in common with other regions: It’s shattering early voting records. Unlike other states that have gained electoral votes due to a growing populace, the Mountain State has declined through the years and is projected to lose more of its voting pool by 2030.

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Wisconsin

- Voting-eligible population: 4,412,888
- Breakdown by sex: 49.2% male, 50.8% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.0% 18-29 years old, 23.1% 30-44 years old, 34.1% 45-64 years old, 22.9% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 88.7% White, 5.9% Black or African American, 1.9% Asian, 4.3% Hispanic or Latino, 0.0% Native American or Alaska Native, 0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 1.4% two or more races
- Breakdown by education: 1.9% less than high school education, 5.1% some high school (no diploma), 31.0% high school graduate or equivalency, 22.6% some college (no degree), 10.4% associate's degree, 19.7% bachelor's degree, 9.4% graduate or professional degree

A notable swing state with 10 electoral votes, Wisconsin plays an essential role in the presidential election, based on the 2016 results. The Badger State was relatively undecided four years ago; it only preferred the GOP ticket over the Democratic one by less than 1%. Including the 2016 election, Wisconsin has chosen the successful president 76.7% of the time.

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Wyoming

- Voting-eligible population: 434,852
- Breakdown by sex: 50.7% male, 49.3% female
- Breakdown by age: 20.7% 18-29 years old, 24.6% 30-44 years old, 32.1% 45-64 years old, 22.6% 65+ years old
- Breakdown by race: 93.0% White, 7.7% Hispanic or Latino, data not available for other races
- Breakdown by education: 1.3% less than high school education, 4.5% some high school (no diploma), 30.5% high school graduate or equivalency, 25.8% some college (no degree), 11.2% associate's degree, 17.4% bachelor's degree, 9.2% graduate or professional degree

Of all U.S. states, Wyoming has the lowest population, slimming down its collective voting pool. However, unlike other regions where the populace affects electoral votes, Wyoming is notably overrepresented in the Electoral College, which has caused some concern in past elections. White voters account for a large majority of the ballots cast in Wyoming, which has voted Republican in every presidential election since 1952 except for one.

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