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50 most popular Republican politicians today

  • #20. Barry Goldwater

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 25%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 41% (55th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 59% (49th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 30% (72nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 21% (98th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 38% (21st most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 17%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 27%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 69%

    Barry Goldwater’s entrance into politics began in Phoenix when he was elected to serve as city councilman in 1949. By 1952, he won his first election to the U.S. Senate, where he served five terms from 1953–1964 and 1969–1987. It was during his run for president in 1964 that the Republican party chose the highly conservative Goldwater as the nominee over the liberal-leaning Nelson Rockefeller. Goldwater lost the presidential election to President Lyndon Johnson, but as a candidate who opposed Communism, was fiscally conservative, defended personal freedoms, and opposed Democratic civil rights legislation, he helped the conservatives take control of the South, which subsequently aided in getting eight Republican presidents elected in the 13 elections held since that time. The author of numerous books on political conservatism, Goldwater died in 1998 at his suburban Phoenix home.

    [Pictured: Republican Presidential Candidate Barry Goldwater, U.S. Senator from Arizona, on the night of the New Hampshire primary, March 10, 1964.]

  • #19. Mitch McConnell

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 25%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 43% (21st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 57% (83rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 29% (78th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 23% (60th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 38% (26th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 41%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 18%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 84%

    A U. S. senator from Kentucky and Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell was a vocal opponent of President Barack Obama. He refused to allow a hearing for Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland on grounds that there was less than a year left in the president’s term in office. As an ally of President Donald Trump, he played a key role in the confirmation of Trump’s controversial nominee Brett Kavanaugh to the highest court, and led Republican opposition in the Senate to the impeachment effort.

    [Pictured: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, speaks to the media following the weekly Republican Senate policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., May 19, 2020.]

  • #18. Lindsey Graham

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 25%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 44% (17th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 56% (87th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 29% (76th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 22% (86th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 38% (23rd most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 36%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 17%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 78%

    For a long time, Lindsey Graham was known as a champion of bipartisanship, who was willing to negotiate, strike deals, and work with Democrats on issues like climate change and immigration. During the Trump administration, he has backed off his moderate stance and has become a combative supporter of the president. Graham first entered the national public eye with his scathing criticism of President Bill Clinton during his impeachment proceedings in 1999.

    [Pictured: Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) is seen during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing to discuss the FBI's "Crossfire Hurricane" investigation in the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington D.C. on June 3, 2020.]

  • #17. Dick Cheney

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 26%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 42% (34th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 58% (70th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 28% (82nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 24% (44th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 37% (30th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 42%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 23%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 91%

    A longtime Washington insider, Dick Cheney was secretary of defense under President George H. W. Bush, overseeing Operation Desert Storm in the Middle East. As vice president to George W. Bush from 2001–2009, in the wake of 9/11, Cheney was an advocate for the U.S. war on terror and the 2003 invasion of Iraq; set up the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, where he supported harsh interrogation techniques; and designed anti-terrorist citizen surveillance. In the private sector, he headed up Halliburton, a giant petroleum engineering company that specializes in fracking, the extraction method that uses high-pressure water and chemicals to tap into underground natural gas and oil reserves.

    [Pictured: Former Vice President Dick Cheney greets former President Barack Obama during the state funeral for former President George H.W. Bush at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. on Dec. 5, 2018.]

  • #16. Trey Gowdy

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 26%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 41% (43rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 59% (61st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 24% (99th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 20% (102nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 43% (5th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 19%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 13%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 58%

    Trey Gowdy spent four terms in the U.S. House of Representatives representing South Carolina, starting in 2010. He led the House Select Committee’s investigation into the 2012 attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, which focused on the role of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He later served on the House Intelligence Committee, investigating Russian involvement in the 2016 election, and was chairman of the House Oversight Committee that investigated Clinton's emails. After he retired, he went into private law practice.

    [Pictured: House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) leaves a closed-door hearing on Capitol Hill Dec. 7, 2018.]

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  • #15. Rand Paul

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 26%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 40% (71st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 60% (33rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 28% (80th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 23% (63rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 37% (29th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 33%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 21%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 81%

    In 2013, the Kentucky senator delivered the tea party’s response to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address. A libertarian, he has called for dramatic spending cuts in foreign aid and the federal domestic budget, and for downsizing the government, including shutting down the department of education and privatizing the Transportation Security Administration. He has become a strong supporter of President Donald Trump.

    [Pictured: U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) listens to testimony during the Senate Committee for Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on COVID-19 on May 12, 2020.]

  • #14. Elizabeth Dole

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 27%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 48% (4th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 52% (100th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 25% (98th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 24% (38th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 42% (7th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 17%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 27%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 71%

    Elizabeth Dole was transportation secretary under President Ronald Reagan and labor secretary under President George H.W. Bush. She left the cabinet to head up the American Red Cross, and in 1999 was a contender for the Republican presidential nomination. She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2002 and also was considered an effective campaigner in her husband Sen. Bob Dole’s presidential bids.

    [Pictured: Sen. Elizabeth Dole is seen during "The Today Show" broadcast at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 23, 2019.]

  • #13. Marco Rubio

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 27%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 45% (11th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 55% (93rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 27% (89th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 26% (16th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 37% (27th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 35%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 22%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 84%

    The son of Cuban immigrants, the Florida senator in 2013 gave the first bilingual Republican response to the State of the Union. An opponent of the Affordable Care Act and of abortion rights, he made an unsuccessful presidential bid in 2016 but lost the primary in his home state of Florida. He has been a supporter of President Donald Trump, although he did not back the president’s plans for a border wall, and he supported sanctions against Russia that Trump opposed. As chairman of the Senate’s Small Business Committee, he has been active in designing coronavirus economic relief measures.

    [Pictured: Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) leaves the Senate floor during a recess in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Feb. 3, 2020.]

  • #12. Newt Gingrich

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 29%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 40% (58th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 60% (46th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 22% (102nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 22% (79th most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 46% (1st most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 36%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 19%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 84%

    The Georgia Congressman and more than 300 other Republicans signed a “Contract With America” in 1994, filled with conservative calls for tax cuts, smaller government, fewer regulations, and congressional term limits. That fall, Republicans took control of the House for the first time since 1955, and Gingrich took the top job as majority speaker. An impasse with President Bill Clinton over congressional demands for deep budget cuts led to a shutdown of the government, first for five days and then for 21 days. Gingrich made an ill-fated bid for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. The former college history professor has written more than 20 books.

    [Pictured: Newt Gingrich and U.S. ambassador Callista Gingrich pose in front of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City on Oct. 13, 2019.]

  • #11. Nikki Haley

    - Positive opinion of this politician: 29%
    --- Positive opinion among women: 39% (81st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among men: 61% (23rd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Millennials: 26% (92nd most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Generation X: 22% (81st most popular Republican)
    --- Positive opinion among Baby Boomers: 42% (8th most popular Republican)
    - Negative opinion of this politician: 22%
    - Neutral opinion of this politician: 15%
    - People who have heard of this politician: 67%

    Nikki Haley was U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President Donald Trump for two years. Before that, she was governor of South Carolina, where she was a tea party conservative. Haley won national kudos in 2015 when, in the wake of a racially-inspired mass church shooting, she called for the removal of the Confederate flag from the state capitol. At the U.N., where she served with no previous experience in foreign policy, she defended Trump's controversial decision to move the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem; his withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal; and his decision to pull out of the international Paris Agreement on climate change. Haley has been suggested as a potential presidential candidate in 2024.

    [Pictured: Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley visits "Fox & Friends" at Fox News Channel Studios in New York City on Nov. 12, 2019.]

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