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100 worst comedies of all time

  • 100 worst comedies of all time

    The notion that terrible films are often funny for being so inept is certainly applicable in the sci-fi or horror genres. But how can the worst comedies be funny in their failure to be funny? Therein lies the paradox and the reason why bad comedies are usually just plain bad.

    Nevertheless, it's been said that anything worth doing is worth doing badly—comedy is certainly no exception. With this in mind, Stacker compiled IMDb and Metacritic data on all comedy movies with more than 2,500 votes on IMDb and ranked them by Stacker score, an equally weighted index between Metascore and IMDb user rating, with #1 being the worst. Ties were broken by Metascore and further ties were broken by IMDb user rating. If a movie did not have a Metascore, it was not considered.

    When it comes to the worst comedies of all time, the early aughts were a particularly robust period. Part of the blame falls directly at the feet of general viewing audiences, who continued to flock to abominable fare year after year. Take, for example, the “filmmaking” duo of Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer, best known for their famously lazy parodies. What should have started and ended with 2006’s “Date Movie” instead became a mini-empire of similarly atrocious spoofery.

    Speaking of atrocious spoofs, remember David Zucker? The once-legendary co-creator of films like “Airplane!” and “The Naked Gun” sunk to impressive lows in the later part of his career. His name pops up more than a few times on the list of worst comedies. So too does Larry the Cable Guy, who managed to turn one prolonged fart joke into three consecutive films, all of which made the list. Toilet humor, in general, is a recurring theme in bad comedy. Just ask Happy Madison Productions, which continues to litter the halls of cinema history with its endless barrage of filmic flatulence.

    Here are the worst comedies of all time, as of Dec. 17.

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  • #100. Strange Wilderness (2008)

    - Director: Fred Wolf
    - Stacker score: 35.3
    - Metascore: 12
    - IMDb user rating: 5.3
    - Runtime: 87 minutes

    Industry veteran Fred Wolf co-wrote and directed this low-budget stoner comedy. It follows a struggling TV crew as it searches for Bigfoot in hopes of a ratings surge. Even by Happy Madison standards, the movie’s Rotten Tomatoes critic score of 2% is quite low.

  • #99. The Honeymooners (2005)

    - Director: John Schultz
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 31
    - IMDb user rating: 3.3
    - Runtime: 90 minutes

    Jackie Gleason’s shoes prove too big to fill in this movie adaptation of an iconic TV series. Comedian Cedric the Entertainer plays Ralph Kramden, a mischievous bus driver with big ideas. The film opened at #8 during its first week of release and went downhill from there.

  • #98. The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (2000)

    - Director: Brian Levant
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 27
    - IMDb user rating: 3.7
    - Runtime: 90 minutes

    The second time was not the charm for this live-action prequel to the 1994 box office smash “The Flintstones.” Devoid of the original cast, it came off as little more than a corporate cash grab and an unsuccessful one at that. Join the Flintstones and the Rubbles for a rollicking trip to Rock Vegas—or don’t.

  • #97. McHale’s Navy (1997)

    - Director: Bryan Spicer
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 18
    - IMDb user rating: 4.6
    - Runtime: 108 minutes

    Presenting yet another failed adaptation of an old TV series, with Tom Arnold starring as Lt. Cmdr. Quinton McHale. Upon reuniting with his old crew, McHale battles Russian adversaries on the high seas. The film was one among a number of box office bombs from studio head Sid Sheinberg and his short-lived production company, The Bubble Factory.

  • #96. Kickin’ It Old Skool (2007)

    - Director: Harvey Glazer
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 18
    - IMDb user rating: 4.6
    - Runtime: 107 minutes

    Comedian Jamie Kennedy dialed his wannabe persona all the way up for this abysmal slice of pop culture nostalgia. An immature breakdancer played by Kennedy wakes from a 20-year coma and tries to pick things up exactly where they left off. As cheesy as the movie may be, some fans do enjoy its retro obsessions.

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  • #95. A Haunted House 2 (2014)

    - Director: Michael Tiddes
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 17
    - IMDb user rating: 4.7
    - Runtime: 86 minutes

    Marlon Wayans co-wrote and starred in this crude parody of the found footage horror sub-genre. A sequel to 2013’s “A Haunted House,” it covers similar terrain with even less panache. The story follows Malcolm Johnson, played by Wayans, into a new home, where he squares off against a paranormal entity once again.

  • #94. I Hate Valentine’s Day (2009)

    - Director: Nia Vardalos
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 17
    - IMDb user rating: 4.7
    - Runtime: 98 minutes

    A florist named Genevieve, played by Nia Vardalos, hates Valentine’s Day—and most critics and audiences hated this movie. As the creator of “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” filmmaker and star Vardalos fails to conjure any of the same magic. The result is a poorly written, highly predictable exercise in tired genre tropes.

  • #93. Cannonball Run II (1984)

    - Directors: Hal Needham, Ralph Bakshi
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 13
    - IMDb user rating: 5.1
    - Runtime: 108 minutes

    Burt Reynolds is back for another race and so too is much of the original cast for this critically maligned sequel. Audiences were less receptive than they were the first time around, though it didn’t stop the film from turning a profit. With appearances from Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., and Shirley MacLaine, this was the final movie to co-star members of the Hollywood Rat Pack.

  • #92. Nine Lives (2016)

    - Director: Barry Sonnenfeld
    - Stacker score: 34.8
    - Metascore: 11
    - IMDb user rating: 5.3
    - Runtime: 87 minutes

    In this completely unnecessary addition to the talking animal sub-genre, billionaire Tom Brand, (Kevin Spacey) gets trapped inside a cat’s body. Director Barry Sonnenfeld and five credited screenwriters couldn’t stop it from becoming one of the worst-reviewed releases of 2016. More amusing than the film itself is GQ’s mock “Oral History,” which pretends to go behind the scenes.

  • #91. Fifty Shades of Black (2016)

    - Director: Michael Tiddes
    - Stacker score: 34.2
    - Metascore: 28
    - IMDb user rating: 3.5
    - Runtime: 92 minutes

    Marlon Wayans re-teamed with “A Haunted House” director Michael Tiddes for yet another crude and anemic spoof. As the title would suggest, "Fifty Shades of Black" sets out to skewer the mega-popular “50 Shades of Grey” franchise. Some critics were quick to point out that the source material was, unintentionally, funny enough on its own.

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