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100 movies that became TV shows

100 movies that became TV shows

When a beloved movie ends, it can be hard not to desire a little more time with the film’s world and characters. As television became more and more common in the mid-20th century, making ongoing TV adaptations of popular and cult classic cinema became a viable, potentially lucrative opportunity to provide the public with just that—whether they told the same story as their respective movies, served as sequels, or even animated reimaginings.

Although many of these series featured entirely different casts and struggled to survive past their first seasons on respective TV networks, there are many notable exceptions. “Friday Night Lights” and “Dukes of Hazzard” managed to capture the success that made their source material work, leading to acclaim and high ratings. Some television adaptations, such as The WB’s “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Stargate SG-1,” ran for several seasons and arguably became even more acclaimed and influential than their predecessors.

In the current era of streaming, platforms like HBO and Hulu are also trying their hand at film-to-TV adaptations with high-profile series such as “Westworld” and “High Fidelity.” With much of the population still largely confined to its homes, now is a great time to dive into some series that were based on favorite films. But when it comes to movies that became shows, which examples should be on viewers’ radar?

Stacker dug into the history of film and TV and chose 100 films that were turned into TV series, representing a swath of different genres and expressions within the media. IMDb and Metacritic data is included for context in regard to critical and popular reception.

From 1933 to 2011, here are 100 movies that later became television shows.

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9 to 5 (1980)

- Director: Colin Higgins
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 58
- Runtime: 109 minutes

Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Dolly Parton star as three working women who realize their dreams of overthrowing their misogynistic, egotistical boss. A TV adaptation of “9 to 5” ran for five seasons—on ABC from 1982 to 1983, and in first-run syndication from 1986 to 1988. The series expands on the lives of the main characters from the film, with Rachel Dennison, Rita Moreno, and Valerie Curtin taking over the principal roles.

Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994)

- Director: Tom Shadyac
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Metascore: 37
- Runtime: 86 minutes

In “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective,” Jim Carrey plays the titular character, a childish animal detective who sets out to find the abducted dolphin mascot of the Miami Dolphins football team. Although the movie was a critical flop, it gained a cult following among young men and is largely responsible for launching Carrey’s film career. From 1995 until 2000, an animated TV version of “Ace Ventura,” loosely based on the movie, saw its zany lead character, voiced by Michael Daingerfield, solve creature-based cases with an emphasis on toilet humor. The show aired for three seasons.

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)

- Director: Martin Scorsese
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 78
- Runtime: 112 minutes

This 1974 Martin Scorsese dramedy follows Alice, played by Ellen Burstyn, a widow and single mom who heads with her son to Monterrey, California to launch a singing career. Burstyn won Best Actress at the 47th Academy Awards, and the movie inspired the sitcom "Alice," which aired on CBS from 1976 to 1985. In the TV show, Linda Lavin plays Alice, who starts her life over again with her young son—this time in Phoenix. Many of the episodes take place at the diner where Alice works, and Vic Tayback, who played Mel, was the only actor to reprise his role from the film.

Alien Nation (1988)

- Director: Graham Baker
- IMDb user rating: 6.3
- Metascore: 45
- Runtime: 91 minutes

“Alien Nation” imagines a world where an alien race known only as the “Newcomers” assimilate to the local population of Los Angeles, and an extraterrestrial named Sam Francisco, played by Mandy Patinkin, becomes the first Newcomer police detective. Sam teams up with veteran policeman Matthew, played by James Caan, to investigate a recent homicide. A short-lived “Alien Nation” TV show aired on Fox Network from 1989 to 1990, with a 22-episode first season—this time, Gary Grahamas played Matthew, while Eric Pierpoint portrayed Sam.

An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1991)

- Directors: Phil Nibbelink, Simon Wells
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 75 minutes

“An American Tail: Fievel Goes West” tells the story of the Mousekewitzes, a family of Jewish-Ukranian mice who move to the Wild West after hearing utopian claims that mice and cats in the area live together in peace. However, when they get there, they must contend with a con artist cat called Cat R. Waul, who has made the false claim as part of his own worrisome agenda. The movie was created by Steven Spielberg’s Amblimation animation studio, and led to a one-season CBS series continuing Fievel’s everyday misadventures. The series heavily promoted literacy, and episode conflicts were often resolved when young Fievel used his reading skills.

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Army of Darkness (1992)

- Director: Sam Raimi
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 59
- Runtime: 81 minutes

This third installment in the “Evil Dead” franchise centers on cynical hardware store employee Ash, played by Bruce Campbell, who is accidentally sent back in time to A.D. 1300. Ash is then forced to battle the undead as he embarks on a quest to return to the present day. “Army of Darkness” was released as a TV show—“Ash vs. Evil Dead”—21 years later, set within the franchise’s universe, and acted as a sequel to the original trilogy. It aired from 2015 to 2018 on Starz, and saw Campbell reprise his role as Ash.

Baby Boom (1987)

- Director: Charles Shyer
- IMDb user rating: 6.3
- Metascore: 53
- Runtime: 110 minutes

In “Baby Boom,” Diane Keaton plays J.C. Wiatt, a young woman who suddenly inherits custody of her long-lost cousin’s baby after she dies. A show based on the romantic comedy ran on NBC from 1988 to 1989, largely picking up from the events of the original film with new actors, chiefly, Kate Jackson as J.C.

The Bad News Bears (1976)

- Director: Michael Ritchie
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 84
- Runtime: 102 minutes

“The Bad News Bears” follows Morris Buttermaker, played by Walter Matthau, a grizzled ex-minor-league baseball player who agrees to coach a local Little League team. He becomes determined to whip the ragtag group of kids into shape as they take on an ultra-competitive California league. CBS aired a one-season adaptation of the sports comedy from 1979 to 1980, with Jack Warden portraying Morris in this iteration. The series unfolded in a sitcom format, expanding upon the misadventures that the coach and his band of misfits got into on the baseball field.

Bagdad Cafe (1987)

- Director: Percy Adlon
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 71
- Runtime: 95 minutes

Loosely based on Carson McCullers’ novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café,” Bagdad Café focuses on the friendship that grows between two women who have recently separated from their respective husbands. One is Jasmin, played by Marianne Sägebrecht, a German tourist who becomes stranded after fighting with her husband on vacation and wandering to the nearest public setting—an isolated truck stop café. CCH Pounder plays Brenda, the short-tempered owner who eventually warms to Jasmin. The TV version of “Bagdad Café” ran for one season on CBS from 1990 to 1991, starring Whoopi Goldberg and Jean Stapleton as the lead women. In the series, the tourist was American and not German.

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Beetlejuice (1988)

- Director: Tim Burton
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 70
- Runtime: 92 minutes

Tim Burton’s beloved creepy comedy begins as a young couple, played by Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin, die in a car accident, then find themselves stuck haunting their house when a new family moves in. Their attempts to scare the new tenants away attract an obnoxious spirit named Beetlejuice, played by Michael Keaton, who becomes a menace to the homeowners’ sulky teenage daughter, Lydia, played by Winona Ryder. A loose animated TV adaptation ran on ABC from 1989 to 1991, this time making Lydia and Beetlejuice best friends who explore the Neitherworld, a supernatural realm featured in the original movie.

