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States with the most hailstorms

  • #17. West Virginia

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 118
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $6.3 million (#19 lowest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $0.35 (#23 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Taylor ($4.3 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: An east to west front had lifted north into southern Ohio and northern West Virginia during the day. By mid afternoon, the front was south of Columbus Ohio to near the Mason Dixon line around Morgantown. More clouds and cooler temperatures lingered north of the boundary. In southern Ohio and western West Virginia, more sunshine allowed for warmer temperatures and increased instability during the afternoon. Temperatures had warmed to the mid and upper 70s with dew points in the lower 60s. Thunderstorms formed during the mid afternoon and moved east. One long-lived cell came across the Ohio River and into Wood County producing large hail.

  • #16. Missouri

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 128
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $19.3 million (#23 lowest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $0.32 (#24 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2011 storm in Jackson ($7 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: April 3, 2011, was an abnormally warm day, with high temperatures in the 80s and 90s. Record high temperatures were broken in several locations. A slow moving cold front, combined with a very strong spring storm system, produced widespread damaging thunderstorms, in the late afternoon and evening hours. Supercellular thunderstorms, developed along and ahead of the cold front, as it sank southward across the area. These thunderstorms produced extremely large hail, greater than golf balls in many areas, as well as damaging winds of 60 to 80 mph.

  • #15. New Mexico

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 136
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $28.1 million (#22 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $1.34 (#18 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2010 storm in Bernalillo ($7.8 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: A lone severe thunderstorm developed near San Felipe Pueblo and moved east-southeast along the east mountains. Hail up to two inches in diameter fell and devastated trees, roofs, windshields, and windows across the area.

  • #14. Arkansas

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 177
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $71 million (#15 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $2.36 (#14 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2009 storm in Pulaski ($65.0 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: While the atmosphere dried out, it heated up on the 30. Scattered thunderstorms bubbled up quickly across the north and built into the central counties. A devastating hailstorm struck parts of Pulaski and Lonoke counties late in the afternoon.

  • #13. North Dakota

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 177
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $95.1 million (#14 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $12.51 (#6 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2016 storm in Burleigh ($50.3 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: A slow-moving isolated supercell developed in Morton County along a weak cold front during the evening hours in an environment with very strong instability and significant low level moisture. The storms grew into a large bow echo that propagated northeast in a moisture rich environment, with a few supercells developing ahead of the bow. The greatest amount of damage occurred in the Bismarck area of Burleigh County, where very strong wind gusts combined with hail as large as baseballs causing extensive damage to northern portions of the city along with rural locations to the north. The strongest winds were reported in Hettinger County near Bert, where gusts to 80 mph occurred.

  • #12. New York

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 183
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $3.5 million (#16 lowest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $0.02 (#11 lowest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2012 storm in Tompkins ($1.1 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: An upper level disturbance moved across upstate New York. With a moist and unstable air mass already in place, showers and thunderstorms developed across much of the region. Many of these storms produced hail, and in some cases the hail was very large and produced scattered damage.

  • #11. North Carolina

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 193
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $26.1 million (#23 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $0.25 (#22 lowest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2017 storm in Wake ($12 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: The remnants of Harvey increased the southwesterly flow over Central North Carolina as it moved northeastward through Tennessee and Kentucky. In the wake of the northward moving warm front, a cold front moved into and stalled over Central North Carolina providing lift in the strongly sheared, moist environment. The resulting thunderstorms became severe, producing damaging wind gusts, large hail, and flash flooding.

  • #10. Georgia

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 251
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $239.5 million (#8 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $2.28 (#15 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Henry ($41 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: A strong upper level system combined with a moist south to southeast flow, moderate instability, a cold pool aloft, and enhanced surface convergence along and ahead of an approaching cold front moving through the Deep South. This combination of parameters resulted in widespread severe weather across northwest, west central, and central Georgia including damaging winds, large hail, and a tornado. A wedge of cold air was in place across northeast Georgia, which acted to stabilize this area with only isolated reports of severe weather. The bulk of the severe weather was concentrated along a zone just to the south and west of the wedge front, where instability and low-level shear were maximized.

  • #9. Kansas

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 289
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $242.3 million (#7 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $8.32 (#9 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2010 storm in Sedgwick ($150 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: A combination of a low pressure area along the Kansas Oklahoma border, and an outflow boundary across South Central Kansas, led to the development of supercell thunderstorms across South Central Kansas. The supercells thunderstorms were noted for a swath of very large hail that extended from West Wichita to near Udall Kansas. Numerous reports of grapefruit or larger hail were reported across Wichita, with one such hail stone in West Wichita, Kansas, breaking the state record for diameter of 7.75 inches. A few weak tornadoes were also produced, with all the tornadoes moving across open country.

  • #8. Mississippi

    - Total hailstorms, 20092018: 324
    - Total property damage caused by hailstorms: $566.3 million (#4 highest)
    - Annual property damage per capita: $18.96 (#4 highest)
    - Worst hailstorm: 2013 storm in Hinds ($556.8 million in property damage)
    - Event description from NOAA: A strong upper level disturbance combined with a strong cold front and associated surface low which crossed the region. A squall line developed across southeast Arkansas and moved quickly across north-central Mississippi during the morning, producing multiple reports of damaging winds and ping-pong to golf ball size hail. There were reports of multiple trees blown down, some roofs blown off buildings and wind gusts of 60-80 mph, with a 77 mph wind gust measured at the Columbus AFB surface observing station.

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