100 best horror movies of all time

Written by:
October 23, 2020
The Associates & Aldrich Company

100 best horror movies of all time

Horror stands alone as a form of cinematic entertainment. Like a shot of adrenaline, the best examples are often measured by their ability to stimulate the senses. Rarely will one find Oscar-worthy monologues or painstaking character development. Even basic logic can be hard to come by, as movies like “Scream” point out. But that doesn’t matter, because horror movies aren’t overly concerned with logic or rationale. To put it as plainly as possible: entertainment is the point.

Great horror also functions as a cathartic outlet, and a streamlined one at that. Tapping into deeply-rooted fears and desires, the genre cultivates a whirlwind of primitive indulgence. Viewers can experience the thrill of running from a monster or just barely surviving through the night. Thanks to the iconic POV shot, one can even step into the killer’s shoes on occasion. If there’s a pretext, it’s that audiences leave their lofty ideals and moral judgments at home. With an open mind (and empty stomach), one can strap into their seat and take a proverbial roller coaster ride. It’s no wonder that the genre has such a dedicated fan base.

That’s not to say horror goes short on symbolism or social commentary. On the contrary, many of the best horror films are filled to the brim with metaphor and prescient subtext. Jordan Peele’s blockbuster “Get Out” explores racism through the lens of historical hierarchies. The French film “Raw” uses cannibalism as a metaphor for pubescent urges, while Norway’s “Thelma” conjures psychokinetic power out of religious repression. Proto-slashers like “Psycho” are chock full of mommy issues and even “Halloween” retains a psychological edge.

Stacker compiled data on all horror movies to come up with a Stacker score, i.e., a weighted index split evenly between IMDb and Metacritic scores as of Oct. 13, 2020. To qualify, the film had to be listed as horror on IMDb, have a Metascore, and have at least 25,000 votes. Ties were broken by Metascore and further ties were broken by IMDb user rating. Because they don’t fall under the “horror” banner on IMDb, classics such as “Jaws,” “The Silence of the Lambs,” and “The Sixth Sense” didn’t make the list.

Every film that did make the list has been considered according to the cinematic history and development of horror. An exception was made on behalf of three essential horror movies, whose lack of a Metascore inaccurately reflects their place in film history: "Nosferatu," "Diabolique," and "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.” Each of these films has a Stacker score that reflects its respective IMDb user rating and has been ranked accordingly.

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1 / 100
New Line Cinema

#100. The Conjuring (2013)

- Director: James Wan
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 68
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 112 minutes

Here’s a movie so terrifying that it was reportedly given an R rating for the “scare factor” alone. Helmed by James Wan, it sends a pair of paranormal investigators to a haunted farmhouse. A critical and commercial smash, the film spawned an ongoing franchise.

2 / 100
Castelao Producciones

#99. REC (2007)

- Directors: Jaume Balagueró, Paco Plaza
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 69
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 78 minutes

A high point of the found footage subgenre, “REC” locks a TV reporter and her crew inside an apartment building infected by a deadly virus. Hailing from Spain, the film was remade in America under the name “Quarantine.” The Spanish version yielded three sequels, while its inferior American counterpart yielded one.

3 / 100
Warner Bros.

#98. Gremlins (1984)

- Director: Joe Dante
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 70
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 106 minutes

When a young man (Zach Galligan) fails to properly care for his adorable new pet, it unleashes a horde of monsters upon his small town. The seminal ’80s flick packed just enough darkness into a family-friendly package, which only broadened its appeal. Look for an uncredited cameo from executive producer Steven Spielberg.

4 / 100
Celador Films

#97. The Descent (2005)

- Director: Neil Marshall
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 99 minutes

Trail a group of friends into the deep recesses of a dark cave, where something deadly awaits. With its palpable themes of psychological trauma, “Descent” takes on more gravitas than the standard monster fare. Its original ending was deemed too dark for American audiences, leading to a revised cut.

5 / 100
A24

#96. Midsommar (2019)

- Director: Ari Aster
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 148 minutes

Director Ari Aster tackled the folk horror subgenre with this heralded sophomore effort. It follows a group of American friends into the heart of rural Sweden, where they partake in a pagan ceremony. A young woman named Dani (Florence Pugh) discovers she’ll be purging herself of more than just the past.

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6 / 100
Universal Pictures

#95. The Invisible Man (2020)

- Director: Leigh Whannell
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 124 minutes

From “Saw” co-creator Leigh Whannell comes this clever reinvention of a classic horror story. After fleeing from her abusive boyfriend, a young woman (Elisabeth Moss) must grapple with his unique brand of untraceable vengeance. A substantial hit, the film breathed new life into Universal’s pending slate of monster movie remakes.

7 / 100
Caliber Media Company

#94. Bone Tomahawk (2015)

- Director: S. Craig Zahler
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 132 minutes

One might hear the term “Western horror” and think of gunslinging skeletons, but this film finds all of its scares in the natural world. Starring Kurt Russell, it’s about a devoted man trying to save his wife from a group of savage cannibals. A slow build culminates with some truly grotesque visuals. This one’s not for the faint of heart...or stomach.

8 / 100
Element Pictures

#93. The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017)

- Director: Yorgos Lanthimos
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 121 minutes

Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos cultivates a world that’s equal parts familiar and alien in this unsettling thriller. It’s by walking this deft line that the movie squeezes tension out of even the most casual exchange. Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman star as an upper crust married couple, who must deal with the fallout of a deadly curse.

