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50 most popular Republican politicians today

  • #40. Michele Bachmann

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 19%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 42% (36th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 58% (68th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 31% (62nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 26% (14th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 34% (48th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 22%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 18%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 60%

    In Congress, Michele Bachmann set up the conservative House Tea Party Caucus and gave the tea party’s response to Barack Obama’s 2011 State of the Union address. The same year, she made a presidential bid that ended when she placed sixth in the Iowa caucus. Bachmann worked for Jimmy Carter's presidential campaign in 1976, and has said she changed her political views after reading Gore Vidal’s historical novel “Burr.”

    [Pictured: Carlos Watson, Michele Bachmann, and Vanessa Carlton attend the "Take On America" discussion panel presented by Ozy Media in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 15, 2018.]

  • #39. Rick Santorum

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 20%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 39% (82nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 61% (22nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 29% (75th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 23% (64th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 38% (22nd most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 32%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 22%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 74%

    As a rising star in the Republican party, Rick Santorum and other members in the House so-called gang of seven took on members of Congress who were bouncing checks without penalty at the House bank. He was a major opponent of same-sex marriage and of abortion rights, and sponsored a 2003 measure to criminalize ending late-term pregnancies.

    [Pictured: Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum attends the CBS News and Politico 2019 White House Correspondents' Dinner Pre-Party at the Washington Hilton on April 27, 2019.]

  • #38. Chris Christie

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 20%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 43% (33rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 57% (71st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 28% (83rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 26% (15th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 36% (37th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 41%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 21%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 82%

    The former New Jersey governor raised conservative hackles when he praised President Barack Obama and the federal government’s response in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Chris Christie was long considered to be a presidential contender, but his political fortunes fell in so-called Bridgegate, when his staff was accused of orchestrating traffic jams at the George Washington Bridge to punish a local mayor who had failed to support him. A Trump supporter, Christie says he has turned down several offers to join in the administration.

    [Pictured: Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks onstage during the 2019 Concordia Annual Summit - Day 1 at Grand Hyatt New York on Sept. 23, 2019.]

  • #37. Scott Walker

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 20%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 39% (76th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 61% (29th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 30% (67th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 22% (83rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 39% (18th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 24%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 15%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 59%

    During Scott Walker’s administration as governor of Wisconsin, a controversial budget measure was passed in 2011 that slashed benefits and the collective bargaining rights of public employees, including teachers and firefighters. Walker survived a recall vote the following year and made a brief presidential bid in 2015.

    [Pictured: Gov. Scott Walker (WI-R) speaks to supporters at a last-minute get out the vote rally the night before the midterm elections at Weldall Mfg., Inc. on Nov. 5, 2018.]

  • #36. Dan Quayle

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 20%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 42% (35th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 58% (69th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 28% (79th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 27% (5th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 37% (33rd most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 31%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 27%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 78%

    Dan Quayle was little known nationally before the youthful U.S. senator from Indiana was selected in 1988 to be George H.W. Bush’s running mate. The vice president was a voice for conservatism and an advocate of business deregulation in the Bush administration, but struggled to be taken seriously. He famously criticized the popular “Murphy Brown” television show for lacking family values and misspelled "potato" as "potatoe" in an appearance at a school spelling bee.

    [Pictured: Former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle attends a Veterans Day event at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery on Nov. 11, 2019.]

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  • #35. Tim Scott

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 21%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 40% (66th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 60% (38th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 33% (53rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 25% (30th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 34% (50th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 11%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 16%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 48%

    When Tim Scott served on South Carolina’s Charleston City Council in 1997, he posted the Ten Commandments outside of the building, prompting a lawsuit. Now he is the only black Republican in the U.S. Senate, where he has sided with the Trump administration on issues such as tax reform, efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and two Supreme Court justice nominations. But Scott took issue when President Donald Trump attacked four female minority House members, calling the president’s remarks “racially offensive,” and he helped sink two of Trump’s judicial appointees over racial issues.

    [Pictured: Senator Tim Scott (R-S.C.) attends a Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on new coronavirus tests on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. on May 7, 2020.]

  • #34. Rick Scott

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 21%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 39% (79th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 61% (25th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 32% (58th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 21% (97th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 38% (25th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 24%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 17%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 62%

    Coming from a poor family, Rick Scott rose to become chief executive of Columbia/HCA, the nation’s largest private, for-profit hospital chain. As governor of Florida from 2011-2019, he opposed expansion of Medicaid and tighter environmental regulations and supported offshore oil drilling. But after the Parkland school shooting, he signed a gun control law that instituted a three-day waiting period for gun purchases, raised the minimum age for ownership to 21, and tightened mental health requirements. He was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2018.

    [Pictured: Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) speaks during a press conference at the U.S. Capitol March 25, 2020.]

  • #33. Bobby Jindal

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 21%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 40% (62nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 60% (42nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 31% (63rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 22% (90th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 35% (42nd most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 19%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 17%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 58%

    Bobby Jindal served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives and two terms as governor of Louisiana. His high-profile Republican response to President Barack Obama’s first address to a joint session of Congress in 2009 was widely criticized as amateur and poorly delivered. The son of Indian immigrants, Jindal announced a presidential bid in 2015 that never gained much traction.

    [Pictured: Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-La.) introduces Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to a crowd of supporters at Courtyards of Andover Event Center in Andover, Minnesota.]

  • #32. Paul Ryan

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 21%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 47% (7th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 53% (97th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 35% (42nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 24% (40th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 31% (64th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 44%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 19%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 85%

    Paul Ryan was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Wisconsin in 1998 and re-elected nine times. In 2012, he was Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s running mate. Ryan was critical of Donald Trump ahead of the 2016 presidential election, but backed off after Trump’s victory. Ryan’s poll ratings slipped in 2017 after the House, where he was speaker, failed to overturn the Affordable Care Act that had become President Barack Obama’s legacy.

    [Pictured: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) delivers a farewell address in the Great Hall of the Library of Congress Jefferson Building on Capitol Hill Dec. 19, 2018.]

  • #31. Donald Rumsfeld

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 21%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 41% (49th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 59% (55th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 27% (87th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 24% (52nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 39% (16th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 29%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 24%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 74%

    Donald Rumsfeld had a long career in politics, serving in the U.S. House of Representatives; as U.S. ambassador to NATO; and as secretary of defense twice, under President Gerald Ford and under President George W. Bush. He was a major supporter of the United States-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. In late 2008, Rumsfeld was strongly criticized in a U.S. Senate report for authorizing aggressive interrogation techniques at the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay and contributing to the abuse of detainees there as well as in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    [Pictured: (From left) US Defense Secretary Mark Esper, former US president George W. Bush, and former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld take part in a wreath-laying ceremony to mark the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, on Sept. 11, 2019, at the Pentagon in Washington D.C.]

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