Black Dynamite (2009)

- Director: Scott Sanders
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 65
- Runtime: 84 minutes

“Black Dynamite” parodies and pays homage to 1970s blaxploitation films. It stars Michael Jai White as the titular character, an A-list action star who wages war with President Nixon after “The Man” kills his only brother. An animated TV show of the same name was released on Cartoon Network from 2012 to 2015, as Black Dynamite and his friends engage in over-the-top misadventures in the ’70s. Many celebrities of the time appeared as fictional characters, from Elvis Presley to Spike Lee.

Blade (1998)

- Director: Stephen Norrington
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Metascore: 45
- Runtime: 120 minutes

In this superhero horror film, Blade, played by Wesley Snipes, is a Dhampir, a human with vampire-like strength. He teams up with his mentor Abraham Whistler and hematologist Karen Jenson to avenge his mother’s death and eradicate vampires. The movie garnered a cult following and spawned a short-lived live-action TV adaptation that ran on Spike TV for 12 episodes in 2006. Series writer Geoff Johns told Wizard magazine that “the network didn’t want to cancel it, I just think Spike TV is still a young network, and the price it was costing to make … they just weren’t able to do it.”

Blue Thunder (1983)

- Director: John Badham
- IMDb user rating: 6.4
- Metascore: 66
- Runtime: 109 minutes

“Blue Thunder” follows Roy Scheider’s character Frank Murphy, a Los Angeles police officer who’s tapped to do a test run of the film’s titular high-tech experimental attack helicopter. After learning that the government plans to use Blue Thunder for unethical surveillance and crowd control, Frank and his colleagues fight to stop their plans. A TV action drama of the same name aired from January until April of 1984, relying heavily on stock footage from the original movie. The show failed to find a viewership, which wasn’t helped by the fact that a similar helicopter show—CBS’ Airwolf—was airing on TV around the same time.

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969)

- Director: Paul Mazursky
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 72
- Runtime: 105 minutes

The infamous comedy “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice” sees four friends attend a risque workshop together. It functioned as a satire of 1960s wife-swapping and illegitimate psychological trends, and received four Oscar nominations. Seven episodes of a TV sitcom adaptation were broadcast in 1973, featuring then-racy plotlines that included things like premarital relations and skinny dipping. Arguably the most memorable element of the series was its casting of a young Jodie Foster as Ted and Alice’s daughter in one of her early roles.

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Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992)

- Director: Fran Rubel Kuzui
- IMDb user rating: 5.7
- Metascore: 48
- Runtime: 86 minutes

Before Sarah Michelle Gellar made the role of Buffy Summers an iconic TV one, the character was introduced in a 1992 comedy film. In the movie version of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Buffy, played by Kristy Swanson, learns that it’s her fate to hunt vampires. The film received largely poor reviews—with an approval rating of only 35%—but an acclaimed, darker TV version aired on The WB and UPN from 1997 to 2003. The series’ popularity led to a spin-off show called Angel.

Bustin’ Loose (1981)

- Directors: Oz Scott, Michael Schultz
- IMDb user rating: 6.1
- Metascore: 55
- Runtime: 94 minutes

“Bustin’ Loose” centers on gruff ex-con Joe Braxton, played by Richard Pryor, who begrudgingly agrees to escort a teacher named Vivian, played by Cicely Tyson, and her special education students from Philadelphia to the Pacific Northwest, where Vivian plans to start a new school for them. While the trip hardly goes as planned, Braxton finds himself becoming closely attached to Vivian and her pupils. A sitcom of the same name very loosely based on the 1981 film ran for one season and starred Jimmie Walker as Sonny, a former con artist who is completing five years of community service in a home with a social worker and her four foster children.

Casablanca (1942)

- Director: Michael Curtiz
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Metascore: 100
- Runtime: 102 minutes

In this classic romantic drama, American Rick Blaine, played by Humphrey Bogart, owns a nightclub in Casablanca during World War II. His ex-lover, Ilsa, played by Ingrid Bergman, arrives with her rebel husband, played by Paul Henreid, in hopes that Rick can help get him out of the country before pursuing Germans catch up with them—however, old tensions soon arise. “Casablanca” won Best Picture and is consistently regarded as one of the best movies ever made. Five episodes of a prequel series of the same name were released on NBC in 1983, and followed a young Rick, played by David Soul, at his club.

Clerks (1994)

- Director: Kevin Smith
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Metascore: 70
- Runtime: 92 minutes

“Clerks” recounts a day in the lives of two convenience clerks called Dante, played by Brian O’Halloran, and Randal, played by Jeff Anderson, as they deal with annoying customers, play hockey on the roof, and deal with girl problems. The comedy was the first film in director Kevin Smith’s series of “View Askewniverse” movies, introducing recurring characters like Jay, played by Jason Mewes, and Silent Bob, played by Kevin Smith. “Clerks: The Animated Series,” which continued the workplace adventures of Dante and Randal, aired for only two episodes on ABC before being canceled.

The Client (1994)

- Director: Joel Schumacher
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 65
- Runtime: 119 minutes

Based on John Grisham’s novel of the same name, “The Client” opens as a boy, played by Brad Renfro, accidentally witnesses a mafia lawyer’s suicide. When the district attorney jeopardizes his safety in an attempt to apprehend a local mob family, he hires a lawyer, played by Susan Sarandon, in an Oscar-nominated performance, to protect him from unwanted attention. A legal thriller TV adaptation ran for one season on CBS, with actress JoBeth Williams taking over Sarandon’s role.

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Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs (2009)

- Directors: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Metascore: 66
- Runtime: 90 minutes

Loosely adapted from the 1978 children’s book of the same name, “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatball” follows inventor Flint Lockwood, played by Bill Hader, who develops a machine that can convert water into food. The machine malfunctions and begins to cause food storms, forcing Flint to destroy it before weather-related catastrophes threaten the world. A TV prequel of the same name that explored Flint’s high school years premiered on Cartoon Network in 2017.

Clueless (1995)

- Director: Amy Heckerling
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 68
- Runtime: 97 minutes

In this acclaimed comedy, popular Beverly Hills high schooler Cher, played by Alicia Silverstone, runs into trouble after meddling in the love lives of her teachers and friends. “Clueless” is partially based on Jane Austen’s novel “Emma,” and is regularly hailed as one of the best teen movies of all time. An ABC sitcom based on the film ran from 1996 to 1999, with Rachel Blanchard playing Cher.

Cooley High (1975)

- Director: Michael Schultz
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 72
- Runtime: 107 minutes

“Cooley High” takes place in 1964 Chicago, where four Black high school friends’ comedic, easygoing lives are suddenly altered by unexpected tragedy. The movie has been directly cited as a touchstone for acclaimed directors like Spike Lee and John Singleton. A loose TV adaptation called “What’s Happening!!” ran on CBS from 1976 to 1979 and revolved around the lives of three working-class Black teenagers in Los Angeles.

The Courtship of Eddie’s Father (1963)

- Director: Vincente Minnelli
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 118 minutes

Glenn Ford stars in “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father” as a single father whose son, Eddie, played by Ronny Howard, disapproves of his dating life and decides to set him up with the woman next door. An ABC sitcom inspired by the romantic comedy aired from 1969 to 1972, as Eddie, played by Brandon Cruz, continues to play matchmaker for his father Tom, played by Bill Bixby, who received an Emmy nomination for his performance.

