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Notable new words coined the year you were born

  • 2000: Bokeh, geocaching

    Other notable words: google, speed dating, Sudoku, tanga, TiVo, walk back

    First popularized in 1997, bokeh has become increasingly popular in rendering out-of-focus backgrounds in digital photography. Created in 2000 by David Ulmer and named by Matt Stum, geocaching is a worldwide phenomenon today.

  • 2001: Bromance, captcha

    Other notable words: cankle, click fraud, goliath grouper, Internet of Things, tadalafil, twerking

    Although its origins aren't confirmed, the concept of bromance entered popular usage in 2001. Created as a tool and coined as a word this year, captcha foils automatic computerized registrations without human confirmation.

  • 2002: Dubstep, selfie

    Other notable words: exoneree, goji berry, humblebrag, norovirus, thumb drive, vlog

    Earlier versions of dubstep in 1998 were more experimental than the genre of music that became mainstream in 2002. A drunk Australian man is said to have taken the first selfie this year.

  • 2003: Baby bump, severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Other notable words: binge-watch, electronic cigarette, manscaping, muffin top, net neutrality, unfriend

    Hollywood programs and celebrity magazines enjoy pointing out female stars' baby bumps, beginning the term with Debra Messing in 2003. Animals in China could have spread the epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2003.

  • 2004: E-waste, social media

    Other notable words: life back, paywall, podcast, roentgenium, Silver Alert, waterboarding

    Signed into law in 2003 and amended in 2004, the Electronic Waste Recycling Act is designed to help consumers safely recycle their e-waste. Although social media began on sites including Friendster and Myspace, its popularity permeated the internet with the advent of Facebook in 2004.

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  • 2005: Glamping, locavore

    Other notable words: didymo, microblogging, ransomware, sexting, truther, vodcast

    Although glamorous camping has been around for centuries, luxurious tent camping earned the name ‘glamping’ in the U.K. in 2005. Challenging San Francisco residents to eat only local foods sourced within 100 miles, Jessica Prentice coined the term locavore in 2005 with Dede Sampson and Sage Van Wing.

  • 2006: Crowdfunding, sizzle reel

    Other notable words: agender, bucket list, crowdsourcing, Eris, hypermiling, mumblecore, ski cross

    Michael Sullivan is credited with creating the term ‘crowdfunding’ in 2006 after launching fundavlog, a failed attempt to create funding for video-blog projects. Also known as a showreel or demo reel, a sizzle reel, showcases actors' or presenters' previous works.

  • 2007: Additive manufacturing, colony collapse disorder

    Other notable words: hashtag, listicle, netbook, sharing economy, tweep

    3-D printing, one of seven recognized categories of additive manufacturing, helped vault the term into the Merriam-Webster Dictionary in 2007. During winter 2006–2007, beekeepers reported losses of up to 90% of their hives due to colony collapse disorder.

  • 2008: Bitcoin, mansplain

    Other notable words: burner phone, dumpster fire, exome, frenemy, hate-watch, photobomb

    Originated as an electronic cash system in 2008, bitcoin's growth continued into 2017, when the price of one peaked at $17,900. Rebecca Solnit published critiques discussing mansplaining, a term she coined this year.

  • 2009: Alt-right, subtweet

    Other notable words: anti-vaxxer, censorware, copernicium, glocal, lipectomy, taxflation

    Making it to the Merriam-Webster dictionary this year, "alt-right" refers to white supremacists, neo-Nazis and other groups on the far right of the political spectrum. A subtweet, added this year, is addressed to a recipient without using their name or Twitter handle.

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