9 / 100
Basque Films

#92. The Platform (2019)

- Director: Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 94 minutes

A dystopian prison doubles as an allegory for socio-economic despair in this Spanish thriller. Inmates are randomly placed on a vertical system, which spoils those at the top and torments those at the bottom. It won the People's Choice Award for Midnight Madness at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival before getting scooped up by Netflix.

10 / 100
Walt Disney Pictures

#91. Frankenweenie (2012)

- Director: Tim Burton
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 87 minutes

It’s the tale of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” as only director Tim Burton can imagine it. Adapting his own black-and-white short film, Burton substitutes a young boy for the mad scientist and a loyal pet dog for the infamous monster. Vivid 3D stop-motion animation brings the story to life.

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11 / 100
Intrepid Pictures

#90. Gerald's Game (2017)

- Director: Mike Flanagan
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 77
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Runtime: 103 minutes

Director Mike Flanagan adapted a Stephen King novel for this Netflix thriller, set almost entirely in a remote lake. When her husband dies in the midst of a sex game, a woman (Carla Gugino) must break free from her handcuffs if she wants to survive. Flanagan went on to direct another Stephen King adaptation (2019’s “Doctor Sleep”), and has plans to do more.

12 / 100
Film4

#89. Under the Skin (2013)

- Director: Jonathan Glazer
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 6.3
- Runtime: 108 minutes

An invasion movie quite like any other, this one counterbalances stark realism with brooding artistry. Taking the form of a young woman, a wandering alien (Scarlett Johansson) lures unwitting men to a deadly layer. Those expecting a film in the vein of “Species” or “Alien” are bound to be disappointed, while others may be pleasantly surprised.

13 / 100
Jofa-Atelier Berlin-Johannisthal

#88. Nosferatu (1922)

- Director: F.W. Murnau
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: data not available
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 94 minutes

An early benchmark in horror, this German expressionist classic adapted Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” without legal permission. Stoker’s estate sued for copyright infringement and the movie just barely survived. Actor Max Schreck delivers an iconic performance as the vampire, who pines for the affection of another man’s wife.

14 / 100
CJ Entertainment

#87. Thirst (2009)

- Director: Park Chan-wook
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 134 minutes

Best-known for the acclaimed Vengeance Trilogy, South Korean director Park Chan-wook brought his grim sensibilities to the vampire subgenre. The result was this gothic outing, which confronts a pious priest with all kinds of taboo temptations. It won the Jury Prize at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival.

15 / 100
Motlys

#86. Thelma (2017)

- Director: Joachim Trier
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 116 minutes

Suppressed urges take on a literal dimension in this Norwegian supernatural thriller. It centers on a religious girl named Thelma (Eili Harboe), who manifests psychokinetic powers in the wake of a conflicting romance. Writing for the Washington Post, critic Ann Hornaday called it “a stylish, timely allegory for the present moment.”

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16 / 100
Semi-Professional

#85. Housebound (2014)

- Director: Gerard Johnstone
- Stacker score: 79
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 107 minutes

A woman is put under house arrest in her childhood home, which she soon suspects is haunted. Is the house actually inhabited by an evil spirit or is it all in her head? Walking the line between the psychological and supernatural, this New Zealand horror comedy delivers no shortage of clever twists.

17 / 100
Softbank Ventures

#84. I Saw the Devil (2010)

- Director: Kim Jee-woon
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 67
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 144 minutes

All bets are off in this South Korean thriller, which pushes the limits of sex and violence. The story begins with the murder of a young woman at the hands of a vicious serial killer. In his pursuit of justice, the woman’s fiancé unleashes the monster within.

18 / 100
Empire Pictures

#83. Re-Animator (1985)

- Director: Stuart Gordon
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 104 minutes

Stuart Gordon’s “Re-Animator” is the stuff that cult followings are made of. Based on a story by H.P. Lovecraft, it follows an eccentric medical student as he brings the dead back to life. Expect loads of campy acting and buckets of blood...about 25 gallons worth, according to legend.

19 / 100
Snowfort Pictures

#82. The Endless (2017)

- Directors: Justin Benson, Aaron Moorhead
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Runtime: 111 minutes

Filmmakers Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead make deft use of a low budget in this trippy sci-fi thriller. Upon visiting the cult from which they once escaped, two brothers enter a new kind of trap. The story takes place in the same universe as a previous film from Benson and Moorhead, 2012’s “Resolution.”

20 / 100
M.E.S. Productions

#81. Revenge (2017)

- Director: Coralie Fargeat
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 6.4
- Runtime: 108 minutes

A rape victim turns the tables on her assaulters in this gruesome action flick. France’s answer to grindhouse movies like “I Spit on Your Grave,” it comparatively features much stronger filmmaking. Because the aggressors are wealthy men as opposed to backwoods types, the underlying themes also take on far more resonance.

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21 / 100
Filmsonor

#80. Diabolique (1955)

- Director: Henri-Georges Clouzot
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: data not available
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 117 minutes

A twisty tour de force, this French thriller chronicles the murder of a sadistic school principal. His wife and mistress think they’ve pulled off the perfect crime, until the body goes missing. Viewers are advised to go straight to the source and skip the 1996 American remake.

22 / 100
Blue Haze Entertainment

#79. The Skin I Live In (2011)

- Director: Pedro Almodóvar
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 70
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 120 minutes

Interweaving melodrama and body horror, Pedro Almodóvar tells the story of a brilliant plastic surgeon (Antonio Banderas) and his mysterious subject. While based on a 1984 novel, the film also culls inspiration from the 1960 French classic “Eyes Without a Face.” A series of revealing flashbacks and bizarre exchanges builds up to a final, shocking twist.