The Crow (1994)

- Director: Alex Proyas
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Metascore: 71
- Runtime: 102 minutes

Based on James O’Barr’s comics series of the same name, “The Crow” follows rock musician Eric Draven, played by Brandon Lee, who was resurrected after he and his fiancée were brutally murdered by a gang the night before their wedding. Now, Eric sets out to avenge his and his lover’s murders, assuming the antihero mantle of The Crow. Lead actor Lee was killed during the film’s final days of shooting after he was accidentally wounded by blank ammunition and died in surgery. The Canadian television adaptation, “The Crow: Stairway to Heaven,” ran for one season and starred Mark Dacascos as Eric.

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Dangerous Minds (1995)

- Director: John N. Smith
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Metascore: 47
- Runtime: 99 minutes

Michelle Pfeiffer plays LouAnne Johnson, a retired U.S. Marine who begins a teaching job at an inner-city school in California and inspires her largely marginalized students. Although “Dangerous Minds” received negative reviews—it currently has a 28% score on Rotten Tomatoes—it was a surprise box office hit and sparked an ABC TV series of the same name that aired for one season from 1996 to 1997 with Lou Anne Johnson in the lead role.

The Dead Zone (1983)

- Director: David Cronenberg
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 69
- Runtime: 103 minutes

In this 1983 Stephen King adaptation, a man named Johnny Smith, played by Christopher Walken, wakes up from a long-term coma with newfound psychic abilities that give him the ability to see a person’s future by touching them. One day, when Johnny shakes the hand of political candidate Greg Stillson, played by Martin Sheen, he has a vision of Greg becoming a president who causes the nuclear holocaust and vows to kill him. A successful TV version of “The Dead Zone” starring Anthony Michael Hall ran 17 years later, from 2002 to 2007, on the USA Network.

Dirty Dancing (1987)

- Director: Emile Ardolino
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: 65
- Runtime: 100 minutes

Dirty Dancing follows Frances “Baby” Houseman, played by Jennifer Grey, a restless young woman who falls in love with charismatic dance instructor Johnny, played by Patrick Swayze, at a vacation resort. The film’s signature song, “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life,” won a Golden Globe, Grammy Award, and Academy Award. A TV version of the film aired on ABC for a single 11-episode first season from 1988 to 1989, with Melora Hardin as Baby and Patrick Cassidy as Johnny.

Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986)

- Director: Paul Mazursky
- IMDb user rating: 6.2
- Metascore: 82
- Runtime: 103 minutes

“Down and Out in Beverly Hills” revolves around the Whitemans, a wealthy yet troubled family whose lives are shaken when they take in a suicidal homeless man played by Nick Nolte, . The movie was the first Disney film to receive an R rating from the Motion Picture Association of America. A sitcom based on the movie aired in spring of 1987, and was the first TV show to ever be canceled by the then-recently founded Fox Network. Only Evan Richards, who played the Whitemans’ teenage son, Max, reprised his role on the show.

Dumb and Dumber (1994)

- Directors: Peter Farrelly, Bobby Farrelly
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 41
- Runtime: 107 minutes

In “Dumb and Dumber,” moronic best friends Lloyd, played by Jim Carrey, and Harry, played by Jeff Daniels, discover and attempt to return a suitcase of money to Lauren Holly’s character Mary, a woman who actually left it behind as ransom money. As a result, the men are unknowingly pursued by police and hitmen. The movie’s box office success launched the Farrelly brothers’ career, with Peter Farrelly’s 2018 film “Green Book” eventually winning Best Picture. An animated “Dumb and Dumber” series ran on ABC for one season and focused on the friends’ continuing adventures. Kitty, a pet beaver who is smarter than both friends, was introduced as a new central character.

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The Emperor’s New Groove (2000)

- Director: Mark Dindal
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 70
- Runtime: 78 minutes

After “The Emperor’s New Groove” protagonist Kuzco (David Spade as an arrogant Incan emperor) is transformed into a llama by his conniving ex-advisor, Yzma, played by Eartha Kitt, his only chance to get home and become human again is a kindly peasant named Pacha, played by John Goodman. An animated spin-off called “The Emperor’s New School” aired on Disney Channel from 2006 to 2008, and centered on Kuzco as he attends Kuzco Academy in order to become emperor.

The Exorcist (1973)

- Director: William Friedkin
- IMDb user rating: 8
- Metascore: 81
- Runtime: 122 minutes

Loosely based on actual events, this groundbreaking horror movie sees two priests, played by Jason Miller and Max von Sydow, attempt to help a girl, played by Linda Blair, who seems to be possessed by the devil. “The Exorcist” received 10 Academy Award nominations, and became the first horror movie to ever be nominated for Best Picture. From 2016 to 2018, a Fox TV series of the same name served as a direct sequel to the original film. It starred Ben Daniels and Alfonso Herrera as exorcists who looked into cases of demonic possession.

F/X (1986)

- Director: Robert Mandel
- IMDb user rating: 6.7
- Metascore: 71
- Runtime: 109 minutes

In “F/X,” the FBI hires Hollywood special effects expert Rollie Tyler, played by Bryan Brown, to stage the murder of a gangster who is preparing to enter into witness protection. Soon, New York policeman Leo McCarthy, played by Brian Dennehy, begins to get suspicious when investigating the event. “FX: The Series” ran on CTV from 1996 to 1998, this time focusing on a special effects man, played by Cameron Daddo, who helps the NYPD catch criminals.

Fame (1980)

- Director: Alan Parker
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: 58
- Runtime: 134 minutes

“Fame” follows the melodramatic lives of several young students at the prestigious New York High School of Performing Arts. The movie became the first to have two original songs nominated for Academy Awards, with “Fame” and “Out Here on My Own,” with the song “Fame” going on to win. A TV spin-off of “Fame” ran on NBC from 1982 to 1983 for two seasons, and its success led to the formation of a real-life music group called The Kids From Fame.

Fargo (1996)

- Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Metascore: 85
- Runtime: 98 minutes

Lead actress Frances McDormand won an Academy Award for her role in “Fargo,” in which she played a pregnant policewoman investigating roadside homicides that are the result of a car salesman, played by William H. Macy, desperately hiring petty criminals, played by Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare, to kidnap his wife. The movie also won the Academy Award for best original screenplay, cementing the brothers Joel Coen and Ethan Coen as celebrated contemporary American auteurs. It was reimagined as a black comedy crime anthology series that has aired on FX since 2014, with each season set in a different era.

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Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982)

- Director: Amy Heckerling
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 61
- Runtime: 90 minutes

“Fast Times at Ridgemont High” recounts a school year in the lives of four teenagers: Stacy, played by Jennifer Jason Leigh; Mark, played by Brian Backer; Linda, played by Phoebe Cates; and Mike, played by Robert Romanus. Things become more complicated when naive Stacy finds herself in a love triangle with Mark and Mike as the year goes on. The film also includes early performances by well-known actors like Nicolas Cage, Anthony Edwards, and Forest Whitaker. A short-lived TV show simply called “Fast Times” aired on CBS in 1986, although the four main characters were played by new actors.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

- Director: John Hughes
- IMDb user rating: 7.8
- Metascore: 61
- Runtime: 103 minutes

John Hughes’ classic teen comedy stars Matthew Broderick as Ferris Bueller, a Chicago teenage slacker with an uncanny ability to skip school and not get caught. One day, Ferris fakes being sick so that he can spend one last carefree day with his best friend, Cameron, played by Alan Ruck, and girlfriend, Sloane, played by Mia Sara. A one-season prequel series called “Ferris Bueller” ran for 13 episodes on NBC, featuring future “Friends” star Jennifer Anniston as Ferris’ sister, Jeanie.