23 / 100
Universal Pictures

#78. Dracula (1931)

- Directors: Tod Browning, Karl Freund
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 75 minutes

Horror doesn’t get much more classic than 1931’s “Dracula,” which marks Bela Lugosi’s first appearance as the world famous vampire. Directed by cult legend Tod Browning (who would helm “Freaks” the next year), the movie is rife with atmosphere and memorable performances. To help ensure as much, Bela Lugosi doesn’t blink once while on screen.

24 / 100
Renaissance Pictures

#77. The Evil Dead (1981)

- Director: Sam Raimi
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 85 minutes

Perhaps the quintessential “cabin horror” movie, Sam Raimi’s “The Evil Dead” bears all the hallmarks of a cult classic. Expect bold cinematography, hilarious dialogue, and buckets of blood and gore. Made on a shoestring budget of $350,000, the zany flick would go on to spawn two sequels, a remake, and a TV series.

25 / 100
Harvest Filmworks

#76. Pi (1998)

- Director: Darren Aronofsky
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 84 minutes

Director Darren Aronofsky’s feature debut centers on a brilliant mathematician, who thinks he may have uncovered the secret to...well...everything. While not horror per se, the film renders far graver an impression than most standard genre fare. As it turns out, math can be quite scary.

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26 / 100
F/M

#75. Near Dark (1987)

- Director: Kathryn Bigelow
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 94 minutes

Kathryn Bigelow’s second full-length feature tracks a group of roaming vampires through small-town America. The film eschews traditional genre tropes to reimagine and even modernize vampire mythology. A box office disappointment upon its initial release, it has since earned a loyal cult following.

27 / 100
Lorimar Film Entertainment

#74. The Witches (1990)

- Director: Nicolas Roeg
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 91 minutes

One of Roald Dahl’s many scrumdiddlyumptious stories bursts to life with this 1990 adaptation. Anjelica Huston plays a high witch with plans to eliminate all the children in England. The only thing standing in her way is a young boy turned mouse and his fearless grandma. While not really horror, the film strikes a bone-chilling chord among younger viewers.

28 / 100
SpectreVision

#73. Mandy (2018)

- Director: Panos Cosmatos
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Runtime: 121 minutes

Nicolas Cage is unhinged in this psychedelic horrorshow, and that’s just one reason to see it. Playing a woodsy type named Red Miller, he enacts brutal revenge upon the cultish hippies that murdered his girlfriend. From the oversaturated color scheme to the graphic violence to the outrageous characters, director Panos Cosmatos indulges every whim.

29 / 100
Haxan Films

#72. The Blair Witch Project (1999)

- Directors: Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez
- Stacker score: 80
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Runtime: 81 minutes

An entire subgenre of found footage horror can trace its roots to this low-budget blockbuster from 1999. Shot for just $60,000, it made over $248 million at the worldwide box office. Journey deep into the woods with three ambitious documentarians, none of whom were ever heard from again.

30 / 100
DEG

#71. Manhunter (1986)

- Director: Michael Mann
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 120 minutes

Dr. Hannibal Lecter (spelled Lektor in this version and played by Brian Cox) made his big screen debut in this 1986 adaptation. In the film, an intuitive cop (William Petersen) must catch a serial killer before he strikes again. David Lynch was originally attached as director and his notes about Lecter were reportedly used by later filmmakers.

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31 / 100
Paramount Pictures

#70. Annihilation (2018)

- Director: Alex Garland
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 115 minutes

Director Alex Garland followed the cult smash “Ex Machina” with this heady sci-fi thriller. It sends an expedition team deep into an alien zone called the “Shimmer,” where anything is possible. One might call it a Hollywood update to Tarkovsky films like “Stalker” and “Solaris,” but with far more CGI monsters.

32 / 100
Decla-Bioscop AG

#69. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

- Director: Robert Wiene
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: data not available
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 67 minutes

This quintessential slice of German expressionism cast a wide shadow over subsequent decades of filmmaking. Set against a surrealist backdrop, it tells the story of a crazed hypnotist and his somnambulist companion. According to Roger Ebert, “A case can be made that ‘Caligari’ was the first true horror film.”

33 / 100
Next Entertainment World

#68. Train to Busan (2016)

- Director: Yeon Sang-ho
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 118 minutes

One of South Korea’s biggest blockbusters injects new life into the zombie subgenre. As a train journeys from Seoul to Busan, passengers square off against the walking dead. What takes the form of a high-grade horror film also delivers tangible commentary on South Korea’s complex social hierarchy.

34 / 100
Esta Vivo! Laboratorio de Nuevos Talentos

#67. The Orphanage (2007)

- Director: J.A. Bayona
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 105 minutes

The debut feature from Spanish director J. A. Bayona deals with ghosts of both the literal and figurative variety. Upon returning to an orphanage after 30 years, a woman encounters supernatural entities. Dripping with atmosphere, the film earns genuine scares without resorting to gore or computer gimmickry.

35 / 100
Paramount Pictures

#66. 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016)

- Director: Dan Trachtenberg
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Runtime: 103 minutes

“10 Cloverfield Lane” was shrouded in secrecy upon its initial release. The story seemed to be about a man (John Goodman) who holds a woman (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) captive in his underground bunker. However, the name itself was clearly associated with the 2008 found footage monster movie “Cloverfield.” Is it all connected somehow? Watch to find out.

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36 / 100
Universal Pictures

#65. Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008)

- Director: Guillermo del Toro
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 120 minutes

While 2004’s “Hellboy” wasn’t exactly a blockbuster, it generated enough of a following to warrant a sequel. Armed with a bigger budget, director Guillermo del Toro cranks up every dial. This time around, the brutish superhero (played by Ron Perlman) takes on a powerful prince.

37 / 100
Fox Atomic

#64. 28 Weeks Later (2007)

- Director: Juan Carlos Fresnadillo
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 100 minutes

A different beast than its breakout predecessor, this gripping sequel serves up its own bag of tricks. Set six months after the Rage Virus was first unleashed, it sees the zombie-like infection spreading once again. Overzealous containment efforts by the military resonate with a satirical edge.

38 / 100
Ulrich Seidl Film Produktion GmbH

#63. Goodnight Mommy (2014)

- Directors: Severin Fiala, Veronika Franz
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 6.7
- Runtime: 99 minutes

A mother returns home after cosmetic surgery in this slow burn of a psychological thriller. Convinced that she’s been replaced by someone else, her two sons set about trying to prove it. Viewer patience will be rewarded with an unexpected twist ending.

39 / 100
Universal Pictures

#62. Drag Me to Hell (2009)

- Director: Sam Raimi
- Stacker score: 81
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Runtime: 99 minutes

Fresh off the “Spider-Man” franchise, director Sam Raimi returned to his hypervisualized horror roots. Co-writing the script with brother Ivan, he churned out this crafty take on a witch’s curse. Loan officer Christine Brown (Alison Lohman) has just a few days to reverse the spell, lest she get dragged into the underworld.

40 / 100
DNA Films

#61. 28 Days Later... (2002)

- Director: Danny Boyle
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 73
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 113 minutes

This 2002 zombie film infused the popular subgenre with some much-needed style and distinction. Auteur Danny Boyle enjoyed newfound freedom by way of digital technology, giving the film itself a discernibly kinetic feel. In fact, this was one of the first mainstream films to be shot entirely using digital cameras.

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41 / 100
Argyle Enterprises

#60. The Haunting (1963)

- Director: Robert Wise
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 112 minutes

The premise sounds familiar enough: a scientist asks two women to spend the night in a haunted mansion. Handling that premise with particular aptitude, this 1963 film offers a genuine thrill ride and some truly terrific performances. Director Martin Scorsese once called it his favorite horror movie of all time.

42 / 100
Solofilm

#59. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

- Director: Philip Kaufman
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 115 minutes

Horror movies are particularly effective when you never know exactly where the threat is coming from. So it goes in the 1978 version of “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” where aliens replace human beings from the inside out. Starring Donald Sutherland, it has a final scene that will stick for days.

43 / 100
Broad Green Pictures

#58. Green Room (2015)

- Director: Jeremy Saulnier
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 95 minutes

A touring punk band books the gig from hell in this taut thriller from Jeremy Saulnier. As if the raging crowd of neo-Nazis weren’t bad enough, the band witnesses a murder in the green room. Patrick Stewart plays against type as a ruthless gang leader.

44 / 100
Warner Bros.

#57. The Shining (1980)

- Director: Stanley Kubrick
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 66
- IMDb user rating: 8.4
- Runtime: 146 minutes

Few horror movies have been pored over with the same amount of obsession as Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining.” Interpretations aside, it remains an iconic work about a hotel caretaker (Jack Nicholson) turned homicidal maniac. Author Stephen King—who wrote the book upon which the film is based—is still not much of a fan.

45 / 100
Dawn Associates

#56. Dawn of the Dead (1978)

- Director: George A. Romero
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 71
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 127 minutes

In the midst of a zombie outbreak, survivors shack up inside an abandoned mall. Arguably the most popular of all Romero’s zombie films (and perhaps all his films, period), the horror flick goes so big on gore that the MPAA wanted to slap it with an “X” rating. Zack Snyder’s 2004 remake is likewise held in high regard.

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46 / 100
Renaissance Pictures

#55. Evil Dead II (1987)

- Director: Sam Raimi
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 72
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 84 minutes

Sam Raimi was back with a bigger budget for this delirious sequel, pitting Bruce Campbell against evil demons once again. As for that bigger budget, Raimi had Stephen King to thank for it. The horror novelist was such a big fan of the original that he helped secure financing for the sequel.

47 / 100
Cruise/Wagner Productions

#54. The Others (2001)

- Director: Alejandro Amenábar
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 74
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 104 minutes

It’s hard to discuss this supernatural horror film without bringing up its jaw-dropping ending. All we can say is that it’s a haunted house premise with an unexpected twist. Nicole Kidman stars.

48 / 100
Overture Films

#53. Let Me In (2010)

- Director: Matt Reeves
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 116 minutes

Like its Swedish predecessor, this atypical vampire movie balances coming-of-age drama with brutal violence. At its heart are two young romantic outcasts, one of whom has a thirst for blood. Both this remake and the Swedish original are based on a 2004 novel.

49 / 100
Maljack Productions

#52. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986)

- Director: John McNaughton
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 83 minutes

This shocking biopic is loosely based on the real-life story of serial killer Henry Lee Lucas (played by Michael Rooker). Director John McNaughton follows Lucas and a cohort through a series of heinous crimes. As a realistic counterpunch to the standard slasher flick, it delivers an entirely different set of scares.