The Firm (1993)

- Director: Sydney Pollack
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 58
- Runtime: 154 minutes

Tom Cruise stars in “The Firm” as Mitch, a young lawyer who joins a prestigious firm only to learn that the company is dangerously in league with the mob. The film was based on John Grisham’s 1991 novel of the same name, and actress Holly Hunter received an Oscar nomination for her supporting performance as a secretary named Tamara. In 2011, a TV sequel followed Mitch, now played by Josh Lucas, and his family 10 years after the events of the movie.

Foul Play (1978)

- Director: Colin Higgins
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 45
- Runtime: 116 minutes

In “Foul Play,” Goldie Hawn plays recently divorced librarian Gloria, whose humdrum life is thrown into chaos when she accidentally becomes aware of an assassination plot against the pope. She calls the police for help and eventually falls in love with a detective named Tony, played by Chevy Chase, all while an assassin, played by Marc Lawrence, tries to kill her to keep her from screwing up the scheme. A TV adaptation, also called “Foul Play” and starring Deborah Raffin, aired on ABC in spring of 1981, but was canceled after six episodes.

The Four Seasons (1981)

- Director: Alan Alda
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Metascore: 55
- Runtime: 107 minutes

“The Four Seasons” centers on three middle-aged couples who take vacations together every season of the year. However, things change when one of the men, Nick, played by Len Cariou, suddenly brings his younger new girlfriend, played by Bess Armstrong, along instead. The film’s title also refers to a Vivaldi concerti, which was present in the score. A short-lived CBS series of the same name was based on “The Four Seasons” and aired in 1984.

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Freebie and the Bean (1974)

- Director: Richard Rush
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 113 minutes

Trouble ensues when Alan Arkin and James Caan, two eccentric San Francisco policemen, learn that someone has put out a hit on the crime boss they’re trying to arrest. A one-season “Freebie and the Bean” TV adaptation was broadcast on CBS from 1980 to 1981, and starred Tom Mason and Héctor Elizondo as the two cops.

Friday (1995)

- Director: F. Gary Gray
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 54
- Runtime: 91 minutes

In the stoner comedy “Friday,” Craig Jones, played by Ice Cube, and his best friend, Smokey, played by Chris Jones, get into everyday misadventures as they scramble to pay a local drug dealer to whom Smokey owes money. Co-screenwriters Ice Cube and DJ Pooh have said that they wrote the film to combat negative, stereotypical portrayals of “the hood” with more positive comedy. Following the movie’s success, “Friday: The Animated Series” aired for eight episodes and continued Craig and Smokey’s adventures. None of the actors reprised their original roles.

Friday Night Lights (2004)

- Director: Peter Berg
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 70
- Runtime: 118 minutes

The sports drama “Friday Night Lights” centers on the coach and football players of a small-town Texas football team, and was adapted from H.G. Bissinger’s 1990 book “Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream.” A TV show of the same name aired for five seasons from 2006 to 2011, and followed high school football coach Eric Taylor, played by Kyle Chandler, and his wife, Tami Taylor, played by Connie Britton. The series received multiple Emmy nods, including an Outstanding Drama Series nomination in 2011.

From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)

- Director: Robert Rodriguez
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 48
- Runtime: 108 minutes

From “Dusk Till Dawn” stars George Clooney and Quentin Tarantino as criminal brothers whose plans to break free in Mexico are put on pause when they unknowingly enter a truck stop filled with vampires. The movie became a box office and cult success, and led to a two-season TV show inspired by it that ran from 2014 to 2016 on the El Rey television network. In this iteration, D.J. Cotrona and Zane Holtz played the brothers.

Godzilla (1998)

- Director: Roland Emmerich
- IMDb user rating: 5.4
- Metascore: 32
- Runtime: 139 minutes

This poorly received reboot of the popular Japanese “Godzilla” franchise begins as the French government accidentally mutates a lizard nest during nuclear tests. The result is the film’s titular giant lizard monster, who grows up and attacks New York. The movie was a critical flop, with only a 15% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Instead of film sequels, an animated sequel series aired on Fox Kids from 1998 to 2000.

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Going My Way (1944)

- Director: Leo McCarey
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 126 minutes

In this best picture-winning musical, Bing Crosby plays a young priest named Charles O’Malley, who revitalizes a Catholic parish in a tough Manhattan neighborhood. To help his new community, he decides to form an all-boys choir. A TV show of the same name was broadcast on ABC for one season from 1962 to 1963, and featured “Singin’ in the Rain” actor Gene Kelly as Father O’Malley.

Gung Ho (1986)

- Director: Ron Howard
- IMDb user rating: 6.3
- Metascore: 48
- Runtime: 111 minutes

“Gung Ho” focuses on the cultural clashes that occur when a Pennsylvania auto plant is acquired by a Japanese company, leaving auto worker Hunt, played by Michael Keaton, to serve as a mediator between the two groups. Although the movie received largely negative reviews, it inspired a brief ABC sitcom of the same name that ran from 1986 to 1987. Like the movie, much of the humor was derived from the differences between the Pennsylvanians and their new Japanese manager Gedde Watanabe, who played the role in both versions.

Harry and the Hendersons (1987)

- Director: William Dear
- IMDb user rating: 6
- Metascore: 42
- Runtime: 110 minutes

In “Harry and the Hendersons,” a Seattle family takes in a kind-hearted Sasquatch named Harry, played by Kevin Peter Hall, but begins to fear for his safety when hiding him in suburbia proves to be difficult. The film was inspired by numerous stories of Bigfoot sightings in the Pacific Northwest, and won an Academy Award for best makeup. A sitcom based on it aired in syndication from 1991 to 1993, with Hall reprising his role as Harry until his death later in 1991.

Hercules (1997)

- Directors: Ron Clements, John Musker
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 74
- Runtime: 93 minutes

Disney put its own spin on Greek mythology with the animated feature “Hercules,” in which Zeus and Hera’s son Hercules, voiced by Tate Donovan, is kidnapped as an infant by Hades, voiced by James Woods, and turned into a half-man, half-god who must live among humans until he performs a rite of passage on Earth and earns his place with the gods on Mount Olympus. Disney’s “Hercules: The Animated Series” was broadcast from 1998 to 1999 and focused on Hercules’ life as a teenager at the high school-like Prometheus Academy.

High Fidelity (2000)

- Director: Stephen Frears
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 79
- Runtime: 113 minutes

“High Fidelity” revolves around Rob, played by John Cusack, a Chicago record store owner who recounts his top five breakups after his longtime girlfriend, played by Iben Hjejle, dumps him and his business is failing. In 2019, a reimagined TV adaptation of the movie came to Hulu, with Zoë Kravitz playing Rob. In August 2020, the show was canceled after one season.