50 / 100
Monkeypaw Productions

#51. Us (2019)

- Director: Jordan Peele
- Stacker score: 82
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 116 minutes

With his sophomore effort, director Jordan Peele once again demonstrates his unique ability to layer entertainment with allegory. Lurking just beyond the story of deadly doppelgangers is a grim commentary on the sins of America’s buried past. Domestic audiences aren’t just viewers; they’re participants.

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51 / 100
New Line Cinema

#50. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

- Director: Wes Craven
- Stacker score: 83
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 91 minutes

Robert Englund stars as razor-clawed menace Freddy Krueger, who murders teenagers in their dreams. The film’s box office success brought New Line Cinema back from the brink of bankruptcy, hence their nickname as “The House That Freddy Built”. The classic flick also marks the big screen debut of a young Johnny Depp.

52 / 100
Petit Film

#49. Raw (2016)

- Director: Julia Ducournau
- Stacker score: 83
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 99 minutes

This acclaimed French horror film puts a grisly twist on the standard coming-of-age drama. It tells the story of a devout vegetarian (Garance Marillier) who goes full cannibal after developing a taste for meat. Director Julia Ducournau packs in plenty of metaphor and relatability, purposefully channeling the monster in us all.

53 / 100
The Geffen Company

#48. Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

- Director: Frank Oz
- Stacker score: 83
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 94 minutes

What was first a Roger Corman B-movie and then an off-Broadway play became this iconic musical horror comedy. Rick Moranis plays a lonely florist named Seymour, who discovers an alien plant with a thirst for blood. Come for the catchy songs and stay for Steve Martin’s performance as a crazed dentist.

54 / 100
Say Ahh Productions

#47. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

- Director: Ana Lily Amirpour
- Stacker score: 83
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 7.0
- Runtime: 101 minutes

Director Ana Lily Amirpour used the power of crowdfunding to help finance “the first Iranian vampire Western.” A full-length version of her previous short film, it trails a somber vampire through the desolate ghost town of Bad City. Eschewing most subgenre tropes, the movie plays more like a stylish indie drama.

55 / 100
Northern Lights Films

#46. It Follows (2014)

- Director: David Robert Mitchell
- Stacker score: 83
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 100 minutes

As any horror expert or enthusiast can attest, two teenagers having sex almost always portends death. “It Follows” takes the concept to an extreme, using sex itself as the gateway to a vicious curse. The result is a nightmarish film enhanced by a synth-based soundtrack and an intentional retro vibe.

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56 / 100
Dimension Films

#45. Grindhouse (2007)

- Directors: Robert Rodriguez, Eli Roth, Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright, Rob Zombie
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 77
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 191 minutes

Filmmakers Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez offer their own take on the grindhouse tradition in this indulgent double-header. The first film deals with a zombie invasion and the second one pits no-nonsense women against a deranged stuntman. Delightfully sandwiched between them is a series of mock previews, each one helmed by a famous director.

57 / 100
El Deseo

#44. The Devil's Backbone (2001)

- Director: Guillermo del Toro
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 106 minutes

Guillermo del Toro’s second full-length feature provides an early glimpse of his singular talent. Set in the wake of the Spanish Civil War, it follows a young boy to a haunted orphanage. As with del Toro’s most acclaimed works, this one weaves a deft tapestry of history and horror.

58 / 100
RPC

#43. Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

- Director: Jim Jarmusch
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 123 minutes

Arthouse director Jim Jarmusch tackles the vampire subgenre in this romantic horror film. The centuries-long relationship of two vampires (Tilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston) is thrown into chaos with the arrival of a younger sibling. True to the director’s style, the action moves gradually and dialogue dominates.

59 / 100
MGM

#42. Poltergeist (1982)

- Director: Tobe Hooper
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 114 minutes

It’s still not clear as to whether Tobe Hooper or Steven Spielberg directed the bulk of “Poltergeist,” which puts a suburban twist on the haunted house premise. But that remains a lightweight mystery compared to other legends surrounding the film. Stars JoBeth Williams and Zelda Rubinstein both claimed to have supernatural experiences during filming. Then there’s the fact that several actors from the franchise have died untimely deaths. Thankfully, the movie’s curse doesn’t extend to viewers...or does it?

60 / 100
Parts and Labor

#41. The Witch (2015)

- Director: Robert Eggers
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Runtime: 92 minutes

This supernatural folk tale announced director Robert Eggers as a major new voice in cinema. Delivered with painstaking authenticity, it takes place on the edge of wilderness in 17th-century New England. As a devout Christian family tries to build a life for itself, they brush up against an unspeakable evil.

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61 / 100
Unison Films

#40. What We Do in the Shadows (2014)

- Directors: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 86 minutes

Modern vampires have all sorts of problems in this 2014 mockumentary (and its TV series follow-up). As if sunlight and garlic weren’t enough, they have rent money, pesky flatmates, and difficult nightclub doormen to contend with. It’s just no world for a bloodsucker these days.

62 / 100
Vortex

#39. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)

- Director: Tobe Hooper
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 83 minutes

Fusing gritty realism with pulpy exploitation, this low-budget horror flick achieves the status of grindhouse masterpiece. While traveling through the heart of Texas, a group of hippies falls prey to a family of sadistic cannibals. As nightmarish the movie may be, it’s not without a twisted comic sensibility.