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Highlander (1986)

- Director: Russell Mulcahy
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Metascore: 24
- Runtime: 116 minutes

“Highlander” chronicles the end of an ancient war between immortal warriors, and its tagline—“there can only be one”—found an enduring place in pop culture. The movie spawned two TV spin-offs: “Highlander: The Series,” which ran from 1992 to 1998, and “Highlander: The Animated Series,” which aired from 1994 to 1996.

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989)

- Director: Joe Johnston
- IMDb user rating: 6.4
- Metascore: 63
- Runtime: 93 minutes

In “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids,” Rick Moranis plays Wayne Szalinski, an inventor whose experimental shrink ray accidentally turns his and the next door neighbors’ children into miniature versions of themselves. Now less than an inch tall, the kids must contend with giant bugs and sprinkler tidal waves. The movie was a box office hit, becoming the highest-grossing live-action Disney movie ever made at the time. It eventually led to a three-season syndicated TV sitcom called “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show.” The series revolved around Wayne’s other wacky inventions, which often landed the Szalinski family in strange, comedic adventures.

House Calls (1978)

- Director: Howard Zieff
- IMDb user rating: 6.7
- Metascore: 49
- Runtime: 98 minutes

“House Calls” revolves around Walter Maatthau’s character, Dr. Charles Nichols, who struggles to find love as a newly single man. He feels sparks with a hospital patient named Ann, played by Glenda Jackson, but both of them struggle with commitment after losing previous long-term relationships. In 1979, a sitcom version starring Lynn Redgrave, who was later replaced by Ann Atkinson, and Wayne Rogers debuted on CBS. It ran until 1982, but sparked controversy when Redgrave said that she was fired after insisting on breastfeeding her newborn on set.

How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)

- Director: Jean Negulesco
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 95 minutes

In “How to Marry a Millionaire,” three women—Lauren Bacall, Betty Grable, and Marilyn Monroe—move to New York City and seduce wealthy Manhattanites with the goal of marrying a millionaire. By 1957, the movie became a sitcom of the same name on NBC. It was one of the earlier shows based on a movie, and ran in syndication for two seasons.

In the Heat of the Night (1967)

- Director: Norman Jewison
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Metascore: 75
- Runtime: 110 minutes

Sidney Poitier stars in “The Heat of the Night” as Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs, who is sent to investigate a murder in a racially hostile small Mississippi town. The movie went on to win five Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Actor. It was reimagined as an identically named crime drama CBS series, which aired for seven seasons from 1988 to 1995 and featured Howard Rollins as Virgil.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)

- Director: Steven Spielberg
- IMDb user rating: 8.2
- Metascore: 65
- Runtime: 127 minutes

“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” follows its titular hero, played by Harrison Ford, as he rescues Sean Connery, who portrays his father, from Nazis who kidnapped him when he was pursuing the Holy Grail. The movie’s prologue, which showed a young Indiana, inspired the TV show “The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles.” The globe-trotting TV series aired on ABC from 1992 to 1993, featuring Sean Patrick Flanery and Cory Carrier.

The Karate Kid (1984)

- Director: John G. Avildsen
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: 60
- Runtime: 126 minutes

In “The Karate Kid,” an unassuming martial arts master named Mr. Miyagi, played by Noriyuki “Pat” Morita, teaches the art of karate to Daniel, a bullied California teenager, played by Ralph Macchio. The movie launched Macchio’s career, while gaining a reputation as one of the best sports films ever. Its success launched a franchise, including a 1989 animated series of the same name, which aired for one season and saw Miyagi and Daniel fight to return a miniature shrine to its rightful home. More recently, the web series “Cobra Kai” debuted on YouTube and followed the characters 34 years after the events of the movie.

The King and I (1956)

- Director: Walter Lang
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 72
- Runtime: 133 minutes

In “The King and I,” British widow Anna, played by Deborah Kerr, accepts a job in Siam tutoring Yul Brynner’s character, the king, and his several wives and children. Although the two clash based on their different cultures, they become mutually infatuated with each other amid musical numbers. The film was based on Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1951 Broadway musical and acted as a major star vehicle for Brynner, who won Best Actor at the Academy Awards. He reprised the role in the 1972 sitcom “Anna and the King,” which followed the general plot of the film but featured Samantha Eggar as Anna.

King Kong (1933)

- Directors: Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack
- IMDb user rating: 7.9
- Metascore: 90
- Runtime: 100 minutes

The groundbreaking monster movie “King Kong” concerns a huge, ape-like creature called Kong, who wreaks havoc as he covets an alluring young woman named Ann, played by Fay Wray. The film included cutting-edge special effects at the time, utilizing techniques like matte painting, miniatures, and stop-motion animation. Decades later, “Kong: The Animated Series” debuted on BKN and imagined what happened when a young scientist cloned Kong after his death.

La Femme Nikita (1990)

- Director: Luc Besson
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 56
- Runtime: 117 minutes

When Nikita, played by Anne Parillaud, becomes a convicted felon, instead of being sent to jail, she’s given a new identity and trained to be a secret police assassin who the government controls. However, things become more complicated when she falls in love with Marco, played by Jean-Hugues Anglad, a man who knows nothing about her real job. The French film spawned two television adaptations: “La Femme Nikita,” which ran from 1997 to 2001 on the USA Network, and “Nikita,” which aired on the CW from 2010 to 2013.

The Land Before Time (1988)

- Director: Don Bluth
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 66
- Runtime: 69 minutes

A-list filmmakers like Steven Spielberg and George Lucas produced Don Bluth’s animated family drama, “The Land Before Time.” The plot centers on a recently orphaned young dinosaur named Littlefoot, voiced by Gabriel Damon, who teams up with his friends to reach safety in the legendary Great Valley. The movie’s success led to many film sequels and a one-season animated TV show of the same name, which premiered on Cartoon Network in 2007.

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Limitless (2011)

- Director: Neil Burger
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 59
- Runtime: 105 minutes

Recently unemployed writer Eddie, played by Bradley Cooper, seems to hit the lottery when an old friend gives him a drug that enables the user to access 100% of their brain capacities. Eddie soon finds great success in the financial world, but trouble arises when he faces serious side effects as a corrupt mogul, played by Robert De Niro, tries to use him for his abilities. Four years later, a CBS TV drama of the same name acted as a sequel to the film. It starred Jake McDorman as Brian, another man who discovers the drug. The show was canceled after one season.

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)

- Director: Guy Ritchie
- IMDb user rating: 8.2
- Metascore: 66
- Runtime: 107 minutes

In “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels,” four London friends’ get-rich-quick scheme backfires, leaving them scrambling to pay a crime lord more than $600,000 after losing a high-stakes poker game. The movie cemented Guy Ritchie as a major director, and he eventually went on to direct films like “Sherlock Holmes” and the 2019 live-action “Aladdin.” The TV adaptation, “Lock, Stock …” aired for one season in 2000 on England’s Channel 4.

M*A*S*H (1970)

- Director: Robert Altman
- IMDb user rating: 7.4
- Metascore: 80
- Runtime: 116 minutes

The dark war comedy “M*A*S*H” follows a medical personnel unit using humor to keep its spirits up during the Korean War. Robert Altman’s movie won the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film at the 1970 Cannes Film Festival—the highest festival award at the time—and eventually received five Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. Its television spin-off of the same name, “M*A*S*H,” ran for 11 years and became one of the most renowned shows in American TV history.

The Mask (1994)

- Director: Chuck Russell
- IMDb user rating: 6.9
- Metascore: 56
- Runtime: 101 minutes

In “The Mask,” awkward banker Stanley, portrayed by Jim Carrey, becomes a manic supernatural playboy and begins a romance with nightclub singer Tina, played by Cameron Diaz, when he wears a magical mask. However, Stanley is soon targeted by a mafia gangster who wants to use the mask to unseat his boss. The movie became the second most profitable movie based on a comic until that point, inspiring a TV version called “The Mask: Animated Series,” which aired on CBS from 1995 to 1997 and featured Rob Paulsen as the voice of Stanley/The Mask.

Men in Black (1997)

- Director: Barry Sonnenfeld
- IMDb user rating: 7.3
- Metascore: 71
- Runtime: 98 minutes

Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones costar in Barry Sonnenfeld’s sci-fi action comedy, playing two agents of a secret organization called the “Men in Black.” Their job is to supervise the aliens who live on Earth, and make sure that normal humans don’t find out about them. However, things get more complicated when the agents uncover an alien assassin’s plot to kill two New York City alien ambassadors. The movie’s box office success led to multiple film sequels, as well as “Men in Black: The Series,” an animated show based on it that aired on Kids’ WB from 1997 to 2001.

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Minority Report (2002)

- Director: Steven Spielberg
- IMDb user rating: 7.6
- Metascore: 80
- Runtime: 145 minutes

“Minority Report” unfolds in a futuristic 2054 world, where a police department known as PreCrime employ psychics called “precogs” to catch criminals through their foresight. Tom Cruise stars in the movie as John, the chief of PreCrime. By 2015, a Fox crime drama series aired for one season and functioned as a direct sequel to "Minority Report."

Moonrunners (1975)

- Director: Gy Waldron
- IMDb user rating: 6.4
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 110 minutes

James Mitchum plays the lead role in the action comedy “Moonrunners,” a B movie about a family that runs bootleg liquor. The film was based on a real ex-moonshiner, and four years later, the story was adapted into the massively popular television comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard.” The series centers on Bo Duke, played by John Schneider, and Luke Duke, played by Tom Wopat, two cousins who get into trouble for moonshine-running in their small town. The “Dukes of Hazzard” ran for seven seasons, and the 1969 Dodge Charger that the main characters drive became an instantly recognizable part of the show.

Mortal Kombat (1995)

- Director: Paul W.S. Anderson
- IMDb user rating: 5.8
- Metascore: 58
- Runtime: 101 minutes

A loose adaptation of the similarly named fighting game series, “Mortal Kombat” follows an actor played by Linden Ashby, a monk played by Robin Shou, and a soldier played by Bridgette Wilson, who must fight an evil sorcerer named Shang Tsung, played by Cary-Hirouki Tagawa, in a tournament to determine Earth’s fate. Two TV series based on the 1995 film and the franchise’s video games debuted and ran for one season: “Mortal Kombat: Defenders of the Realm,” which was produced from 1996 to 1999, and “Mortal Kombat: The Animated Series,” which ran from 1998 to 1999.

My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002)

- Director: Joel Zwick
- IMDb user rating: 6.5
- Metascore: 62
- Runtime: 95 minutes

In “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” young Greek American woman Fotoula “Toula” Portokalos, played by screenwriter Nia Vardalos, struggles to convince her family to accept her non-Greek fiancé, played by John Corbett, as hijinks ensue. The movie quietly became the highest-grossing romantic comedy of all time upon its release, leading to a short-lived CBS sitcom, “My Big Fat Greek Life,” starring Vardalos and Steven Eckholdt as the main couple.

National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

- Director: John Landis
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 79
- Runtime: 109 minutes

Partially inspired by stories from Harvard’s National Lampoon humor magazine, “National Lampoon’s Animal House” revolves around a rambunctious fraternity whose members butt heads with the college’s strict Dean Wormer, played by John Vernon. The movie is largely credited with popularizing Hollywood’s gross-out movie film genre, which willfully employs gratuitous, dirty humor to get laughs. A short-lived TV version called “Delta House,” which ran in spring of 1979, saw Vernon reprise his role as Wormer. Michelle Pfeiffer also had an early role on the series as “The Bombshell.”

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The Net (1995)

- Director: Irwin Winkler
- IMDb user rating: 5.9
- Metascore: 51
- Runtime: 114 minutes

Sandra Bullock stars in “The Net” as Bennet, a computer programmer whose life and identity becomes jeopardized when she is targeted by a mysterious cyber terrorist group known as the “Praetorians.” The thriller inspired a spin-off TV series starring Brooke Langton in the main role, which ran for one season on the USA Network from 1998 to 1999.

The Odd Couple (1968)

- Director: Gene Saks
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Metascore: 86
- Runtime: 105 minutes

In “The Odd Couple,” two recently divorced men—the highly organized, type-A Felix, played by Jack Lemmon, and easygoing slob Oscar, played by Walter Matthau—struggle to put aside their differences and live together. After enjoying critical and commercial success, the comedy, which was adapted from a Neil Simon play, became the basis for multiple TV sitcoms of the same name. One aired from 1970 to 1975 and starred Tony Randall and Jack Klugman in the leading roles, while another aired from 2015 to 2017 and starred Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon.

The Omen (1976)

- Director: Richard Donner
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 62
- Runtime: 111 minutes

In “The Omen,” Harvey Spencer Stevens is featured as Damien Thorn, a young adopted British boy who is revealed to be the prophesied Antichrist after deaths begin to follow his family. Richard Donner’s horror film became one of the highest-earning 1976 movies, and won an Academy Award for Best Original Score. An A&E sequel series called “Damien” aired for one season on A&E, following the adult titular character as he remembers his dormant Antichrist side.

Paper Moon (1973)

- Director: Peter Bogdanovich
- IMDb user rating: 8.1
- Metascore: 77
- Runtime: 102 minutes

Set during the Great Depression, “Paper Moon” begins as con artist Moze, played by Ryan O’Neal, is tasked with bringing 9-year-old Addie, played by O’Neal’s real-life daughter Tatum O’Neal, to Missouri relatives after her mother dies. When his attempt to swindle money out of her fails, Moze takes his young charge on as a partner, and they scam their way around the Midwest. The younger O’Neal won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress at just 10, making her the youngest competitive winner in Oscars history. A TV version of “Paper Moon” premiered on ABC in 1974 with Jodie Foster as Addie, but was canceled after one season.

Parenthood (1989)

- Director: Ron Howard
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: 82
- Runtime: 124 minutes

“Parenthood” takes place over a single summer, as four Midwestern siblings deal with the ensuing chaos that comes with raising their families. Steve Martin led the ensemble cast, which also included well-known actors like Joaquin Phoenix and Keanu Reeves. The film resulted in two NBC TV adaptations of the same name, which premiered in 1990 and 2010. The former was canceled after one season, while the latter, which reimagined the original family comedy as a dramedy, ran for six seasons.