63 / 100
Seda Spettacoli

#38. Suspiria (1977)

- Director: Dario Argento
- Stacker score: 84
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Widely considered Dario Argento’s finest hour, “Suspiria” takes place at a ballet institute where things are most definitely not what they seem. In addition to gory visuals, the movie also features a terrific soundtrack by Italian prog rock outfit (and frequent Argento collaborators) Goblin. A 2018 remake doesn’t necessarily conjure up the same wicked vibe.

64 / 100
Toho Film (Eiga) Co. Ltd.

#37. Godzilla (1954)

- Director: Ishirô Honda
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 78
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 96 minutes

One of cinema’s longest-running franchises kicked off in 1954 with this seminal work. While bearing the hallmarks of a monster movie, it also grapples with themes of nuclear fallout. Roused from his slumber, Godzilla wreaks havoc with his massive frame and “atomic breath.”

65 / 100
Werner Herzog Filmproduktion

#36. Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

- Director: Werner Herzog
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 107 minutes

Werner Herzog wrote and directed this updated version of a silent-era classic. The German director is no stranger to challenges and the shoot presented more than a few. When gray†bon rats weren’t available for an important scene, he and his crew painted thousands of white rats grey instead. He would later claim that the rats were far more well-behaved than frequent collaborator Klaus Kinski.

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66 / 100
Screen Australia

#35. The Babadook (2014)

- Director: Jennifer Kent
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Runtime: 94 minutes

As horrific events unfold inside their home, a woman and her son think something supernatural is afoot. Or is there? Awash with psychological motifs and nail-biting visuals, “The Babadook” endures as a modern classic.

67 / 100
Universal Pictures

#34. Shaun of the Dead (2004)

- Director: Edgar Wright
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 76
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 99 minutes

A benchmark in horror comedy, “Shaun of the Dead” infuses the zombie subgenre with a slacker’s perspective. Despite its zany tone, the work still delivers plenty of tension and gore. Director George Romero loved the send-up so much that he offered co-creators Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright roles as zombies in his next film.

68 / 100
SLM Production Group

#33. The Fly (1986)

- Director: David Cronenberg
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 79
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 96 minutes

A scientist (Jeff Goldblum) becomes the subject of his own experiment in this modern classic. Director David Cronenberg uses the story as an ideal platform for his ongoing fixations, namely science fiction and body horror. The film won a much-deserved Oscar for Best Makeup.

69 / 100
20th Century Fox

#32. The Wailing (2016)

- Director: Na Hong-jin
- Stacker score: 85
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 156 minutes

A stranger rolls into a small village and so too does a mysterious disease. When a detective’s daughter gets infected, he’s in a race against the clock to save her. As with the best South Korean horror films, this one retains an air of absolute unpredictability.

70 / 100
The Associates & Aldrich Company

#31. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962)

- Director: Robert Aldrich
- Stacker score: 86
- Metascore: 75
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Runtime: 134 minutes

“What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” featured as much tension behind the scenes as it did on camera. As chronicled in the FX series “Feud,” stars Bette Davis and Joan Crawford weren’t seeing eye to eye during production. That real-life drama fueled on-screen tension in this fraught tale, about a former child star who torments her paraplegic sister.

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71 / 100
Dreamworks Pictures

#30. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007)

- Director: Tim Burton
- Stacker score: 86
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 116 minutes

Director Tim Burton teamed up with actor Johnny Depp yet again for this adaptation of a Broadway musical. It tells the story of a widowed barber who enacts revenge with the help of a meat pie shop owner (Helena Bonham Carter). He kills the customers. She cooks them. It’s quite a partnership indeed.

72 / 100
Chungeorahm Film

#29. The Host (2006)

- Director: Bong Joon-ho
- Stacker score: 86
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Runtime: 120 minutes

Acclaimed director Bong Joon-ho turned the world on to South Korean monster movies with this 2006 film. When a vicious sea creature captures a girl, her family sets out to save her. The story might be fictional, but it’s inspired by an actual event where a U.S. military civilian employee dumped formaldehyde into Korea’s sewer system.

73 / 100
Paramount Pictures

#28. A Quiet Place (2018)

- Director: John Krasinski
- Stacker score: 86
- Metascore: 82
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 90 minutes

The planet has been invaded by aliens with supersonic hearing in this surprise smash hit. Confined to a remote farm, a family must remain completely quiet at all times if they want to survive. That’s when the pregnant wife (Emily Blunt) goes into labor...

74 / 100
A24

#27. The Lighthouse (2019)

- Director: Robert Eggers
- Stacker score: 87
- Metascore: 83
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 109 minutes

Director Robert Eggers once again transports viewers back in time, setting his tale off the coast of New England in the late 19th century. Bound to seclusion by duty, two lighthouse keepers (Willem Dafoe, Robert Pattinson) square off in a brute-like fashion. Madness slowly descends through a series of vivid hallucinations.

75 / 100
MGM

#26. Freaks (1932)

- Director: Tod Browning
- Stacker score: 87
- Metascore: 80
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 64 minutes

An essential work for cinephiles and cult buffs alike, this 1932 film goes behind the scenes at a carnival freak show. Employing real “freaks,” director Tod Browning offers an uncompromising glimpse into their world. The studios cut out nearly 30 minutes of original footage after early viewers turned squeamish, and that footage is supposedly gone forever.

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76 / 100
Hydraulx

#25. Take Shelter (2011)

- Director: Jeff Nichols
- Stacker score: 87
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 120 minutes

A father’s apocalyptic visions threaten to tear apart his family in this horror drama. Is the man (Michael Shannon) losing his mind or is he bearing witness to an upcoming catastrophe? The film won three awards at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including the Critics Week Grand Prize and the FIPRESCI Prize.