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Party Girl (1995)

- Director: Daisy von Scherler Mayer
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: 55
- Runtime: 94 minutes

Notably the first movie to premiere on the internet, “Party Girl” stars Parker Posey as Mary, a free-spirited New York City partyer who reevaluates her life and comes into her own when her Aunt Judy, played by Sasha von Scherler, gets her a job at a library. A sitcom based on the film aired on Fox for four episodes and saw Christine Taylor take over the role of Mary.

Peyton Place (1957)

- Director: Mark Robson
- IMDb user rating: 7.2
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 157 minutes

In “Peyton Place,” the residents of a World War II-era New England town grapple with issues like homicide while struggling to promote their home’s picturesque, wholesome facade. The movie was adapted from Grace Metalious’s 1956 novel of the same name and received nine Academy Award nominations. It was later reimagined as a soap opera that ran on ABC from 1964 to 1969.

Planet of the Apes (1968)

- Director: Franklin J. Schaffner
- IMDb user rating: 8
- Metascore: 79
- Runtime: 112 minutes

The classic sci-fi movie “Planet of the Apes” sees an astronaut crew become stranded on a mysterious futuristic planet where apes are the intelligent, dominant species, while human beings have become mute and animalistic. It sparked several film sequels and was renowned for makeup artist John Chambers’ groundbreaking prosthetic techniques. A short-lived ABC TV adaptation of the same name ran for one season in the fall of 1974.

Private Benjamin (1980)

- Director: Howard Zieff
- IMDb user rating: 6.2
- Metascore: 59
- Runtime: 109 minutes

Goldie Hawn stars in “Private Benjamin” as Judy, a privileged young high society woman who is convinced to join the U.S. Army on a lark after her husband, portrayed by Albert Brooks, suddenly dies on their wedding night. Although she quickly struggles to prove herself in grueling training conditions, with the help of Eileen Brennen, who plays Captain Lewis, she slowly learns what it means to be a “good soldier.” Howard Ziff’s Oscar-nominated film was one of the greatest box office successes of 1980, and inspired an Emmy and Golden Globe-winning television show, also called “Private Benjamin,” that aired from 1981 to 1983.

Psycho (1960)

- Director: Alfred Hitchcock
- IMDb user rating: 8.5
- Metascore: 97
- Runtime: 109 minutes

While master of suspense Alfred Hitchcock created many iconic films over the course of his career, his most influential is arguably 1960s “Psycho.” In the movie, Janet Leigh portrays a Phoenix secretary who has embezzled $40,000 from her boss’s client and goes on the run, but all isn’t what it seems when she checks into a remote hotel run by young Norman Bates, played by Anthony Perkins, and his controlling mother. The film is now widely considered to be one of the earliest examples of a slasher movie. Decades later, a contemporary prequel to the film called “Bates Motel” aired on A&E from 2013 to 2017. It depicts the lives of Norman and his mother prior to the events of “Psycho.”

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RoboCop (1987)

- Director: Paul Verhoeven
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: 67
- Runtime: 102 minutes

When protagonist Alex Murphy, played by Peter Weller, is murdered by a criminal gang in Detroit, he’s soon revived by a megacorporation as a cyborg law enforcer simply called RoboCop. The sci-fi action film, which explores themes like gentrification and authoritarianism, became a commercial hit that led to an entire “RoboCop” franchise—including multiple TV adaptations. These include 1988 and 1994 shows of the same name, which both aired for one season, as well as the 2001 Canadian miniseries “RoboCop: Prime Directives,” which included four feature film-length “episodes.”

Serpico (1973)

- Director: Sidney Lumet
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Metascore: 87
- Runtime: 130 minutes

Al Pacino starred in the neo-noir crime film “Serpico,” which was inspired by Peter Maas’ 1973 biography of a real NYPD policeman who went undercover to expose police corruption around him. Pacino went on to receive a Best Actor nomination at the Academy Awards, and the movie led to an NBC television adaptation starring David Birney as police officer Frank Serpico.

Seven Samurai (1954)

- Director: Akira Kurosawa
- IMDb user rating: 8.6
- Metascore: 98
- Runtime: 207 minutes

Largely regarded as one of the best and most influential movies of all time, this Japanese samurai drama tells the story of a farming village that hires seven rōnin—masterless samurai—to fight off bandits who are attempting to steal their crops. In 2004, a Japanese anime TV series called “Samurai 7” retold the film’s story in animated format.

Shaft (1971)

- Director: Gordon Parks
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: 66
- Runtime: 100 minutes

“Shaft” centers on private detective John Shaft, played by Richard Roundtree, who is hired by a Harlem mobster to bring back his daughter after Italian mobsters kidnap her and the corrupt police force are of little help. It has since been hailed as one of the prime and most popular films within the blaxploitation genre. A CBS series of the same name aired from 1973 to 1974, featuring seven feature film-length episodes with actor Richard Roundtree as Shaft. However, to appeal to “mass audiences,” the network made the controversial decision of making Shaft work with the police, instead of opposing them.

Sitting Pretty (1948)

- Director: Walter Lang
- IMDb user rating: 7.5
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 83 minutes

In “Sitting Pretty,” a wealthy family hires a lovable yet mysterious man named Lynn Belvedere, played by Clifton Webb, to look after its children. Webb received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for his role, and Belvedere became such a popular character that he played him once again in the movies “Mr. Belvedere Goes to College” and “Mr. Belvedere Rings the Bell.” An ABC sitcom titled “Mr. Belvedere” ran for six seasons, from 1985 to 1990, and starred Christopher Hewett as the titular butler. The series was groundbreaking for a season two episode called “Wesley’s Friend,” which featured a then-unprecedented HIV storyline that was handled empathetically.

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Stargate (1994)

- Director: Roland Emmerich
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Metascore: 42
- Runtime: 116 minutes

“Stargate” follows James Spader’s character, Professor Daniel Jackson, and Kurt Russell’s character, retired soldier Jack O’Neil, who unlock an Egyptian teleportation device and find themselves on an Egypt-like planet where people resembling ancient Egyptians worship the corrupt alien Ra, played by Jaye Davidson. The movie received mixed reviews but became a worldwide box office success, leading to the popular military sci-fi TV show “Stargate SG-1,” which ran for 10 seasons and over 200 episodes. The series begins a year after the events of the film, as an Air Force team called G-1 travels the galaxy and defeats alien threats.

Starman (1984)

- Director: John Carpenter
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: 70
- Runtime: 115 minutes

An Oscar-nominated Jeff Bridges plays the titular alien in “Starman,” who assumes the form of a late Midwestern man called Scott after crash-landing on Earth. As he fights to find a vessel from his home world, Starman unexpectedly falls in love with Scott’s widow, Jenny, played by Karen Allen. A TV adaptation of the same name aired on ABC from 1986 to 1987. Set 15 years after the film, it centers on the same alien, played by Robert Hays, who arrives back on Earth to help his now-teenage human son, played by Christopher Daniel Barnes, find Jenny, who has gone missing.

Stir Crazy (1980)

- Director: Sidney Poitier
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 56
- Runtime: 111 minutes

In “Stir Crazy,” Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor play Skip and Harry, awkward best friends who attempt to befriend their fellow prison inmates after being sentenced to 125 years behind bars for a crime they didn’t commit. The movie’s success led to a 1985 TV spin-off, also called “Stir Crazy,” in which actors Harry Fletcher and Skip Harrington played the friends. However, CBS canceled the series after only nine episodes aired.

Teen Wolf (1985)

- Director: Rod Daniel
- IMDb user rating: 6.1
- Metascore: 25
- Runtime: 91 minutes

Michael J. Fox stars in the hit coming-of-age comedy “Teen Wolf” as Scott, an ordinary teenager who begins turning into a werewolf after a creature bites him one night in the woods. The film led to a cartoon series of the same name, which ran for two seasons on CBS from 1986 to 1987. In the show, Scott and his family now live in a town called Wolverton, which regularly draws tourists due to a history of werewolf sightings.

The Terminator (1984)

- Director: James Cameron
- IMDb user rating: 8
- Metascore: 84
- Runtime: 107 minutes

In “The Terminator,” Arnold Schwarzenegger portrays the film’s titular cyborg assassin, who’s sent back in time from 2029 to 1984 to kill Sarah Connor, played by Linda Hamilton, who is destined to give birth to a son who will lead the human revolution against cyborgs. The movie made James Cameron a major name in Hollywood, and launched a franchise that included the short-lived Fox series “Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles,” which aired from 2008 to 2009. The spin-off follows the lives of Sarah, “Game of Thrones” star Lena Headey, and her son, John, played by Thomas Dekker, after the events of the original movie’s sequel, “Terminator 2: Judgment Day.”

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Timecop (1994)

- Director: Peter Hyams
- IMDb user rating: 5.9
- Metascore: 48
- Runtime: 99 minutes

Based on a story that appeared in the anthology “Dark Horse Comics,” “Timecop” follows Jean-Claude Van Damme’s character Max Walker, a police officer that is able to fight crime through time-travel. Soon, he also becomes responsible for trailing Ron Silver, a corrupt politician. The cult classic inspired a TV show of the same name, which starred Ted King as the newly named Officer Jack Logan, and aired for one season on ABC in 1997.

Training Day (2001)

- Director: Antoine Fuqua
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Metascore: 69
- Runtime: 122 minutes

Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke star in “Training Day” as two Los Angeles policemen on the force’s inner-city narcotics unit. Hawke plays a rookie cop who is invited to ride along with Washington, a veteran detective, but soon finds that his superior has ulterior motives that place him at the center of an elaborate drug scheme. Washington won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role, while Hawke also received a Best Supporting Actor nomination. In 2017, a TV version of “Training Day,” led by Bill Paxton and Justin Cornwell, ran for one season on CBS. It featured one of Paxton’s last performances after he died that same year.

Tremors (1990)

- Director: Ron Underwood
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Metascore: 65
- Runtime: 96 minutes

In the sci-fi horror comedy “Tremors,” the inhabitants of a small desert town, made up of an ensemble cast including Kevin Bacon, Fred Ward, and Reba McEntire, are forced to defend themselves when huge, worm-like monsters begin killing them off one by one. The film was followed by five direct-to-video sequels and “Tremor: The TV series,” which aired for one season on the Sci-Fi Channel and began after the events of “Tremors 3: Back to Perfection.”

Twelve O'Clock High (1949)

- Director: Henry King
- IMDb user rating: 7.7
- Metascore: data not available
- Runtime: 132 minutes

“Twelve O’Clock High” revolves around strict U.S. Army Gen. Frank Savage, played by Gregory Peck, who’s tasked with whipping a failing World War II bomber unit into shape and boosting its morale. The acclaimed film was nominated for four Oscars and won two: Best Sound Recording and Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Dean Jagger. The film later became an identically named ABC television series, which premiered in 1964 and ran for three seasons. “The Twelve O’Clock High” show often reused combat footage from the original 1949 movie.

Uncle Buck (1989)

- Director: John Hughes
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: 51
- Runtime: 100 minutes

John Candy stars as the titular character in John Hughes’ “Uncle Buck,” playing a gruff slob who’s forced to babysit his nieces and nephew when their parents leave town for an emergency. Two TV adaptations of the same name aired for one season in 1990 and 2016, and were quickly canceled. The 1990 CBS version starred Kevin Meaney as Buck, who becomes the legal guardian of his nieces and nephew after their parents die in a car accident. The 2016 ABC version featured an African American family, with Mike Epps in the title role.

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The War of Worlds (1953)

- Director: Byron Haskin
- IMDb user rating: 7.1
- Metascore: 78
- Runtime: 85 minutes

When Martians suddenly invade Earth in “The War of the Worlds,” it’s up to scientist Clayton Forrester, played by Gene Barry, to find a way to stop them from taking over the planet. Byron Haskin’s film was the first movie adaptation of H.G. Wells’ 1898 novel, and its use of the alien invasion storyline reflected America’s paranoia about the atomic age near the beginning of the Cold War.

Weird Science (1985)

- Director: John Hughes
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: 46
- Runtime: 94 minutes

In “Weird Science,” high school outcasts Gary, played by Anthony Michael Hall, and Wyatt, played by Ilan Mitchell-Smith, use computer software and the help of an electrical freak accident to create the “perfect” lifelike woman Lisa, played by Kelly LeBrock. She helps them rise up the social ladder at school, but they’re forced to hide her from Chet, played by Bill Paxton, Wyatt’s obnoxious older brother. “Weird Science” became regarded as a cult classic, and a USA Network TV sitcom based on it ran from 1994 to 1998, exploring Lisa and the boys’ escapades.

Westworld (1973)

- Director: Michael Crichton
- IMDb user rating: 7
- Metascore: 77
- Runtime: 88 minutes

“Westworld” was "Jurassic Park" author Michael Crichton’s feature directorial debut, and much like that story, it involves a futuristic theme park that goes terribly wrong. In the film, a Western-themed amusement park filled with life-like androids falls apart when the androids, particularly one played by Yul Brenner, begin attacking and killing visitors. In 2016, HBO reimagined the movie as a prestige TV show with a similar Western theme park setting, and the new Westworld became the most-watched first season of any HBO original series. The series went on to win nine Emmy Awards.

Wet Hot American Summer (2001)

- Director: David Wain
- IMDb user rating: 6.6
- Metascore: 42
- Runtime: 97 minutes

The satirical comedy “Wet Hot American Summer” takes place during the last day at a fictional summer camp in 1981, and serves as a spoof of 1980s teen camp comedies. Although the movie performed poorly in movie theaters and with critics, it has since developed a cult following and is notable for being actor Bradley Cooper’s first feature film. Many other A-list stars, such as Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler, also appear. Netflix went on to release two TV series based on the movie, with most of the original cast returning. The 2015 series “Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp” is a prequel, while “Wet Hot Summer: Ten Years Later” follows the characters a decade after the events of the film.

Working Girl (1988)

- Director: Mike Nichols
- IMDb user rating: 6.8
- Metascore: 73
- Runtime: 113 minutes

After Melanie Griffith’s character, New York receptionist Tess, has a clever business idea stolen by her calculating boss Katharine, played by Sigourney Weaver, she decides to get revenge by initiating a major deal with an investment broker while Katharine is in the hospital. The movie was nominated for several Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actress for Griffith, and Best Supporting Actress for Weaver and her co-star, Joan Cusack. “Working Girl” was made into a one-season NBC series of the same name in 1990, starring Sandra Bullock as Tess.

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