77 / 100
Red Bank Films

#24. Carrie (1976)

- Director: Brian De Palma
- Stacker score: 87
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 98 minutes

Stephen King’s debut novel makes for one heck of a shocking ride in this 1976 horror saga. It centers on an abused and confused teenager (Sissy Spacek), who slowly cultivates deadly powers. The story builds toward an infamous prom scene, which took two weeks out of a 50-day shoot to film.

78 / 100
Morgan Creek Entertainment

#23. Dead Ringers (1988)

- Director: David Cronenberg
- Stacker score: 87
- Metascore: 86
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 116 minutes

Jeremy Irons plays a pair of identical twin gynecologists in this off-beat thriller from David Cronenberg. When a woman comes between them, it sends one of the brothers into a graphic downward spiral. The film is loosely based on the real-life story of twin brothers Stewart and Cyril Marcus.

79 / 100
PalmStar Media

#22. Hereditary (2018)

- Director: Ari Aster
- Stacker score: 88
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Runtime: 127 minutes

Part domestic drama and part gothic horror story, Ari Aster’s debut covers an impressive amount of ground. While coping with the loss of her mother, a woman (Toni Collette) and her family come up against a sinister force. The plot risks spreading itself thin if not for Colette’s knockout performance, which provides a central force of cohesion.

80 / 100
Warner Bros.

#21. The Exorcist (1973)

- Director: William Friedkin
- Stacker score: 88
- Metascore: 81
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 122 minutes

Behold the influential story of a demon-possessed girl (Linda Blair), who exhibits all sorts of grotesque behavior. Initial viewers reacted so strongly that many fainted or burst into hysterics right there in the theater. In spite of all the controversy (or perhaps due to it), this remains one of history’s highest-grossing films when adjusted for inflation.

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81 / 100
EFTI

#20. Let the Right One In (2008)

- Director: Tomas Alfredson
- Stacker score: 88
- Metascore: 82
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 114 minutes

Presented against a rich visual backdrop, this Swedish horror film reimagines the vampire subgenre. Director Tomas Alfredson infuses a romantic sensibility as he depicts the blossoming relationship between two young misfits. The dramatic story arch gets punctuated by the occasional bout of vivid gore.

82 / 100
AFI

#19. Eraserhead (1977)

- Director: David Lynch
- Stacker score: 88
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 89 minutes

David Lynch’s feature debut chronicles a quiet, awkward man as he struggles to cope with his mutant baby. Interspersed throughout are surreal detours into a netherworld that only Lynch himself can conjure. A midnight movie sensation, this is avant-garde filmmaking at its finest.

83 / 100
Aardman Animations

#18. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005)

- Directors: Steve Box, Nick Park
- Stacker score: 88
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Runtime: 85 minutes

Calling this British clay-mation film “horror” might be a stretch, but it certainly culls aspects from the genre. A giant mutant rabbit descends upon a small village and terrorizes the gardens therein. Can local pest controllers Wallace and Gromit stop the monster before he ruins the annual vegetable competition?

84 / 100
Universal Pictures

#17. Get Out (2017)

- Director: Jordan Peele
- Stacker score: 89
- Metascore: 85
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 104 minutes

More than just a modern horror movie, “Get Out” satirizes societal conventions with fiendish alacrity. While visiting his white girlfriend’s parents, a young African-American (Daniel Kaluuya) falls into a deadly trap. Thanks to the film’s box office success, Jordan Peele became the first African-American writer and director whose feature debut made over $100 million.

85 / 100
British Lion Film Corporation

#16. The Wicker Man (1973)

- Director: Robin Hardy
- Stacker score: 89
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Runtime: 88 minutes

Frequent attendees at Burning Man might find this 1973 folk horror tale to be vaguely familiar. It takes place in a small Scottish village, where the citizens engage in a pagan ritual with grave implications. While the 1973 version is occasionally referred to as “the Citizen Kane of horror movies,” a 2006 remake starring Nicolas Cage is considered one of the worst films of all time.

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86 / 100
Universal Pictures

#15. The Invisible Man (1933)

- Director: James Whale
- Stacker score: 90
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 71 minutes

Faithful to the H.G. Wells novel (with a few minor exceptions), this 1933 classic gives an ambitious professor the power of invisibility. Unfortunately, going crazy appears to be one of the side effects. While actor Claude Rains is more or less present throughout the entire movie, his face is only visible in the final scene.

87 / 100
Compass International Pictures

#14. Halloween (1978)

- Director: John Carpenter
- Stacker score: 91
- Metascore: 87
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 91 minutes

Even the naysayers would probably agree that modern horror begins with this iconic slasher film. The premise is painstakingly simple: an escaped mental patient returns to his hometown and terrorizes teenagers on Halloween night. Yet along with that premise came a character named Michael Myers, who set the template for many masked murderers to come.

88 / 100
Rizzoli Film

#13. Deep Red (1975)

- Director: Dario Argento
- Stacker score: 91
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Runtime: 127 minutes

A crown jewel of the Italian giallo movement, Argento’s moving nightmare makes deft use of various cinematic techniques. When a psychic is brutally murdered, it sends a pianist on the trail of a serial killer. The blood flows red like paint across a kinetic canvas, while POV shots put the viewer in the killer’s shoes.

89 / 100
Twentieth Century Fox

#12. The Innocents (1961)

- Director: Jack Clayton
- Stacker score: 91
- Metascore: 88
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 100 minutes

This masterwork was once dubbed by famous French auteur (and critic) François Truffaut as the best British film made since Alfred Hitchcock left for America. It centers on a governess and two children, who become convinced the house they’re occupying is haunted. Thanks to striking visuals and a genuinely creepy score, the movie stands head and shoulders above most standard haunted house fare.

90 / 100
Champs-Élysées Productions

#11. Eyes Without a Face (1960)

- Director: Georges Franju
- Stacker score: 92
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 90 minutes

Featuring graphic depictions of surgery, this French horror drama ranks among the most influential films of its time. Hoping to provide his disfigured daughter with a new face, a guilt-ridden surgeon goes to shocking extremes. Director Georges Franju explores the macabre from an oddly enchanting angle.

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91 / 100
Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions

#10. The Birds (1963)

- Director: Alfred Hitchcock
- Stacker score: 92
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 119 minutes

A small seaside town is under siege by killer birds and no one can figure out why. Upon the movie’s release in England, Hitchcock kept the scares coming even after the final credits rolled. That’s when theaters would emit the sound of screeching and flapping birds through loudspeakers as audiences were leaving.

92 / 100
Image Ten

#9. Night of the Living Dead (1968)

- Director: George A. Romero
- Stacker score: 92
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 96 minutes

George Romero’s intense tale of flesh-eating “ghouls” (i.e., proto-zombies) kicked off a new appetite for gore and terror among audiences. Made for just $114,000, it’s considered one of the most successful independent films of all time. Unfortunately for Romero, he was duped out of most of the profits by savvy distributors.

93 / 100
Compton Films

#8. Repulsion (1965)

- Director: Roman Polanski
- Stacker score: 92
- Metascore: 91
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 105 minutes

Roman Polanski’s first English language film is a psycho-sexual triumph of claustrophobic intensity. Catherine Deneuve plays Carol, a repressed woman who drives herself crazy inside an apartment. Look for a cameo from the director, who appears dressed as a woman toward the end.

94 / 100
RKO Radio Pictures

#7. King Kong (1933)

- Directors: Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack
- Stacker score: 93
- Metascore: 90
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Runtime: 100 minutes

Special effects and filming methods might improve, and yet the original “King Kong” still delivers a feat of spectacle. We all know the story about a giant ape who falls in love with an actress and gets hauled back to New York. But did you know they used more than one model for the gorilla, amounting to noticeable differences between “island” Kong and “city” Kong? Or that the premise itself was inspired by a dream one of the directors had?

95 / 100
Universal Pictures

#6. Frankenstein (1931)

- Director: James Whale
- Stacker score: 93
- Metascore: 91
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 70 minutes

It’s alive! It’s alive! “It” being Dr. Frankenstein’s monster (Boris Karloff), who’s been assembled from stolen human parts. Actor Boris Karloff wasn’t listed by name during the opening credits, nor was he invited to the film’s premiere. By the next installment, he was a Hollywood star.

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96 / 100
Walter Wanger Productions

#5. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

- Director: Don Siegel
- Stacker score: 93
- Metascore: 92
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Runtime: 80 minutes

Aliens have landed and taken over human bodies, but no one seems the wiser. A small-town doctor (Kevin McCarthy) clues into the conspiracy as it unfolds before his very eyes. Rife with socio-political undertones—which may or may not have been intended—this sci-fi thriller sparked a seemingly endless number of imitators.

97 / 100
Brandywine Productions

#4. Alien (1979)

- Director: Ridley Scott
- Stacker score: 95
- Metascore: 89
- IMDb user rating: 8.4
- Runtime: 117 minutes

In space, no one can hear you scream, which proves particularly fatal for the crew on spaceship Nostromo. Ridley Scott’s breakout smash remains a milestone in horror cinema. That’s partly thanks to artist H.R. Giger’s visionary alien concept and Sigourney Weaver’s legendary turn as Ripley. When making the film, Scott took inspiration from three essential sources: “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Star Wars,” and “The Texas Chain Saw Massacre.” That explains everything.

98 / 100
Universal Pictures

#3. Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

- Director: James Whale
- Stacker score: 95
- Metascore: 95
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Runtime: 75 minutes

One of the world’s foremost monsters gets a love interest in this seminal sequel. She comes to life by way of two skeletons and the heart of a living girl. Boris Karloff stars as Frankenstein’s monster, though by this point in his career he was so widely known that he was credited simply as “Karloff.”

99 / 100
William Castle Productions

#2. Rosemary's Baby (1968)

- Director: Roman Polanski
- Stacker score: 97
- Metascore: 96
- IMDb user rating: 8.0
- Runtime: 137 minutes

Along with a spine-tingling score came this equally scary movie, in which a woman gets impregnated by the devil. Among the film’s bevy of memorable scenes is one where lead actress Mia Farrow walks through traffic while pregnant. According to legend, that scene wasn’t scripted and the traffic was real, with director Roman Polanski telling the actress that “nobody will hit a pregnant woman.”

100 / 100
Shamley Productions

#1. Psycho (1960)

- Director: Alfred Hitchcock
- Stacker score: 100
- Metascore: 97
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Runtime: 109 minutes

Alfred Hitchcock was already the “master of suspense” by the time “Psycho” was released, and yet his ability to induce terror took on a new dimension. A secretary turned thief (Janet Leigh) flees town and shacks up at the Bates Motel. When she crosses paths with the motel’s twisted owner, the plot shifts and so too does film history.

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